Postural control and shoulder steadiness in F-16 pilots: a randomized controlled study

Britt Lange, Mike Murray, Shadi S Chreiteh, Palle Toft, Marie B Jørgensen, Karen Søgaard, Gisela Sjøgaard

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: During maneuvering, fighter pilots experience loads of up to 50-70 kg on their necks. Neck disorders are common and have been linked to impairment in muscle control. We conducted an intervention study introducing targeted training for 24 wk that reduced neck pain. The current study reports the results of the secondary objective, which was to increase the understanding of possible mechanisms underlying such neck pain and its intervention-related relief.

METHODS: In a parallel, single-blinded, randomized controlled study, 55 F-16 pilots were evaluated at baseline and randomized to a control group (CG; N = 28) or training group (TG; N = 27). Postural control was tested in four different settings: Romberg with open and closed eyes, unilateral stance, and perturbation. Maximal voluntary contraction and force steadiness was measured for shoulder elevation.

RESULTS: At follow-up, there was a significant between-group difference in the Romberg test with closed eyes only (95% confidence ellipse area; CG: 761 +/- 311 mm2; TG: 650 +/- 405 mm2). Prior to randomization, there were no significant differences in postural control and steadiness between 30 pilots who experienced neck pain within the previous 3 mo and 25 pilots without such pain.

DISCUSSION: Impaired postural control and steadiness may only be quantifiable in individuals experiencing acute neck pain of certain intensity, and there may be a ceiling effect in the ability to improve these parameters. For individuals with highly developed physiological capacity, a battery of tests with more stringent demands should be considered, e.g., increased number of repetitions, prolonged duration of the tests, or testing with eyes closed.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine
Vol/bind85
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)420-5
ISSN0095-6562
StatusUdgivet - apr. 2014

Fingeraftryk

Neck Pain
Acute Pain
Random Allocation
Muscles
Control Groups

Citer dette

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: During maneuvering, fighter pilots experience loads of up to 50-70 kg on their necks. Neck disorders are common and have been linked to impairment in muscle control. We conducted an intervention study introducing targeted training for 24 wk that reduced neck pain. The current study reports the results of the secondary objective, which was to increase the understanding of possible mechanisms underlying such neck pain and its intervention-related relief.METHODS: In a parallel, single-blinded, randomized controlled study, 55 F-16 pilots were evaluated at baseline and randomized to a control group (CG; N = 28) or training group (TG; N = 27). Postural control was tested in four different settings: Romberg with open and closed eyes, unilateral stance, and perturbation. Maximal voluntary contraction and force steadiness was measured for shoulder elevation.RESULTS: At follow-up, there was a significant between-group difference in the Romberg test with closed eyes only (95{\%} confidence ellipse area; CG: 761 +/- 311 mm2; TG: 650 +/- 405 mm2). Prior to randomization, there were no significant differences in postural control and steadiness between 30 pilots who experienced neck pain within the previous 3 mo and 25 pilots without such pain.DISCUSSION: Impaired postural control and steadiness may only be quantifiable in individuals experiencing acute neck pain of certain intensity, and there may be a ceiling effect in the ability to improve these parameters. For individuals with highly developed physiological capacity, a battery of tests with more stringent demands should be considered, e.g., increased number of repetitions, prolonged duration of the tests, or testing with eyes closed.",
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Postural control and shoulder steadiness in F-16 pilots : a randomized controlled study. / Lange, Britt; Murray, Mike; Chreiteh, Shadi S; Toft, Palle; Jørgensen, Marie B; Søgaard, Karen; Sjøgaard, Gisela.

I: Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, Bind 85, Nr. 4, 04.2014, s. 420-5.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Postural control and shoulder steadiness in F-16 pilots

T2 - a randomized controlled study

AU - Lange, Britt

AU - Murray, Mike

AU - Chreiteh, Shadi S

AU - Toft, Palle

AU - Jørgensen, Marie B

AU - Søgaard, Karen

AU - Sjøgaard, Gisela

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - BACKGROUND: During maneuvering, fighter pilots experience loads of up to 50-70 kg on their necks. Neck disorders are common and have been linked to impairment in muscle control. We conducted an intervention study introducing targeted training for 24 wk that reduced neck pain. The current study reports the results of the secondary objective, which was to increase the understanding of possible mechanisms underlying such neck pain and its intervention-related relief.METHODS: In a parallel, single-blinded, randomized controlled study, 55 F-16 pilots were evaluated at baseline and randomized to a control group (CG; N = 28) or training group (TG; N = 27). Postural control was tested in four different settings: Romberg with open and closed eyes, unilateral stance, and perturbation. Maximal voluntary contraction and force steadiness was measured for shoulder elevation.RESULTS: At follow-up, there was a significant between-group difference in the Romberg test with closed eyes only (95% confidence ellipse area; CG: 761 +/- 311 mm2; TG: 650 +/- 405 mm2). Prior to randomization, there were no significant differences in postural control and steadiness between 30 pilots who experienced neck pain within the previous 3 mo and 25 pilots without such pain.DISCUSSION: Impaired postural control and steadiness may only be quantifiable in individuals experiencing acute neck pain of certain intensity, and there may be a ceiling effect in the ability to improve these parameters. For individuals with highly developed physiological capacity, a battery of tests with more stringent demands should be considered, e.g., increased number of repetitions, prolonged duration of the tests, or testing with eyes closed.

AB - BACKGROUND: During maneuvering, fighter pilots experience loads of up to 50-70 kg on their necks. Neck disorders are common and have been linked to impairment in muscle control. We conducted an intervention study introducing targeted training for 24 wk that reduced neck pain. The current study reports the results of the secondary objective, which was to increase the understanding of possible mechanisms underlying such neck pain and its intervention-related relief.METHODS: In a parallel, single-blinded, randomized controlled study, 55 F-16 pilots were evaluated at baseline and randomized to a control group (CG; N = 28) or training group (TG; N = 27). Postural control was tested in four different settings: Romberg with open and closed eyes, unilateral stance, and perturbation. Maximal voluntary contraction and force steadiness was measured for shoulder elevation.RESULTS: At follow-up, there was a significant between-group difference in the Romberg test with closed eyes only (95% confidence ellipse area; CG: 761 +/- 311 mm2; TG: 650 +/- 405 mm2). Prior to randomization, there were no significant differences in postural control and steadiness between 30 pilots who experienced neck pain within the previous 3 mo and 25 pilots without such pain.DISCUSSION: Impaired postural control and steadiness may only be quantifiable in individuals experiencing acute neck pain of certain intensity, and there may be a ceiling effect in the ability to improve these parameters. For individuals with highly developed physiological capacity, a battery of tests with more stringent demands should be considered, e.g., increased number of repetitions, prolonged duration of the tests, or testing with eyes closed.

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 24754203

VL - 85

SP - 420

EP - 425

JO - Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine

JF - Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine

SN - 0095-6562

IS - 4

ER -