Postgraduate Education in Radiation Oncology in Low- and Middle-income Countries

J. G. Eriksen*

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

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Resumé

Radiation therapy is one of the most cost-effective ways to treat cancer patients on both a curative and palliative basis in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Despite this, the gap in radiation oncology capacity is enormous and is even increasing due to a rapid rise in the incidence of cancer cases in LMICs. The urgent need for radiotherapy resources in terms of bunkers and megavoltage machines is important, but equally important is the tremendous lack of properly educated health care professionals. This includes not just medical doctors, but also medical physicists, radiation therapists and nurses, as well as other supporting health care personnel. This overview discusses different ways to develop the standard setting of postgraduate specialist training and continuous medical education in LMICs.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftClinical Oncology
Vol/bind29
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)129-134
ISSN0936-6555
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Radiation Oncology
Education
Delivery of Health Care
Medical Education
Health Personnel
Neoplasms
Nurses
Incidence

Citer dette

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Postgraduate Education in Radiation Oncology in Low- and Middle-income Countries. / Eriksen, J. G.

I: Clinical Oncology, Bind 29, Nr. 2, 2017, s. 129-134.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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