Penetration through the Skin Barrier

Jesper Bo Nielsen, Eva Benfeldt, Rikke Holmgaard

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskning

Resumé

The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates. During recent decades, the latter has received increased attention as a route for intentionally delivering drugs to patients. This has stimulated research in methods for sampling, measuring and predicting percutaneous penetration. Previous chapters have described how different endogenous, genetic and exogenous factors may affect barrier characteristics. The present chapter introduces the theory for barrier penetration (Fick's law), and describes and discusses different methods for measuring the kinetics of percutaneous penetration of chemicals, including in vitro methods (static and flow-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous penetration. Finally, a short discussion of the advantages and challenges of each method is provided, which will hopefully allow the reader to improve decision making and treatment planning, as well as the evaluation of experimental studies of percutaneous penetration of chemicals.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelSkin Barrier Function
ForlagKarger
Publikationsdato2016
Sider103-111
ISBN (Trykt)9783318055856
ISBN (Elektronisk)9783318055863
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016
NavnCurrent Problems in Dermatology
Vol/bind49
ISSN1421-5721

Fingeraftryk

Skin
Microdialysis
Homeostasis
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Citer dette

Nielsen, J. B., Benfeldt, E., & Holmgaard, R. (2016). Penetration through the Skin Barrier. I Skin Barrier Function (s. 103-111). Karger. Current Problems in Dermatology, Bind. 49 https://doi.org/10.1159/000441549
Nielsen, Jesper Bo ; Benfeldt, Eva ; Holmgaard, Rikke. / Penetration through the Skin Barrier. Skin Barrier Function. Karger, 2016. s. 103-111 (Current Problems in Dermatology, Bind 49).
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Nielsen, JB, Benfeldt, E & Holmgaard, R 2016, Penetration through the Skin Barrier. i Skin Barrier Function. Karger, Current Problems in Dermatology, bind 49, s. 103-111. https://doi.org/10.1159/000441549

Penetration through the Skin Barrier. / Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke.

Skin Barrier Function. Karger, 2016. s. 103-111 (Current Problems in Dermatology, Bind 49).

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskning

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Nielsen JB, Benfeldt E, Holmgaard R. Penetration through the Skin Barrier. I Skin Barrier Function. Karger. 2016. s. 103-111. (Current Problems in Dermatology, Bind 49). https://doi.org/10.1159/000441549