Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

Resumé

Background: It is generally acknowledged that low back pain (LBP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, not many studies have looked at the way LBP tracks over age and how common it is until early adulthood.

Purposes: The purposes of this presentation are to show the prevalence estimates at three different ages (9,13,15) and how the LPB reporting tracks over these age groups.

Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from the years of 1997 till 2005, collecting interview data from children who were sampled to be representative of Danish schoolchildren. LBP was defined as having had reported pain in the lower back within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of LBP reporting over time are presented as percentages.

Results: Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys. The three prevalence estimates of LBP were 4%, 22% and 36%. In the youngest group LBP reporting was most common in boys whereas the opposite was the case in the two older groups. Longitudinal LBP data were available for 34%. Most children reported LBP only once over the six years and only one individual reported to have had LBP at all three surveys.

Conclusion: This study confirmed the rapid increase in the prevalence of LBP in children/adolescents. It also confirmed that during the years of growth spurt, this is more pronounced in girls than in boys. However, it is not the same individuals who report LBP all the time.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato10. jun. 2010
StatusUdgivet - 10. jun. 2010
BegivenhedThe British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference? - Odense, Danmark
Varighed: 9. jun. 201011. jun. 2010

Konference

KonferenceThe British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?
LandDanmark
ByOdense
Periode09/06/201011/06/2010

Emneord

  • Low Back Pain, children, teenagers, epidemiology

Citer dette

Kjær, P., Wedderkopp, N., Korsholm, L., & Leboeuf-Yde, C. (2010). Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents. Abstract fra The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.
Kjær, Per ; Wedderkopp, Niels ; Korsholm, Lars ; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte. / Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents. Abstract fra The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.
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title = "Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents",
abstract = "Background: It is generally acknowledged that low back pain (LBP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, not many studies have looked at the way LBP tracks over age and how common it is until early adulthood.Purposes: The purposes of this presentation are to show the prevalence estimates at three different ages (9,13,15) and how the LPB reporting tracks over these age groups.Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from the years of 1997 till 2005, collecting interview data from children who were sampled to be representative of Danish schoolchildren. LBP was defined as having had reported pain in the lower back within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of LBP reporting over time are presented as percentages.Results: Of the 771 children sampled, 62{\%}, 57{\%}, and 58{\%} participated in the three back surveys. The three prevalence estimates of LBP were 4{\%}, 22{\%} and 36{\%}. In the youngest group LBP reporting was most common in boys whereas the opposite was the case in the two older groups. Longitudinal LBP data were available for 34{\%}. Most children reported LBP only once over the six years and only one individual reported to have had LBP at all three surveys.Conclusion: This study confirmed the rapid increase in the prevalence of LBP in children/adolescents. It also confirmed that during the years of growth spurt, this is more pronounced in girls than in boys. However, it is not the same individuals who report LBP all the time.",
keywords = "Low Back Pain, children, teenagers, epidemiology",
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year = "2010",
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Kjær, P, Wedderkopp, N, Korsholm, L & Leboeuf-Yde, C 2010, 'Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents', The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark, 09/06/2010 - 11/06/2010.

Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents. / Kjær, Per; Wedderkopp, Niels; Korsholm, Lars; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte.

2010. Abstract fra The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents

AU - Kjær, Per

AU - Wedderkopp, Niels

AU - Korsholm, Lars

AU - Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

PY - 2010/6/10

Y1 - 2010/6/10

N2 - Background: It is generally acknowledged that low back pain (LBP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, not many studies have looked at the way LBP tracks over age and how common it is until early adulthood.Purposes: The purposes of this presentation are to show the prevalence estimates at three different ages (9,13,15) and how the LPB reporting tracks over these age groups.Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from the years of 1997 till 2005, collecting interview data from children who were sampled to be representative of Danish schoolchildren. LBP was defined as having had reported pain in the lower back within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of LBP reporting over time are presented as percentages.Results: Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys. The three prevalence estimates of LBP were 4%, 22% and 36%. In the youngest group LBP reporting was most common in boys whereas the opposite was the case in the two older groups. Longitudinal LBP data were available for 34%. Most children reported LBP only once over the six years and only one individual reported to have had LBP at all three surveys.Conclusion: This study confirmed the rapid increase in the prevalence of LBP in children/adolescents. It also confirmed that during the years of growth spurt, this is more pronounced in girls than in boys. However, it is not the same individuals who report LBP all the time.

AB - Background: It is generally acknowledged that low back pain (LBP) is a common condition already in childhood. However, not many studies have looked at the way LBP tracks over age and how common it is until early adulthood.Purposes: The purposes of this presentation are to show the prevalence estimates at three different ages (9,13,15) and how the LPB reporting tracks over these age groups.Methods: A longitudinal cohort study was carried out from the years of 1997 till 2005, collecting interview data from children who were sampled to be representative of Danish schoolchildren. LBP was defined as having had reported pain in the lower back within the past month. The prevalence estimates and the various patterns of LBP reporting over time are presented as percentages.Results: Of the 771 children sampled, 62%, 57%, and 58% participated in the three back surveys. The three prevalence estimates of LBP were 4%, 22% and 36%. In the youngest group LBP reporting was most common in boys whereas the opposite was the case in the two older groups. Longitudinal LBP data were available for 34%. Most children reported LBP only once over the six years and only one individual reported to have had LBP at all three surveys.Conclusion: This study confirmed the rapid increase in the prevalence of LBP in children/adolescents. It also confirmed that during the years of growth spurt, this is more pronounced in girls than in boys. However, it is not the same individuals who report LBP all the time.

KW - Low Back Pain, children, teenagers, epidemiology

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Kjær P, Wedderkopp N, Korsholm L, Leboeuf-Yde C. Patterns of Low Back Pain in children/adolescents. 2010. Abstract fra The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.