Patients' perceived level of social isolation affects the prognosis of low back pain

V C Oliveira, M L Ferreira, Lars Morsø, H B Albert, K M Refshauge, P H Ferreira

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Perceived social isolation is prevalent among patients with low back pain (LBP) and could be a potential prognostic factor for clinical outcomes following an episode of LBP.

METHODS: A secondary analysis of an original prospective cohort study, which investigated the validity of the Danish version of the STarT Back Screening Tool (STarT), investigated whether social isolation predicts the clinical outcomes of disability, anxiety, depression and pain catastrophizing in people with LBP. Patients with LBP of any duration (N = 204) from Middelfart, Denmark, were included. Social isolation was measured at baseline using the friendship scale (score ranges from 0 to 24, with lower values meaning higher perceived social isolation), and outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Regression models investigated whether social isolation at baseline predicted the outcomes at 6-month follow-up.

RESULTS: Some level of social isolation was reported by 39.2% of the participants (n = 80) with 5.9% (n = 12) being very socially isolated. One-point difference on social isolation predicted one point on a 100-point disability scale (adjusted unstandardized coefficient: -0.91; 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.56 to -0.26). Social isolation predicted anxiety; however, a change of one point on the social isolation scale represents a difference of only 0.08 points on a 22-point scale in anxiety (95% CI: 0.01-0.15) and is unlikely to denote clinical importance. Social isolation did not predict pain catastrophizing or depression.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perceived social isolation predicts disability related to LBP. Further understanding of the role of social isolation in LBP is warranted.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Pain
Vol/bind19
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)538-545
ISSN1090-3801
DOI
StatusUdgivet - apr. 2015

Fingeraftryk

Low Back Pain
Confidence Intervals
Depression
Denmark
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies

Citer dette

Oliveira, V. C., Ferreira, M. L., Morsø, L., Albert, H. B., Refshauge, K. M., & Ferreira, P. H. (2015). Patients' perceived level of social isolation affects the prognosis of low back pain. European Journal of Pain, 19(4), 538-545. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.578
Oliveira, V C ; Ferreira, M L ; Morsø, Lars ; Albert, H B ; Refshauge, K M ; Ferreira, P H. / Patients' perceived level of social isolation affects the prognosis of low back pain. I: European Journal of Pain. 2015 ; Bind 19, Nr. 4. s. 538-545.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Perceived social isolation is prevalent among patients with low back pain (LBP) and could be a potential prognostic factor for clinical outcomes following an episode of LBP.METHODS: A secondary analysis of an original prospective cohort study, which investigated the validity of the Danish version of the STarT Back Screening Tool (STarT), investigated whether social isolation predicts the clinical outcomes of disability, anxiety, depression and pain catastrophizing in people with LBP. Patients with LBP of any duration (N = 204) from Middelfart, Denmark, were included. Social isolation was measured at baseline using the friendship scale (score ranges from 0 to 24, with lower values meaning higher perceived social isolation), and outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Regression models investigated whether social isolation at baseline predicted the outcomes at 6-month follow-up.RESULTS: Some level of social isolation was reported by 39.2{\%} of the participants (n = 80) with 5.9{\%} (n = 12) being very socially isolated. One-point difference on social isolation predicted one point on a 100-point disability scale (adjusted unstandardized coefficient: -0.91; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI): -1.56 to -0.26). Social isolation predicted anxiety; however, a change of one point on the social isolation scale represents a difference of only 0.08 points on a 22-point scale in anxiety (95{\%} CI: 0.01-0.15) and is unlikely to denote clinical importance. Social isolation did not predict pain catastrophizing or depression.CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perceived social isolation predicts disability related to LBP. Further understanding of the role of social isolation in LBP is warranted.",
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Oliveira, VC, Ferreira, ML, Morsø, L, Albert, HB, Refshauge, KM & Ferreira, PH 2015, 'Patients' perceived level of social isolation affects the prognosis of low back pain', European Journal of Pain, bind 19, nr. 4, s. 538-545. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.578

Patients' perceived level of social isolation affects the prognosis of low back pain. / Oliveira, V C; Ferreira, M L; Morsø, Lars; Albert, H B; Refshauge, K M; Ferreira, P H.

I: European Journal of Pain, Bind 19, Nr. 4, 04.2015, s. 538-545.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patients' perceived level of social isolation affects the prognosis of low back pain

AU - Oliveira, V C

AU - Ferreira, M L

AU - Morsø, Lars

AU - Albert, H B

AU - Refshauge, K M

AU - Ferreira, P H

N1 - © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

PY - 2015/4

Y1 - 2015/4

N2 - BACKGROUND: Perceived social isolation is prevalent among patients with low back pain (LBP) and could be a potential prognostic factor for clinical outcomes following an episode of LBP.METHODS: A secondary analysis of an original prospective cohort study, which investigated the validity of the Danish version of the STarT Back Screening Tool (STarT), investigated whether social isolation predicts the clinical outcomes of disability, anxiety, depression and pain catastrophizing in people with LBP. Patients with LBP of any duration (N = 204) from Middelfart, Denmark, were included. Social isolation was measured at baseline using the friendship scale (score ranges from 0 to 24, with lower values meaning higher perceived social isolation), and outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Regression models investigated whether social isolation at baseline predicted the outcomes at 6-month follow-up.RESULTS: Some level of social isolation was reported by 39.2% of the participants (n = 80) with 5.9% (n = 12) being very socially isolated. One-point difference on social isolation predicted one point on a 100-point disability scale (adjusted unstandardized coefficient: -0.91; 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.56 to -0.26). Social isolation predicted anxiety; however, a change of one point on the social isolation scale represents a difference of only 0.08 points on a 22-point scale in anxiety (95% CI: 0.01-0.15) and is unlikely to denote clinical importance. Social isolation did not predict pain catastrophizing or depression.CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perceived social isolation predicts disability related to LBP. Further understanding of the role of social isolation in LBP is warranted.

AB - BACKGROUND: Perceived social isolation is prevalent among patients with low back pain (LBP) and could be a potential prognostic factor for clinical outcomes following an episode of LBP.METHODS: A secondary analysis of an original prospective cohort study, which investigated the validity of the Danish version of the STarT Back Screening Tool (STarT), investigated whether social isolation predicts the clinical outcomes of disability, anxiety, depression and pain catastrophizing in people with LBP. Patients with LBP of any duration (N = 204) from Middelfart, Denmark, were included. Social isolation was measured at baseline using the friendship scale (score ranges from 0 to 24, with lower values meaning higher perceived social isolation), and outcomes were measured at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Regression models investigated whether social isolation at baseline predicted the outcomes at 6-month follow-up.RESULTS: Some level of social isolation was reported by 39.2% of the participants (n = 80) with 5.9% (n = 12) being very socially isolated. One-point difference on social isolation predicted one point on a 100-point disability scale (adjusted unstandardized coefficient: -0.91; 95% confidence interval (CI): -1.56 to -0.26). Social isolation predicted anxiety; however, a change of one point on the social isolation scale represents a difference of only 0.08 points on a 22-point scale in anxiety (95% CI: 0.01-0.15) and is unlikely to denote clinical importance. Social isolation did not predict pain catastrophizing or depression.CONCLUSIONS: Patients' perceived social isolation predicts disability related to LBP. Further understanding of the role of social isolation in LBP is warranted.

U2 - 10.1002/ejp.578

DO - 10.1002/ejp.578

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 538

EP - 545

JO - European Journal of Pain

JF - European Journal of Pain

SN - 1090-3801

IS - 4

ER -