Paternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and adverse health outcomes: A nationwide cohort study on 13,547 exposed children

Olav Sivertsen Garvik*, Line Riis Jølving, Ken Lund, Sonia Friedman, Bente Mertz Nørgård

*Kontaktforfatter

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Abstract

Background: The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has increased over time. Several studies indicate that paternal use of medication may adversely affect the developing fetus. Only a few studies have investigated the association between preconceptional paternal exposure to SSRIs and the risks of adverse health outcomes in children. Objectives: This study aimed to assess adverse birth outcomes and adverse early life events in children fathered by men using SSRIs prior to conception. Materials and methods: All live-born singleton children born in Denmark from 1997 until 2019 and their parents were included. The exposed cohort comprised all children fathered by men using SSRIs 3 months prior to conception and the unexposed cohort comprised all other children. We estimated the odds ratios for adverse birth outcomes: small for gestational age (SGA), preterm birth, low Apgar score, and major congenital malformations. Furthermore, we estimated the hazard ratios for adverse early life events of infections and hospitalizations within 1 year from birth. We also examined adverse birth outcomes and the adverse early life events according to SSRI subgroups. Results: There was a statistically significantly increased odds ratio 1.15 (confidence interval, CI: 1.06–1.23) for preterm birth. No significant results were found for SGA, low Apgar score, and major congenital malformations. The adjusted hazard ratios for hospitalizations and infections were 1.06 (CI: 1.02–1.11) and 1.02 (CI: 0.97–1.07), respectively. There was a statistically significantly increased odds ratio for preterm birth with respect to the SSRI subgroups citalopram and escitalopram, and for hospitalizations with respect to citalopram. Discussion and conclusion: Although the risks of certain adverse birth and adverse early life outcomes were statistically significantly increased, the ratios were small and may have limited clinical importance. Paternal use of SSRI was in general safe in the preconceptual period.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAndrology
ISSN2047-2919
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 2024

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