Painting the Palace of Apries II

ancient pigments of the reliefs from the Palace of Apries, Lower Egypt

Signe Buccarella Hedegaard, Thomas Delbey, Cecilie Brøns, Kaare Lund Rasmussen*

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Resumé

Fragments of painted limestone reliefs from the Palace of Apries in Upper Egypt excavated by Flinders Petrie in 1908–1910 have been investigated using visible-induced luminescence imaging, micro X-ray fluorescence, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, micro X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The pigments have been mapped, and the use and previous reports of use of pigments are discussed. Mainly lead–antimonate yellow, lead–tin yellow, orpiment, atacamite, gypsum/anhydrite, and Egyptian blue have been detected. It is the first time that lead–antimonate yellow and lead–tin yellow have been identified in ancient Egyptian painting. In fact, this is the earliest examples known of both of these yellow pigments in the world.[Figure not available: see fulltext.].

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer54
TidsskriftHeritage Science
Vol/bind7
Udgave nummer1
Antal sider32
ISSN2050-7445
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019

Fingeraftryk

Egypt
Pigments
Relief
Palace
X-ray Powder Diffraction
Gypsum
Luminescence
Infrared
Egyptians
Egyptian Blue
Limestone
X-ray Fluorescence
Laser Ablation
Imaging
Visible

Citer dette

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title = "Painting the Palace of Apries II: ancient pigments of the reliefs from the Palace of Apries, Lower Egypt",
abstract = "Fragments of painted limestone reliefs from the Palace of Apries in Upper Egypt excavated by Flinders Petrie in 1908–1910 have been investigated using visible-induced luminescence imaging, micro X-ray fluorescence, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, micro X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The pigments have been mapped, and the use and previous reports of use of pigments are discussed. Mainly lead–antimonate yellow, lead–tin yellow, orpiment, atacamite, gypsum/anhydrite, and Egyptian blue have been detected. It is the first time that lead–antimonate yellow and lead–tin yellow have been identified in ancient Egyptian painting. In fact, this is the earliest examples known of both of these yellow pigments in the world.[Figure not available: see fulltext.].",
keywords = "Ancient Egyptian polychromy, Apries Palace, Atacamite, Egyptian blue, FTIR, LA-ICP-MS, Lead–antimonate yellow, Lead–tin yellow, Orpiment, VIL, µ-XRF, µ-XRPD",
author = "Hedegaard, {Signe Buccarella} and Thomas Delbey and Cecilie Br{\o}ns and Rasmussen, {Kaare Lund}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1186/s40494-019-0296-4",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "Heritage Science",
issn = "2050-7445",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
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Painting the Palace of Apries II : ancient pigments of the reliefs from the Palace of Apries, Lower Egypt. / Hedegaard, Signe Buccarella; Delbey, Thomas; Brøns, Cecilie; Rasmussen, Kaare Lund.

I: Heritage Science, Bind 7, Nr. 1, 54, 2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Painting the Palace of Apries II

T2 - ancient pigments of the reliefs from the Palace of Apries, Lower Egypt

AU - Hedegaard, Signe Buccarella

AU - Delbey, Thomas

AU - Brøns, Cecilie

AU - Rasmussen, Kaare Lund

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Fragments of painted limestone reliefs from the Palace of Apries in Upper Egypt excavated by Flinders Petrie in 1908–1910 have been investigated using visible-induced luminescence imaging, micro X-ray fluorescence, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, micro X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The pigments have been mapped, and the use and previous reports of use of pigments are discussed. Mainly lead–antimonate yellow, lead–tin yellow, orpiment, atacamite, gypsum/anhydrite, and Egyptian blue have been detected. It is the first time that lead–antimonate yellow and lead–tin yellow have been identified in ancient Egyptian painting. In fact, this is the earliest examples known of both of these yellow pigments in the world.[Figure not available: see fulltext.].

AB - Fragments of painted limestone reliefs from the Palace of Apries in Upper Egypt excavated by Flinders Petrie in 1908–1910 have been investigated using visible-induced luminescence imaging, micro X-ray fluorescence, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, micro X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The pigments have been mapped, and the use and previous reports of use of pigments are discussed. Mainly lead–antimonate yellow, lead–tin yellow, orpiment, atacamite, gypsum/anhydrite, and Egyptian blue have been detected. It is the first time that lead–antimonate yellow and lead–tin yellow have been identified in ancient Egyptian painting. In fact, this is the earliest examples known of both of these yellow pigments in the world.[Figure not available: see fulltext.].

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KW - Apries Palace

KW - Atacamite

KW - Egyptian blue

KW - FTIR

KW - LA-ICP-MS

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KW - Lead–tin yellow

KW - Orpiment

KW - VIL

KW - µ-XRF

KW - µ-XRPD

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DO - 10.1186/s40494-019-0296-4

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