Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination

Jona Walk, L. Charlotte J. de Bree, Wouter Graumans, Rianne Stoter, Geert Jan van Gemert, Marga van de Vegte-Bolmer, Karina Teelen, Cornelus C. Hermsen, Rob J.W. Arts, Marije C. Behet, Farid Keramati, Simone J.C.F.M. Moorlag, Annie S.P. Yang, Reinout van Crevel, Peter Aaby, Quirijn de Mast, André J.A.M. van der Ven, Christine Stabell Benn, Mihai G. Netea, Robert W. Sauerwein*

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

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Resumé

Recent evidence suggests that certain vaccines, including Bacillus-Calmette Guérin (BCG), can induce changes in the innate immune system with non-specific memory characteristics, termed ‘trained immunity’. Here we present the results of a randomised, controlled phase 1 clinical trial in 20 healthy male and female volunteers to evaluate the induction of immunity and protective efficacy of the anti-tuberculosis BCG vaccine against a controlled human malaria infection. After malaria challenge infection, BCG vaccinated volunteers present with earlier and more severe clinical adverse events, and have significantly earlier expression of NK cell activation markers and a trend towards earlier phenotypic monocyte activation. Furthermore, parasitemia in BCG vaccinated volunteers is inversely correlated with increased phenotypic NK cell and monocyte activation. The combined data demonstrate that BCG vaccination alters the clinical and immunological response to malaria, and form an impetus to further explore its potential in strategies for clinical malaria vaccine development.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer874
TidsskriftNature Communications
Vol/bind10
Antal sider8
ISSN2041-1723
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 20. feb. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Bacillus
infectious diseases
Bacilli
Malaria
vaccines
monocytes
Volunteers
Chemical activation
immunity
activation
Malaria Vaccines
BCG Vaccine
tuberculosis
immune systems
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Parasitemia
Immune system
Controlled Clinical Trials
cells
markers

Citer dette

Walk, J., de Bree, L. C. J., Graumans, W., Stoter, R., van Gemert, G. J., van de Vegte-Bolmer, M., ... Sauerwein, R. W. (2019). Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination. Nature Communications, 10, [874]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-08659-3
Walk, Jona ; de Bree, L. Charlotte J. ; Graumans, Wouter ; Stoter, Rianne ; van Gemert, Geert Jan ; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga ; Teelen, Karina ; Hermsen, Cornelus C. ; Arts, Rob J.W. ; Behet, Marije C. ; Keramati, Farid ; Moorlag, Simone J.C.F.M. ; Yang, Annie S.P. ; van Crevel, Reinout ; Aaby, Peter ; de Mast, Quirijn ; van der Ven, André J.A.M. ; Stabell Benn, Christine ; Netea, Mihai G. ; Sauerwein, Robert W. / Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination. I: Nature Communications. 2019 ; Bind 10.
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title = "Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination",
abstract = "Recent evidence suggests that certain vaccines, including Bacillus-Calmette Gu{\'e}rin (BCG), can induce changes in the innate immune system with non-specific memory characteristics, termed ‘trained immunity’. Here we present the results of a randomised, controlled phase 1 clinical trial in 20 healthy male and female volunteers to evaluate the induction of immunity and protective efficacy of the anti-tuberculosis BCG vaccine against a controlled human malaria infection. After malaria challenge infection, BCG vaccinated volunteers present with earlier and more severe clinical adverse events, and have significantly earlier expression of NK cell activation markers and a trend towards earlier phenotypic monocyte activation. Furthermore, parasitemia in BCG vaccinated volunteers is inversely correlated with increased phenotypic NK cell and monocyte activation. The combined data demonstrate that BCG vaccination alters the clinical and immunological response to malaria, and form an impetus to further explore its potential in strategies for clinical malaria vaccine development.",
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author = "Jona Walk and {de Bree}, {L. Charlotte J.} and Wouter Graumans and Rianne Stoter and {van Gemert}, {Geert Jan} and {van de Vegte-Bolmer}, Marga and Karina Teelen and Hermsen, {Cornelus C.} and Arts, {Rob J.W.} and Behet, {Marije C.} and Farid Keramati and Moorlag, {Simone J.C.F.M.} and Yang, {Annie S.P.} and {van Crevel}, Reinout and Peter Aaby and {de Mast}, Quirijn and {van der Ven}, {Andr{\'e} J.A.M.} and {Stabell Benn}, Christine and Netea, {Mihai G.} and Sauerwein, {Robert W.}",
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Walk, J, de Bree, LCJ, Graumans, W, Stoter, R, van Gemert, GJ, van de Vegte-Bolmer, M, Teelen, K, Hermsen, CC, Arts, RJW, Behet, MC, Keramati, F, Moorlag, SJCFM, Yang, ASP, van Crevel, R, Aaby, P, de Mast, Q, van der Ven, AJAM, Stabell Benn, C, Netea, MG & Sauerwein, RW 2019, 'Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination', Nature Communications, bind 10, 874. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-08659-3

Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination. / Walk, Jona; de Bree, L. Charlotte J.; Graumans, Wouter; Stoter, Rianne; van Gemert, Geert Jan; van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga; Teelen, Karina; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Arts, Rob J.W.; Behet, Marije C.; Keramati, Farid; Moorlag, Simone J.C.F.M.; Yang, Annie S.P.; van Crevel, Reinout; Aaby, Peter; de Mast, Quirijn; van der Ven, André J.A.M.; Stabell Benn, Christine; Netea, Mihai G.; Sauerwein, Robert W.

I: Nature Communications, Bind 10, 874, 20.02.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination

AU - Walk, Jona

AU - de Bree, L. Charlotte J.

AU - Graumans, Wouter

AU - Stoter, Rianne

AU - van Gemert, Geert Jan

AU - van de Vegte-Bolmer, Marga

AU - Teelen, Karina

AU - Hermsen, Cornelus C.

AU - Arts, Rob J.W.

AU - Behet, Marije C.

AU - Keramati, Farid

AU - Moorlag, Simone J.C.F.M.

AU - Yang, Annie S.P.

AU - van Crevel, Reinout

AU - Aaby, Peter

AU - de Mast, Quirijn

AU - van der Ven, André J.A.M.

AU - Stabell Benn, Christine

AU - Netea, Mihai G.

AU - Sauerwein, Robert W.

PY - 2019/2/20

Y1 - 2019/2/20

N2 - Recent evidence suggests that certain vaccines, including Bacillus-Calmette Guérin (BCG), can induce changes in the innate immune system with non-specific memory characteristics, termed ‘trained immunity’. Here we present the results of a randomised, controlled phase 1 clinical trial in 20 healthy male and female volunteers to evaluate the induction of immunity and protective efficacy of the anti-tuberculosis BCG vaccine against a controlled human malaria infection. After malaria challenge infection, BCG vaccinated volunteers present with earlier and more severe clinical adverse events, and have significantly earlier expression of NK cell activation markers and a trend towards earlier phenotypic monocyte activation. Furthermore, parasitemia in BCG vaccinated volunteers is inversely correlated with increased phenotypic NK cell and monocyte activation. The combined data demonstrate that BCG vaccination alters the clinical and immunological response to malaria, and form an impetus to further explore its potential in strategies for clinical malaria vaccine development.

AB - Recent evidence suggests that certain vaccines, including Bacillus-Calmette Guérin (BCG), can induce changes in the innate immune system with non-specific memory characteristics, termed ‘trained immunity’. Here we present the results of a randomised, controlled phase 1 clinical trial in 20 healthy male and female volunteers to evaluate the induction of immunity and protective efficacy of the anti-tuberculosis BCG vaccine against a controlled human malaria infection. After malaria challenge infection, BCG vaccinated volunteers present with earlier and more severe clinical adverse events, and have significantly earlier expression of NK cell activation markers and a trend towards earlier phenotypic monocyte activation. Furthermore, parasitemia in BCG vaccinated volunteers is inversely correlated with increased phenotypic NK cell and monocyte activation. The combined data demonstrate that BCG vaccination alters the clinical and immunological response to malaria, and form an impetus to further explore its potential in strategies for clinical malaria vaccine development.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Adult

KW - Animals

KW - Anopheles/parasitology

KW - B7-2 Antigen/metabolism

KW - BCG Vaccine/administration & dosage

KW - C-Reactive Protein/metabolism

KW - Cytokines/blood

KW - Female

KW - GPI-Linked Proteins/metabolism

KW - Granzymes/blood

KW - HLA-DR Antigens/metabolism

KW - Humans

KW - Immunity, Innate/immunology

KW - Immunologic Memory/immunology

KW - Interferon-gamma/blood

KW - Killer Cells, Natural/immunology

KW - Lymphocyte Activation/immunology

KW - Malaria, Falciparum/immunology

KW - Male

KW - Parasitemia/prevention & control

KW - Plasmodium falciparum/immunology

KW - Receptors, IgG/metabolism

KW - Vaccination

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1038/s41467-019-08659-3

DO - 10.1038/s41467-019-08659-3

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30787276

AN - SCOPUS:85061769116

VL - 10

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

M1 - 874

ER -

Walk J, de Bree LCJ, Graumans W, Stoter R, van Gemert GJ, van de Vegte-Bolmer M et al. Outcomes of controlled human malaria infection after BCG vaccination. Nature Communications. 2019 feb 20;10. 874. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-08659-3