Occupational issues of allergic contact dermatitis

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jun
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Vol/bind76
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)347-50
Antal sider3
ISSN0340-0131
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2003

Fingeraftryk

Occupational Dermatitis
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Contact Dermatitis
Allergens
Hypersensitivity
Product Labeling
Patch Tests
Occupational Diseases
Eczema
Nickel
Occupations
Skin Diseases
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Guinea Pigs

Citer dette

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title = "Occupational issues of allergic contact dermatitis",
abstract = "Occupational contact dermatitis is often of multifactorial origin, and it is difficult to determine the relative significance of the various contributing factors. Contact allergies are relevant in 20-50{\%} of recognised occupational contact dermatitis cases. The reported frequency in different studies varies, depending on differences in how occupational diseases are notified and recognised, in types of occupation in a geographical area, and the {"}quality{"} of the dermatological examination, including the accuracy of the diagnostic patch-test investigation. However, the clinical relevance of the reported contact allergies is often uncertain. Many occupational contact dermatitis patients with documented contact allergies develop chronic eczema, in spite of work changes and attempted allergen avoidance. Recognition/non-recognition of a notified case may be based on circumstantial evidence, because of difficulties in the establishing of a firm proof of work exposure and subsequent development of skin disease. Reliable quantitative exposure measuring techniques are needed. Methods are developed for the measurement of exposure to allergens such as nickel and acrylates, which makes it possible for exposure-effect relationships to be established with increased certainty. For prevention of allergic contact dermatitis it was a major step forward, with mandatory ingredient labelling of cosmetic products. However, improved labelling of the presence of contact allergens in household and industrial products is needed. For the identification of hazardous contact allergenic compounds, guinea pig or mice assays are still required. The local lymph node assay (LLNA), which is an objective and sensitive mouse assay has now been internationally validated and accepted.",
keywords = "Dermatitis, Allergic Contact, Dermatitis, Occupational, Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic, Humans, Occupational Exposure, Patch Tests",
author = "Andersen, {Klaus E}",
year = "2003",
doi = "10.1007/s00420-002-0420-7",
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Occupational issues of allergic contact dermatitis. / Andersen, Klaus E.

I: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, Bind 76, Nr. 5, 2003, s. 347-50.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Occupational issues of allergic contact dermatitis

AU - Andersen, Klaus E

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Occupational contact dermatitis is often of multifactorial origin, and it is difficult to determine the relative significance of the various contributing factors. Contact allergies are relevant in 20-50% of recognised occupational contact dermatitis cases. The reported frequency in different studies varies, depending on differences in how occupational diseases are notified and recognised, in types of occupation in a geographical area, and the "quality" of the dermatological examination, including the accuracy of the diagnostic patch-test investigation. However, the clinical relevance of the reported contact allergies is often uncertain. Many occupational contact dermatitis patients with documented contact allergies develop chronic eczema, in spite of work changes and attempted allergen avoidance. Recognition/non-recognition of a notified case may be based on circumstantial evidence, because of difficulties in the establishing of a firm proof of work exposure and subsequent development of skin disease. Reliable quantitative exposure measuring techniques are needed. Methods are developed for the measurement of exposure to allergens such as nickel and acrylates, which makes it possible for exposure-effect relationships to be established with increased certainty. For prevention of allergic contact dermatitis it was a major step forward, with mandatory ingredient labelling of cosmetic products. However, improved labelling of the presence of contact allergens in household and industrial products is needed. For the identification of hazardous contact allergenic compounds, guinea pig or mice assays are still required. The local lymph node assay (LLNA), which is an objective and sensitive mouse assay has now been internationally validated and accepted.

AB - Occupational contact dermatitis is often of multifactorial origin, and it is difficult to determine the relative significance of the various contributing factors. Contact allergies are relevant in 20-50% of recognised occupational contact dermatitis cases. The reported frequency in different studies varies, depending on differences in how occupational diseases are notified and recognised, in types of occupation in a geographical area, and the "quality" of the dermatological examination, including the accuracy of the diagnostic patch-test investigation. However, the clinical relevance of the reported contact allergies is often uncertain. Many occupational contact dermatitis patients with documented contact allergies develop chronic eczema, in spite of work changes and attempted allergen avoidance. Recognition/non-recognition of a notified case may be based on circumstantial evidence, because of difficulties in the establishing of a firm proof of work exposure and subsequent development of skin disease. Reliable quantitative exposure measuring techniques are needed. Methods are developed for the measurement of exposure to allergens such as nickel and acrylates, which makes it possible for exposure-effect relationships to be established with increased certainty. For prevention of allergic contact dermatitis it was a major step forward, with mandatory ingredient labelling of cosmetic products. However, improved labelling of the presence of contact allergens in household and industrial products is needed. For the identification of hazardous contact allergenic compounds, guinea pig or mice assays are still required. The local lymph node assay (LLNA), which is an objective and sensitive mouse assay has now been internationally validated and accepted.

KW - Dermatitis, Allergic Contact

KW - Dermatitis, Occupational

KW - Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic

KW - Humans

KW - Occupational Exposure

KW - Patch Tests

U2 - 10.1007/s00420-002-0420-7

DO - 10.1007/s00420-002-0420-7

M3 - Journal article

VL - 76

SP - 347

EP - 350

JO - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

JF - International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health

SN - 0340-0131

IS - 5

ER -