Non-specific Effects of Vaccines and Stunting: Timing May Be Essential

Mike Berendsen*, Jeroen Smits, Mihai Netea, Andre van der Ven

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background
Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination possesses effects on health beyond its target disease, the so called “non-specific effects”. We evaluate these effects, as well as the effect of timing of BCG and other vaccinations, on stunting in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) children under five.

Methods
We use a Big Data design, including cross-sectional data for 368,450 children from 33 SSA countries. Logistic regression analysis is used with control factors at child, mother, household and context level.

Results
Overall, BCG vaccination did not affect stunting in SSA children (OR 1.00 [0.98–1.03]). Timing of BCG vaccination was of importance (βtime = 0.067 [0.061–0.073]): compared to unvaccinated children, BCG was associated with lower odds on stunting for children vaccinated early in life (OR 0.92 [0.89–0.94]) and higher odds for children vaccinated later in infancy (OR 1.64 [1.53–1.76]). Similar findings were done for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)1 and measles vaccination, and when hemoglobin concentration was used as outcome variable.

Conclusions
We found a general time-dependent pattern of non-specific effects of vaccination, with positive associations for vaccinations given early in life and negative associations for vaccinations given later in infancy. If confirmed in further research, our findings may provide a new perspective on the non-specific effects of vaccination.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEBioMedicine
Vol/bind8
Sider (fra-til)341-348
ISSN2352-3964
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2016
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

Regression analysis
Logistics
Hemoglobins
Vaccines
Health
Big data
Diphtheria
Whooping Cough
Measles
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Mothers
Research

Citer dette

Berendsen, Mike ; Smits, Jeroen ; Netea, Mihai ; van der Ven, Andre. / Non-specific Effects of Vaccines and Stunting: Timing May Be Essential. I: EBioMedicine. 2016 ; Bind 8. s. 341-348.
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title = "Non-specific Effects of Vaccines and Stunting: Timing May Be Essential",
abstract = "BackgroundBacillus Calmette-Gu{\'e}rin (BCG) vaccination possesses effects on health beyond its target disease, the so called “non-specific effects”. We evaluate these effects, as well as the effect of timing of BCG and other vaccinations, on stunting in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) children under five.MethodsWe use a Big Data design, including cross-sectional data for 368,450 children from 33 SSA countries. Logistic regression analysis is used with control factors at child, mother, household and context level.ResultsOverall, BCG vaccination did not affect stunting in SSA children (OR 1.00 [0.98–1.03]). Timing of BCG vaccination was of importance (βtime = 0.067 [0.061–0.073]): compared to unvaccinated children, BCG was associated with lower odds on stunting for children vaccinated early in life (OR 0.92 [0.89–0.94]) and higher odds for children vaccinated later in infancy (OR 1.64 [1.53–1.76]). Similar findings were done for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)1 and measles vaccination, and when hemoglobin concentration was used as outcome variable.ConclusionsWe found a general time-dependent pattern of non-specific effects of vaccination, with positive associations for vaccinations given early in life and negative associations for vaccinations given later in infancy. If confirmed in further research, our findings may provide a new perspective on the non-specific effects of vaccination.",
author = "Mike Berendsen and Jeroen Smits and Mihai Netea and {van der Ven}, Andre",
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Non-specific Effects of Vaccines and Stunting: Timing May Be Essential. / Berendsen, Mike; Smits, Jeroen; Netea, Mihai; van der Ven, Andre.

I: EBioMedicine, Bind 8, 06.2016, s. 341-348.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-specific Effects of Vaccines and Stunting: Timing May Be Essential

AU - Berendsen, Mike

AU - Smits, Jeroen

AU - Netea, Mihai

AU - van der Ven, Andre

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - BackgroundBacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination possesses effects on health beyond its target disease, the so called “non-specific effects”. We evaluate these effects, as well as the effect of timing of BCG and other vaccinations, on stunting in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) children under five.MethodsWe use a Big Data design, including cross-sectional data for 368,450 children from 33 SSA countries. Logistic regression analysis is used with control factors at child, mother, household and context level.ResultsOverall, BCG vaccination did not affect stunting in SSA children (OR 1.00 [0.98–1.03]). Timing of BCG vaccination was of importance (βtime = 0.067 [0.061–0.073]): compared to unvaccinated children, BCG was associated with lower odds on stunting for children vaccinated early in life (OR 0.92 [0.89–0.94]) and higher odds for children vaccinated later in infancy (OR 1.64 [1.53–1.76]). Similar findings were done for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)1 and measles vaccination, and when hemoglobin concentration was used as outcome variable.ConclusionsWe found a general time-dependent pattern of non-specific effects of vaccination, with positive associations for vaccinations given early in life and negative associations for vaccinations given later in infancy. If confirmed in further research, our findings may provide a new perspective on the non-specific effects of vaccination.

AB - BackgroundBacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination possesses effects on health beyond its target disease, the so called “non-specific effects”. We evaluate these effects, as well as the effect of timing of BCG and other vaccinations, on stunting in Sub-Saharan African (SSA) children under five.MethodsWe use a Big Data design, including cross-sectional data for 368,450 children from 33 SSA countries. Logistic regression analysis is used with control factors at child, mother, household and context level.ResultsOverall, BCG vaccination did not affect stunting in SSA children (OR 1.00 [0.98–1.03]). Timing of BCG vaccination was of importance (βtime = 0.067 [0.061–0.073]): compared to unvaccinated children, BCG was associated with lower odds on stunting for children vaccinated early in life (OR 0.92 [0.89–0.94]) and higher odds for children vaccinated later in infancy (OR 1.64 [1.53–1.76]). Similar findings were done for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP)1 and measles vaccination, and when hemoglobin concentration was used as outcome variable.ConclusionsWe found a general time-dependent pattern of non-specific effects of vaccination, with positive associations for vaccinations given early in life and negative associations for vaccinations given later in infancy. If confirmed in further research, our findings may provide a new perspective on the non-specific effects of vaccination.

U2 - 10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.05.010

DO - 10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.05.010

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 341

EP - 348

JO - EBioMedicine

JF - EBioMedicine

SN - 2352-3964

ER -