Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies: a cohort study

Dorrit Hjortebjerg, Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen, Ester Garne, Ole Lundsgaard Raaschou-Nielsen, Mette Sørensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to organic solvents during the 1st trimester of pregnancy has been associated with congenital anomalies. Organic solvents are also used in the home environments in paint products, but no study has investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. METHODS: We studied associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and predefined subgroups of congenital anomalies, using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). During 2001 and 2003, a total of 20 103 pregnant women, enrolled in the DNBC, were interviewed in the 30th week of gestation about the use of paint in their residence during pregnancy. By the end of first trimester, information about smoking habits, alcohol consumption and occupation were collected. Information on congenital anomalies was obtained from national registers. Associations were examined by estimating odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. RESULTS: In total 1404 women (7 %) had been exposed to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and 1086 children were diagnosed with congenital anomalies; 73 children with congenital anomalies had been exposed to paint fumes in utero. Exposure to paint fumes seemed positively associated with congenital anomalies of the nervous system (OR 2.19, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.76 to 6.32), ear, face and neck (OR 2.15, 95 % CI 0.84 to 5.55) and the renal system (OR 2.16, 95 % CI 1.02 to 4.58) after adjustment for maternal age, smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational solvent exposure. Congenital anomalies in the remaining subgroups were not associated with the exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that in the general population, exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of some types of congenital anomalies, but the findings need to be confirmed.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEnvironmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
Vol/bind11
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)54
ISSN1476-069X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

Cohort Studies
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Occupational Exposure
Alcohol Drinking
Smoking
Nervous System Malformations
Maternal Age
First Pregnancy Trimester
Occupations
Population
Habits
Pregnant Women
Logistic Models
Kidney

Citer dette

Hjortebjerg, Dorrit ; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo ; Garne, Ester ; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole Lundsgaard ; Sørensen, Mette. / Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies : a cohort study. I: Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source. 2012 ; Bind 11, Nr. 1. s. 54.
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title = "Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies: a cohort study",
abstract = "ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to organic solvents during the 1st trimester of pregnancy has been associated with congenital anomalies. Organic solvents are also used in the home environments in paint products, but no study has investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. METHODS: We studied associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and predefined subgroups of congenital anomalies, using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). During 2001 and 2003, a total of 20 103 pregnant women, enrolled in the DNBC, were interviewed in the 30th week of gestation about the use of paint in their residence during pregnancy. By the end of first trimester, information about smoking habits, alcohol consumption and occupation were collected. Information on congenital anomalies was obtained from national registers. Associations were examined by estimating odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. RESULTS: In total 1404 women (7 {\%}) had been exposed to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and 1086 children were diagnosed with congenital anomalies; 73 children with congenital anomalies had been exposed to paint fumes in utero. Exposure to paint fumes seemed positively associated with congenital anomalies of the nervous system (OR 2.19, 95 {\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.76 to 6.32), ear, face and neck (OR 2.15, 95 {\%} CI 0.84 to 5.55) and the renal system (OR 2.16, 95 {\%} CI 1.02 to 4.58) after adjustment for maternal age, smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational solvent exposure. Congenital anomalies in the remaining subgroups were not associated with the exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that in the general population, exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of some types of congenital anomalies, but the findings need to be confirmed.",
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pages = "54",
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Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies : a cohort study. / Hjortebjerg, Dorrit; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Garne, Ester; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole Lundsgaard; Sørensen, Mette.

I: Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source, Bind 11, Nr. 1, 2012, s. 54.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and risk of congenital anomalies

T2 - a cohort study

AU - Hjortebjerg, Dorrit

AU - Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo

AU - Garne, Ester

AU - Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole Lundsgaard

AU - Sørensen, Mette

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to organic solvents during the 1st trimester of pregnancy has been associated with congenital anomalies. Organic solvents are also used in the home environments in paint products, but no study has investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. METHODS: We studied associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and predefined subgroups of congenital anomalies, using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). During 2001 and 2003, a total of 20 103 pregnant women, enrolled in the DNBC, were interviewed in the 30th week of gestation about the use of paint in their residence during pregnancy. By the end of first trimester, information about smoking habits, alcohol consumption and occupation were collected. Information on congenital anomalies was obtained from national registers. Associations were examined by estimating odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. RESULTS: In total 1404 women (7 %) had been exposed to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and 1086 children were diagnosed with congenital anomalies; 73 children with congenital anomalies had been exposed to paint fumes in utero. Exposure to paint fumes seemed positively associated with congenital anomalies of the nervous system (OR 2.19, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.76 to 6.32), ear, face and neck (OR 2.15, 95 % CI 0.84 to 5.55) and the renal system (OR 2.16, 95 % CI 1.02 to 4.58) after adjustment for maternal age, smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational solvent exposure. Congenital anomalies in the remaining subgroups were not associated with the exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that in the general population, exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of some types of congenital anomalies, but the findings need to be confirmed.

AB - ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to organic solvents during the 1st trimester of pregnancy has been associated with congenital anomalies. Organic solvents are also used in the home environments in paint products, but no study has investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. METHODS: We studied associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and predefined subgroups of congenital anomalies, using data from the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). During 2001 and 2003, a total of 20 103 pregnant women, enrolled in the DNBC, were interviewed in the 30th week of gestation about the use of paint in their residence during pregnancy. By the end of first trimester, information about smoking habits, alcohol consumption and occupation were collected. Information on congenital anomalies was obtained from national registers. Associations were examined by estimating odds ratios (OR) using logistic regression. RESULTS: In total 1404 women (7 %) had been exposed to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy and 1086 children were diagnosed with congenital anomalies; 73 children with congenital anomalies had been exposed to paint fumes in utero. Exposure to paint fumes seemed positively associated with congenital anomalies of the nervous system (OR 2.19, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.76 to 6.32), ear, face and neck (OR 2.15, 95 % CI 0.84 to 5.55) and the renal system (OR 2.16, 95 % CI 1.02 to 4.58) after adjustment for maternal age, smoking, alcohol consumption and occupational solvent exposure. Congenital anomalies in the remaining subgroups were not associated with the exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that in the general population, exposure to paint fumes during the 1st trimester of pregnancy may increase the risk of some types of congenital anomalies, but the findings need to be confirmed.

U2 - 10.1186/1476-069X-11-54

DO - 10.1186/1476-069X-11-54

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 22892023

VL - 11

SP - 54

JO - Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source

JF - Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source

SN - 1476-069X

IS - 1

ER -