No impact of surgery on cognitive function

a longitudinal study of middle-aged Danish twins

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Resumé

PURPOSE: To examine the association between exposure to surgery and 10-year change in cognitive functioning.

METHODS: Among 2351 middle-aged twins, a 10-year change in composite cognitive scores derived from five cognitive tests was compared between 903 (38%) twins exposed to surgery classified as major, minor, knee and hip replacement, and other, and a reference group of 1448 (62%) twins without surgery, using linear regression models adjusted for socioeconomic factors. Genetic and shared environmental confounding was addressed in intrapair analyses of 48 monozygotic and 74 dizygotic same-sexed twin pairs.

RESULTS: In individual-level analyses, twins with major surgery (mean difference, -0.37; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.02) or knee and hip replacement surgery (mean difference, -0.54; 95% CI, -1.30 to 0.22) had a tendency of a negligibly higher rate of decline in cognitive score than the reference group. In the intrapair analyses, the surgery-exposed twin had a higher rate of cognitive decline than the co-twin in 55% (95% CI, 45% to 63%) of the pairs. The mean difference in cognitive decline within pairs was -0.21 (95% CI, -0.81 to 0.39).

CONCLUSIONS: No significant associations were found between exposure to surgery and change in cognitive score either in individual-level or in intrapair analyses.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAnnals of Epidemiology
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)95-101.e1
ISSN1047-2797
DOI
StatusUdgivet - feb. 2018

Fingeraftryk

Cognition
Longitudinal Studies
Hip
Linear Models
Knee
Cognitive Dysfunction

Citer dette

@article{e5fed4e22c4c4ad3a24f543639e4e58c,
title = "No impact of surgery on cognitive function: a longitudinal study of middle-aged Danish twins",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To examine the association between exposure to surgery and 10-year change in cognitive functioning.METHODS: Among 2351 middle-aged twins, a 10-year change in composite cognitive scores derived from five cognitive tests was compared between 903 (38{\%}) twins exposed to surgery classified as major, minor, knee and hip replacement, and other, and a reference group of 1448 (62{\%}) twins without surgery, using linear regression models adjusted for socioeconomic factors. Genetic and shared environmental confounding was addressed in intrapair analyses of 48 monozygotic and 74 dizygotic same-sexed twin pairs.RESULTS: In individual-level analyses, twins with major surgery (mean difference, -0.37; 95{\%} CI, -0.76 to 0.02) or knee and hip replacement surgery (mean difference, -0.54; 95{\%} CI, -1.30 to 0.22) had a tendency of a negligibly higher rate of decline in cognitive score than the reference group. In the intrapair analyses, the surgery-exposed twin had a higher rate of cognitive decline than the co-twin in 55{\%} (95{\%} CI, 45{\%} to 63{\%}) of the pairs. The mean difference in cognitive decline within pairs was -0.21 (95{\%} CI, -0.81 to 0.39).CONCLUSIONS: No significant associations were found between exposure to surgery and change in cognitive score either in individual-level or in intrapair analyses.",
keywords = "Journal Article, Postoperative period, Surgery, Aging, Cognition, Cognition Disorders/epidemiology, Geriatric Assessment/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Middle Aged, Twins, Dizygotic, Male, Denmark/epidemiology, Postoperative Complications/epidemiology, Adult, Female, Aged, Cognition/physiology, Longitudinal Studies",
author = "Unni Dokkedal and Mette Wod and Mikael Thinggaard and Hansen, {Tom Giedsing} and Rasmussen, {Lars Simon} and Jonas Mengel-From and Kaare Christensen",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.12.004",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "95--101.e1",
journal = "Annals of Epidemiology",
issn = "1047-2797",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - No impact of surgery on cognitive function

T2 - a longitudinal study of middle-aged Danish twins

AU - Dokkedal, Unni

AU - Wod, Mette

AU - Thinggaard, Mikael

AU - Hansen, Tom Giedsing

AU - Rasmussen, Lars Simon

AU - Mengel-From, Jonas

AU - Christensen, Kaare

N1 - Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - PURPOSE: To examine the association between exposure to surgery and 10-year change in cognitive functioning.METHODS: Among 2351 middle-aged twins, a 10-year change in composite cognitive scores derived from five cognitive tests was compared between 903 (38%) twins exposed to surgery classified as major, minor, knee and hip replacement, and other, and a reference group of 1448 (62%) twins without surgery, using linear regression models adjusted for socioeconomic factors. Genetic and shared environmental confounding was addressed in intrapair analyses of 48 monozygotic and 74 dizygotic same-sexed twin pairs.RESULTS: In individual-level analyses, twins with major surgery (mean difference, -0.37; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.02) or knee and hip replacement surgery (mean difference, -0.54; 95% CI, -1.30 to 0.22) had a tendency of a negligibly higher rate of decline in cognitive score than the reference group. In the intrapair analyses, the surgery-exposed twin had a higher rate of cognitive decline than the co-twin in 55% (95% CI, 45% to 63%) of the pairs. The mean difference in cognitive decline within pairs was -0.21 (95% CI, -0.81 to 0.39).CONCLUSIONS: No significant associations were found between exposure to surgery and change in cognitive score either in individual-level or in intrapair analyses.

AB - PURPOSE: To examine the association between exposure to surgery and 10-year change in cognitive functioning.METHODS: Among 2351 middle-aged twins, a 10-year change in composite cognitive scores derived from five cognitive tests was compared between 903 (38%) twins exposed to surgery classified as major, minor, knee and hip replacement, and other, and a reference group of 1448 (62%) twins without surgery, using linear regression models adjusted for socioeconomic factors. Genetic and shared environmental confounding was addressed in intrapair analyses of 48 monozygotic and 74 dizygotic same-sexed twin pairs.RESULTS: In individual-level analyses, twins with major surgery (mean difference, -0.37; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.02) or knee and hip replacement surgery (mean difference, -0.54; 95% CI, -1.30 to 0.22) had a tendency of a negligibly higher rate of decline in cognitive score than the reference group. In the intrapair analyses, the surgery-exposed twin had a higher rate of cognitive decline than the co-twin in 55% (95% CI, 45% to 63%) of the pairs. The mean difference in cognitive decline within pairs was -0.21 (95% CI, -0.81 to 0.39).CONCLUSIONS: No significant associations were found between exposure to surgery and change in cognitive score either in individual-level or in intrapair analyses.

KW - Journal Article

KW - Postoperative period

KW - Surgery

KW - Aging

KW - Cognition

KW - Cognition Disorders/epidemiology

KW - Geriatric Assessment/statistics & numerical data

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Twins, Dizygotic

KW - Male

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Postoperative Complications/epidemiology

KW - Adult

KW - Female

KW - Aged

KW - Cognition/physiology

KW - Longitudinal Studies

U2 - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.12.004

DO - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.12.004

M3 - Journal article

VL - 28

SP - 95-101.e1

JO - Annals of Epidemiology

JF - Annals of Epidemiology

SN - 1047-2797

IS - 2

ER -