No Evidence for Presence of Bacteria in Modic Type I Changes

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Dec-3
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Radiologica
Vol/bind50
Udgave nummer1
Sider (fra-til)65-70
Antal sider5
ISSN0284-1851
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 3. dec. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Sciatica
Growth
Propionibacterium acnes
Lumbar Vertebrae
Coagulase
Low Back Pain
Microbiology
Agar

Citer dette

@article{5074eba0e16111dd9909000ea68e967b,
title = "No Evidence for Presence of Bacteria in Modic Type I Changes",
abstract = "Background: Recent studies suggest an association between sciatica and Propionibacterium acnes. {"}Modic type I changes{"} in the vertebrae are closely associated with sciatica and lower back pain, and recent studies have questioned the ability of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to differentiate between degenerative Modic type I changes and vertebral abnormalities caused by infection. Purpose: To test whether bacteria could be cultured from biopsies of Modic type I changes. Material and Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with Modic type I changes in lumbar vertebrae had a biopsy taken from the affected vertebra by a strict aseptic procedure. The biopsy was split into two specimens, which were inoculated into thioglycolate agar tubes in the surgical theatre and transported to the microbiology laboratory. In the laboratory, one specimen was streaked onto plates and analyzed for anaerobic and aerobic culture. The other tube was left unopened and incubated directly. Plates and tubes were incubated for 2 weeks and observed for visible growth. Results: None of the biopsies yielded growth of anaerobic bacteria. In one patient, both biopsies yielded growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis, and in another patient coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from one biopsy. Both patients received oral antibiotics without convincing effect on symptoms. Conclusion: Our results showed no evidence of bacteria in vertebrae with Modic type I changes. The isolation of staphylococci from two patients probably represented contamination.",
author = "Niels Wedderkopp and Karsten Thomsen and Claus Manniche and Kolmos, {Hans J{\o}rn} and {Secher Jensen}, Tue and {Leboeuf Yde}, Charlotte",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/02841850802524485",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "65--70",
journal = "Acta Radiologica",
issn = "0284-1851",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "1",

}

No Evidence for Presence of Bacteria in Modic Type I Changes. / Wedderkopp, Niels; Thomsen, Karsten; Manniche, Claus; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Secher Jensen, Tue; Leboeuf Yde, Charlotte.

I: Acta Radiologica, Bind 50, Nr. 1, 03.12.2008, s. 65-70.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - No Evidence for Presence of Bacteria in Modic Type I Changes

AU - Wedderkopp, Niels

AU - Thomsen, Karsten

AU - Manniche, Claus

AU - Kolmos, Hans Jørn

AU - Secher Jensen, Tue

AU - Leboeuf Yde, Charlotte

PY - 2008/12/3

Y1 - 2008/12/3

N2 - Background: Recent studies suggest an association between sciatica and Propionibacterium acnes. "Modic type I changes" in the vertebrae are closely associated with sciatica and lower back pain, and recent studies have questioned the ability of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to differentiate between degenerative Modic type I changes and vertebral abnormalities caused by infection. Purpose: To test whether bacteria could be cultured from biopsies of Modic type I changes. Material and Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with Modic type I changes in lumbar vertebrae had a biopsy taken from the affected vertebra by a strict aseptic procedure. The biopsy was split into two specimens, which were inoculated into thioglycolate agar tubes in the surgical theatre and transported to the microbiology laboratory. In the laboratory, one specimen was streaked onto plates and analyzed for anaerobic and aerobic culture. The other tube was left unopened and incubated directly. Plates and tubes were incubated for 2 weeks and observed for visible growth. Results: None of the biopsies yielded growth of anaerobic bacteria. In one patient, both biopsies yielded growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis, and in another patient coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from one biopsy. Both patients received oral antibiotics without convincing effect on symptoms. Conclusion: Our results showed no evidence of bacteria in vertebrae with Modic type I changes. The isolation of staphylococci from two patients probably represented contamination.

AB - Background: Recent studies suggest an association between sciatica and Propionibacterium acnes. "Modic type I changes" in the vertebrae are closely associated with sciatica and lower back pain, and recent studies have questioned the ability of conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to differentiate between degenerative Modic type I changes and vertebral abnormalities caused by infection. Purpose: To test whether bacteria could be cultured from biopsies of Modic type I changes. Material and Methods: Twenty-four consecutive patients with Modic type I changes in lumbar vertebrae had a biopsy taken from the affected vertebra by a strict aseptic procedure. The biopsy was split into two specimens, which were inoculated into thioglycolate agar tubes in the surgical theatre and transported to the microbiology laboratory. In the laboratory, one specimen was streaked onto plates and analyzed for anaerobic and aerobic culture. The other tube was left unopened and incubated directly. Plates and tubes were incubated for 2 weeks and observed for visible growth. Results: None of the biopsies yielded growth of anaerobic bacteria. In one patient, both biopsies yielded growth of Staphylococcus epidermidis, and in another patient coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from one biopsy. Both patients received oral antibiotics without convincing effect on symptoms. Conclusion: Our results showed no evidence of bacteria in vertebrae with Modic type I changes. The isolation of staphylococci from two patients probably represented contamination.

U2 - 10.1080/02841850802524485

DO - 10.1080/02841850802524485

M3 - Journal article

VL - 50

SP - 65

EP - 70

JO - Acta Radiologica

JF - Acta Radiologica

SN - 0284-1851

IS - 1

ER -