Nitrite spray treatment to promote red color stability of vacuum packaged beef

Xiao Song, Daren Confort, Dick Whittier, Xin Luo*

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Sodium nitrite solutions were sprayed on select grade boneless rib (M. longissimus thoracis) and bottom round (mainly M. biceps femoris) steaks individually, to form bright red nitric oxide myoglobin (NO-Mb) in vacuum packages. Our objective was to determine the optimum level of nitrite in spray or stable raw steak redness, low or no residual nitrite, and low surface pinking (ham-like cured color) after cooking. Results showed that steaks sprayed with 100–350 ppm nitrite solutions had 3.0–3.6 g weight gain and a calculated level of 1.3–5.3 mg nitrite added/kg steak, but very low (b1 ppm) residual nitrite. Nitrite sprays of 250–350 ppm were optimum for raw steak color during 21 days of storage at 1 °C (a* N 10; chroma C* N 16). Raw steak redness was less stable in round than rib. Visual scores for pinkness after cooking were low, indicating that cooked color at even the highest nitrite treatment (350 ppm) was acceptable.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMeat Science
Vol/bind99
Sider (fra-til)8-17
ISSN0309-1740
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2015
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

Song, Xiao ; Confort, Daren ; Whittier, Dick ; Luo, Xin. / Nitrite spray treatment to promote red color stability of vacuum packaged beef. I: Meat Science. 2015 ; Bind 99. s. 8-17.
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title = "Nitrite spray treatment to promote red color stability of vacuum packaged beef",
abstract = "Sodium nitrite solutions were sprayed on select grade boneless rib (M. longissimus thoracis) and bottom round (mainly M. biceps femoris) steaks individually, to form bright red nitric oxide myoglobin (NO-Mb) in vacuum packages. Our objective was to determine the optimum level of nitrite in spray or stable raw steak redness, low or no residual nitrite, and low surface pinking (ham-like cured color) after cooking. Results showed that steaks sprayed with 100–350 ppm nitrite solutions had 3.0–3.6 g weight gain and a calculated level of 1.3–5.3 mg nitrite added/kg steak, but very low (b1 ppm) residual nitrite. Nitrite sprays of 250–350 ppm were optimum for raw steak color during 21 days of storage at 1 °C (a* N 10; chroma C* N 16). Raw steak redness was less stable in round than rib. Visual scores for pinkness after cooking were low, indicating that cooked color at even the highest nitrite treatment (350 ppm) was acceptable.",
author = "Xiao Song and Daren Confort and Dick Whittier and Xin Luo",
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Nitrite spray treatment to promote red color stability of vacuum packaged beef. / Song, Xiao; Confort, Daren; Whittier, Dick; Luo, Xin.

I: Meat Science, Bind 99, 01.2015, s. 8-17.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nitrite spray treatment to promote red color stability of vacuum packaged beef

AU - Song, Xiao

AU - Confort, Daren

AU - Whittier, Dick

AU - Luo, Xin

PY - 2015/1

Y1 - 2015/1

N2 - Sodium nitrite solutions were sprayed on select grade boneless rib (M. longissimus thoracis) and bottom round (mainly M. biceps femoris) steaks individually, to form bright red nitric oxide myoglobin (NO-Mb) in vacuum packages. Our objective was to determine the optimum level of nitrite in spray or stable raw steak redness, low or no residual nitrite, and low surface pinking (ham-like cured color) after cooking. Results showed that steaks sprayed with 100–350 ppm nitrite solutions had 3.0–3.6 g weight gain and a calculated level of 1.3–5.3 mg nitrite added/kg steak, but very low (b1 ppm) residual nitrite. Nitrite sprays of 250–350 ppm were optimum for raw steak color during 21 days of storage at 1 °C (a* N 10; chroma C* N 16). Raw steak redness was less stable in round than rib. Visual scores for pinkness after cooking were low, indicating that cooked color at even the highest nitrite treatment (350 ppm) was acceptable.

AB - Sodium nitrite solutions were sprayed on select grade boneless rib (M. longissimus thoracis) and bottom round (mainly M. biceps femoris) steaks individually, to form bright red nitric oxide myoglobin (NO-Mb) in vacuum packages. Our objective was to determine the optimum level of nitrite in spray or stable raw steak redness, low or no residual nitrite, and low surface pinking (ham-like cured color) after cooking. Results showed that steaks sprayed with 100–350 ppm nitrite solutions had 3.0–3.6 g weight gain and a calculated level of 1.3–5.3 mg nitrite added/kg steak, but very low (b1 ppm) residual nitrite. Nitrite sprays of 250–350 ppm were optimum for raw steak color during 21 days of storage at 1 °C (a* N 10; chroma C* N 16). Raw steak redness was less stable in round than rib. Visual scores for pinkness after cooking were low, indicating that cooked color at even the highest nitrite treatment (350 ppm) was acceptable.

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