Newcomer innovation during entry in a changing organization

Line Revsbæk

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

Resumé

A recent Ph.D. thesis explores newcomer innovation related to organizational entry (Revsbaek, 2014). The study challenges the prevailing assumption in many standardized organizational induction programs that consider newcomers as insecure novices in need of being “taught the ropes” of the organizational culture. Although acknowledging that organizational socialization is about continuity and change in the employing organization (Van Maanen & Schein, 1979), and realizing that the entry of newcomers holds the potential for innovation to the employing organization (Feldman, 2012), the discourse in research on organizational socialization largely heralds the raison d’être of organizational socialization as preserving the culture of the organization from one generation of employees to the next. “Much of the work on organizational socialization still reflects a narrow social perspective: perhaps because of their focus on newcomers, researchers have emphasized how workers adapt to organizations, rather than the reverse” (Moreland, Levine & McMinn, 2001:88). Due to increased job mobility in todays labor markets, organizational newcomers are increasingly more “sophisticated”, that is, more work experienced than the average novice newcomer that is assumed in best practice on employee induction and in the majority of research on organizational socialization (Daskalaki, 2012). Articulating innovation in relation to the organizational entry of newcomers is still a minority perspective in the research on organizational socialization although an increasing number of studies highlight the innovation potential of organizational entry processes (for example Daskalaki, 2012; Sprogoee & Elkjaer, 2010; Revsbaek, 2014). Furthermore, when the innovation potential of newcomer entry is articulated, it is often done so in terms of the newcomer disrupting a stable organizational operation, implying a stability of that which the newcomers enter. “Firms can use the entry of newcomers to ‘unfreeze’ the workgroup, that is, as an opportunity to rethink work processes, patterns of social interaction, and even the group’s core values and beliefs” (Feldman, 2012:215). Thus, the “workgroup”, “work processes”, “patterns of social interaction” and “core values” are considered stable units of analysis, which entries of organizational newcomers might affect. This gives rise to a dichotomy of newcomer assimilation versus organizational accommodation to organize much of the research on organizational socialization and innovation. The case study presented in this paper investigates organizational entry in a changing organization raising the question of how to understand organizational socialization and newcomer innovation when the cultural coherence and stability is shattered, in flux, changing. The case organization is a global Danish production company and the case study entries take place in company support functions in departments of HR, Legal and Supply Change Management. Theoretical approach: The study introduces process philosophy to research on organizational socialization and is the first to approach the organizational entry dynamics between newcomers and veterans from a complexity theory perspective of complex responsive processes (Stacey, 2010) among others drawing on G. H. Mead’s pragmatic social behaviorism (1934). Methodology: Data is collected in participant observations of company induction seminars and e-learning programs and in a longitudinal multi-perspective interview design exploring the experience of newcomers, veteran coworkers and hiring managers from their shared work-related interactions during entry. The case study materials are analyzed from an abductive, breakdown-driven (Alvesson & Kärreman, 2011) methodology of Analyzing in the Present (Revsbaek & Tanggaard, 2015) capturing the rich dynamics of interview stories generated in the multi-perspective interview design. Conclusion and Findings: The study suggests replacing the prevailing dichotomy of ‘newcomer assimilation’ versus ‘organizational accommodation’ that structures much research and debate on innovation related to organizational entries, with a notion of ‘adjusting to the emergent’ in relation to organizational entry in changing organizations. Identifying that newcomers orient themselves toward organizational change themes, ‘newcomer innovation’ is understood as the work-related acting of newcomer that constitutes simultaneous socialization with regard to perceived desired change and innovation of habitual practice. ‘Newcomer innovation’ is portrayed as the spontaneous, accepted and situational gesture of newcomer in ‘resonant instances’ of newcomer enacting the organizational emergent in collaborations with organizational veterans. The study argues for considering the local, informal socialization in work-related interactions between newcomer and veterans as a primary arena in employee induction. Early involvement of newcomers in the organizational practice and process of production is viewed a necessary prerequisite for the occurrence of newcomer innovation. It is suggested that hiring managers, veteran coworkers and newcomers pay attention to resonant instances in which individual professional biographies are enacted as organizational practice thus contributing to variation in practice, possibly furthering change or consolidating continuity in the organization. Hiring managers who wish to further innovation related to the entry of newcomers may consider engaging their newcomers in 1) strategically important assignments and/or 2) assignments aimed at innovating practice or 3) assignments previously unknown and recently introduced to the department portfolio.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato1. aug. 2015
Antal sider3
StatusUdgivet - 1. aug. 2015
BegivenhedEuropean Educational Research Association: Education and Transition - Contributions from Educational Research - Budapest, Danmark
Varighed: 7. sep. 201511. sep. 2015

Konference

KonferenceEuropean Educational Research Association
LandDanmark
ByBudapest
Periode07/09/201511/09/2015

Emneord

  • Employee induction
  • newcomer innovation
  • organizational socialization

Citer dette

Revsbæk, L. (2015). Newcomer innovation during entry in a changing organization. Afhandling præsenteret på European Educational Research Association, Budapest, Danmark.
Revsbæk, Line. / Newcomer innovation during entry in a changing organization. Afhandling præsenteret på European Educational Research Association, Budapest, Danmark.3 s.
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abstract = "A recent Ph.D. thesis explores newcomer innovation related to organizational entry (Revsbaek, 2014). The study challenges the prevailing assumption in many standardized organizational induction programs that consider newcomers as insecure novices in need of being “taught the ropes” of the organizational culture. Although acknowledging that organizational socialization is about continuity and change in the employing organization (Van Maanen & Schein, 1979), and realizing that the entry of newcomers holds the potential for innovation to the employing organization (Feldman, 2012), the discourse in research on organizational socialization largely heralds the raison d’{\^e}tre of organizational socialization as preserving the culture of the organization from one generation of employees to the next. “Much of the work on organizational socialization still reflects a narrow social perspective: perhaps because of their focus on newcomers, researchers have emphasized how workers adapt to organizations, rather than the reverse” (Moreland, Levine & McMinn, 2001:88). Due to increased job mobility in todays labor markets, organizational newcomers are increasingly more “sophisticated”, that is, more work experienced than the average novice newcomer that is assumed in best practice on employee induction and in the majority of research on organizational socialization (Daskalaki, 2012). Articulating innovation in relation to the organizational entry of newcomers is still a minority perspective in the research on organizational socialization although an increasing number of studies highlight the innovation potential of organizational entry processes (for example Daskalaki, 2012; Sprogoee & Elkjaer, 2010; Revsbaek, 2014). Furthermore, when the innovation potential of newcomer entry is articulated, it is often done so in terms of the newcomer disrupting a stable organizational operation, implying a stability of that which the newcomers enter. “Firms can use the entry of newcomers to ‘unfreeze’ the workgroup, that is, as an opportunity to rethink work processes, patterns of social interaction, and even the group’s core values and beliefs” (Feldman, 2012:215). Thus, the “workgroup”, “work processes”, “patterns of social interaction” and “core values” are considered stable units of analysis, which entries of organizational newcomers might affect. This gives rise to a dichotomy of newcomer assimilation versus organizational accommodation to organize much of the research on organizational socialization and innovation. The case study presented in this paper investigates organizational entry in a changing organization raising the question of how to understand organizational socialization and newcomer innovation when the cultural coherence and stability is shattered, in flux, changing. The case organization is a global Danish production company and the case study entries take place in company support functions in departments of HR, Legal and Supply Change Management. Theoretical approach: The study introduces process philosophy to research on organizational socialization and is the first to approach the organizational entry dynamics between newcomers and veterans from a complexity theory perspective of complex responsive processes (Stacey, 2010) among others drawing on G. H. Mead’s pragmatic social behaviorism (1934). Methodology: Data is collected in participant observations of company induction seminars and e-learning programs and in a longitudinal multi-perspective interview design exploring the experience of newcomers, veteran coworkers and hiring managers from their shared work-related interactions during entry. The case study materials are analyzed from an abductive, breakdown-driven (Alvesson & K{\"a}rreman, 2011) methodology of Analyzing in the Present (Revsbaek & Tanggaard, 2015) capturing the rich dynamics of interview stories generated in the multi-perspective interview design. Conclusion and Findings: The study suggests replacing the prevailing dichotomy of ‘newcomer assimilation’ versus ‘organizational accommodation’ that structures much research and debate on innovation related to organizational entries, with a notion of ‘adjusting to the emergent’ in relation to organizational entry in changing organizations. Identifying that newcomers orient themselves toward organizational change themes, ‘newcomer innovation’ is understood as the work-related acting of newcomer that constitutes simultaneous socialization with regard to perceived desired change and innovation of habitual practice. ‘Newcomer innovation’ is portrayed as the spontaneous, accepted and situational gesture of newcomer in ‘resonant instances’ of newcomer enacting the organizational emergent in collaborations with organizational veterans. The study argues for considering the local, informal socialization in work-related interactions between newcomer and veterans as a primary arena in employee induction. Early involvement of newcomers in the organizational practice and process of production is viewed a necessary prerequisite for the occurrence of newcomer innovation. It is suggested that hiring managers, veteran coworkers and newcomers pay attention to resonant instances in which individual professional biographies are enacted as organizational practice thus contributing to variation in practice, possibly furthering change or consolidating continuity in the organization. Hiring managers who wish to further innovation related to the entry of newcomers may consider engaging their newcomers in 1) strategically important assignments and/or 2) assignments aimed at innovating practice or 3) assignments previously unknown and recently introduced to the department portfolio.",
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Revsbæk, L 2015, 'Newcomer innovation during entry in a changing organization' Paper fremlagt ved European Educational Research Association, Budapest, Danmark, 07/09/2015 - 11/09/2015, .

Newcomer innovation during entry in a changing organization. / Revsbæk, Line.

2015. Afhandling præsenteret på European Educational Research Association, Budapest, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

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AU - Revsbæk, Line

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N2 - A recent Ph.D. thesis explores newcomer innovation related to organizational entry (Revsbaek, 2014). The study challenges the prevailing assumption in many standardized organizational induction programs that consider newcomers as insecure novices in need of being “taught the ropes” of the organizational culture. Although acknowledging that organizational socialization is about continuity and change in the employing organization (Van Maanen & Schein, 1979), and realizing that the entry of newcomers holds the potential for innovation to the employing organization (Feldman, 2012), the discourse in research on organizational socialization largely heralds the raison d’être of organizational socialization as preserving the culture of the organization from one generation of employees to the next. “Much of the work on organizational socialization still reflects a narrow social perspective: perhaps because of their focus on newcomers, researchers have emphasized how workers adapt to organizations, rather than the reverse” (Moreland, Levine & McMinn, 2001:88). Due to increased job mobility in todays labor markets, organizational newcomers are increasingly more “sophisticated”, that is, more work experienced than the average novice newcomer that is assumed in best practice on employee induction and in the majority of research on organizational socialization (Daskalaki, 2012). Articulating innovation in relation to the organizational entry of newcomers is still a minority perspective in the research on organizational socialization although an increasing number of studies highlight the innovation potential of organizational entry processes (for example Daskalaki, 2012; Sprogoee & Elkjaer, 2010; Revsbaek, 2014). Furthermore, when the innovation potential of newcomer entry is articulated, it is often done so in terms of the newcomer disrupting a stable organizational operation, implying a stability of that which the newcomers enter. “Firms can use the entry of newcomers to ‘unfreeze’ the workgroup, that is, as an opportunity to rethink work processes, patterns of social interaction, and even the group’s core values and beliefs” (Feldman, 2012:215). Thus, the “workgroup”, “work processes”, “patterns of social interaction” and “core values” are considered stable units of analysis, which entries of organizational newcomers might affect. This gives rise to a dichotomy of newcomer assimilation versus organizational accommodation to organize much of the research on organizational socialization and innovation. The case study presented in this paper investigates organizational entry in a changing organization raising the question of how to understand organizational socialization and newcomer innovation when the cultural coherence and stability is shattered, in flux, changing. The case organization is a global Danish production company and the case study entries take place in company support functions in departments of HR, Legal and Supply Change Management. Theoretical approach: The study introduces process philosophy to research on organizational socialization and is the first to approach the organizational entry dynamics between newcomers and veterans from a complexity theory perspective of complex responsive processes (Stacey, 2010) among others drawing on G. H. Mead’s pragmatic social behaviorism (1934). Methodology: Data is collected in participant observations of company induction seminars and e-learning programs and in a longitudinal multi-perspective interview design exploring the experience of newcomers, veteran coworkers and hiring managers from their shared work-related interactions during entry. The case study materials are analyzed from an abductive, breakdown-driven (Alvesson & Kärreman, 2011) methodology of Analyzing in the Present (Revsbaek & Tanggaard, 2015) capturing the rich dynamics of interview stories generated in the multi-perspective interview design. Conclusion and Findings: The study suggests replacing the prevailing dichotomy of ‘newcomer assimilation’ versus ‘organizational accommodation’ that structures much research and debate on innovation related to organizational entries, with a notion of ‘adjusting to the emergent’ in relation to organizational entry in changing organizations. Identifying that newcomers orient themselves toward organizational change themes, ‘newcomer innovation’ is understood as the work-related acting of newcomer that constitutes simultaneous socialization with regard to perceived desired change and innovation of habitual practice. ‘Newcomer innovation’ is portrayed as the spontaneous, accepted and situational gesture of newcomer in ‘resonant instances’ of newcomer enacting the organizational emergent in collaborations with organizational veterans. The study argues for considering the local, informal socialization in work-related interactions between newcomer and veterans as a primary arena in employee induction. Early involvement of newcomers in the organizational practice and process of production is viewed a necessary prerequisite for the occurrence of newcomer innovation. It is suggested that hiring managers, veteran coworkers and newcomers pay attention to resonant instances in which individual professional biographies are enacted as organizational practice thus contributing to variation in practice, possibly furthering change or consolidating continuity in the organization. Hiring managers who wish to further innovation related to the entry of newcomers may consider engaging their newcomers in 1) strategically important assignments and/or 2) assignments aimed at innovating practice or 3) assignments previously unknown and recently introduced to the department portfolio.

AB - A recent Ph.D. thesis explores newcomer innovation related to organizational entry (Revsbaek, 2014). The study challenges the prevailing assumption in many standardized organizational induction programs that consider newcomers as insecure novices in need of being “taught the ropes” of the organizational culture. Although acknowledging that organizational socialization is about continuity and change in the employing organization (Van Maanen & Schein, 1979), and realizing that the entry of newcomers holds the potential for innovation to the employing organization (Feldman, 2012), the discourse in research on organizational socialization largely heralds the raison d’être of organizational socialization as preserving the culture of the organization from one generation of employees to the next. “Much of the work on organizational socialization still reflects a narrow social perspective: perhaps because of their focus on newcomers, researchers have emphasized how workers adapt to organizations, rather than the reverse” (Moreland, Levine & McMinn, 2001:88). Due to increased job mobility in todays labor markets, organizational newcomers are increasingly more “sophisticated”, that is, more work experienced than the average novice newcomer that is assumed in best practice on employee induction and in the majority of research on organizational socialization (Daskalaki, 2012). Articulating innovation in relation to the organizational entry of newcomers is still a minority perspective in the research on organizational socialization although an increasing number of studies highlight the innovation potential of organizational entry processes (for example Daskalaki, 2012; Sprogoee & Elkjaer, 2010; Revsbaek, 2014). Furthermore, when the innovation potential of newcomer entry is articulated, it is often done so in terms of the newcomer disrupting a stable organizational operation, implying a stability of that which the newcomers enter. “Firms can use the entry of newcomers to ‘unfreeze’ the workgroup, that is, as an opportunity to rethink work processes, patterns of social interaction, and even the group’s core values and beliefs” (Feldman, 2012:215). Thus, the “workgroup”, “work processes”, “patterns of social interaction” and “core values” are considered stable units of analysis, which entries of organizational newcomers might affect. This gives rise to a dichotomy of newcomer assimilation versus organizational accommodation to organize much of the research on organizational socialization and innovation. The case study presented in this paper investigates organizational entry in a changing organization raising the question of how to understand organizational socialization and newcomer innovation when the cultural coherence and stability is shattered, in flux, changing. The case organization is a global Danish production company and the case study entries take place in company support functions in departments of HR, Legal and Supply Change Management. Theoretical approach: The study introduces process philosophy to research on organizational socialization and is the first to approach the organizational entry dynamics between newcomers and veterans from a complexity theory perspective of complex responsive processes (Stacey, 2010) among others drawing on G. H. Mead’s pragmatic social behaviorism (1934). Methodology: Data is collected in participant observations of company induction seminars and e-learning programs and in a longitudinal multi-perspective interview design exploring the experience of newcomers, veteran coworkers and hiring managers from their shared work-related interactions during entry. The case study materials are analyzed from an abductive, breakdown-driven (Alvesson & Kärreman, 2011) methodology of Analyzing in the Present (Revsbaek & Tanggaard, 2015) capturing the rich dynamics of interview stories generated in the multi-perspective interview design. Conclusion and Findings: The study suggests replacing the prevailing dichotomy of ‘newcomer assimilation’ versus ‘organizational accommodation’ that structures much research and debate on innovation related to organizational entries, with a notion of ‘adjusting to the emergent’ in relation to organizational entry in changing organizations. Identifying that newcomers orient themselves toward organizational change themes, ‘newcomer innovation’ is understood as the work-related acting of newcomer that constitutes simultaneous socialization with regard to perceived desired change and innovation of habitual practice. ‘Newcomer innovation’ is portrayed as the spontaneous, accepted and situational gesture of newcomer in ‘resonant instances’ of newcomer enacting the organizational emergent in collaborations with organizational veterans. The study argues for considering the local, informal socialization in work-related interactions between newcomer and veterans as a primary arena in employee induction. Early involvement of newcomers in the organizational practice and process of production is viewed a necessary prerequisite for the occurrence of newcomer innovation. It is suggested that hiring managers, veteran coworkers and newcomers pay attention to resonant instances in which individual professional biographies are enacted as organizational practice thus contributing to variation in practice, possibly furthering change or consolidating continuity in the organization. Hiring managers who wish to further innovation related to the entry of newcomers may consider engaging their newcomers in 1) strategically important assignments and/or 2) assignments aimed at innovating practice or 3) assignments previously unknown and recently introduced to the department portfolio.

KW - Employee induction

KW - newcomer innovation

KW - organizational socialization

M3 - Paper

ER -

Revsbæk L. Newcomer innovation during entry in a changing organization. 2015. Afhandling præsenteret på European Educational Research Association, Budapest, Danmark.