Neuroethology of ultrasonic hearing in nocturnal butterflies (Hedyloidea)

Jayne E. Yack, Elisabeth K.V. Kalko, Annemarie Surlykke

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

 
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology
Vol/bind193
Sider (fra-til)577-590
Antal sider14
ISSN0340-7594
StatusUdgivet - 2007

Fingeraftryk

hearing
Ultrasonics
butterfly
butterflies
Hearing
ears
ultrasonics
membrane
behavioral response
bat
flight
physiology
cavity
insect
Membranes
Chiroptera
nerve tissue
ultrasound
insects

Emneord

  • Sommerfugle
  • hørelse

Citer dette

@article{69b37700dae411dc860c000ea68e967b,
title = "Neuroethology of ultrasonic hearing in nocturnal butterflies (Hedyloidea)",
abstract = "Nocturnal Hedyloidea butterflies possess ultrasound-sensitive ears that mediate evasive flight maneuvers.Tympanal ear morphology, auditory physiology and behavioural responses to ultrasound are described forMacrosoma heliconiaria, and evidence for hearing is described for eight other hedylid species. The ear is formedby modifications of the cubital and subcostal veins at the forewing base, where the thin (1-3 m), ovoid (520 £ 220)mpanal membrane occurs in a cavity. The ear is innervated by nerve IIN1c, with three chordotonal organsattaching to separate regions of the tympanal membrane. Extracellular recordings from IIN1c reveal sensoryresponses to ultrasonic (>20 kHz), but not low frequency(<10 kHz) sounds. Hearing is broadly tuned to frequencies between 40 and 80 kHz, with best thresholds around 60 dB SPL. Free flying butterflies exposed to ultrasound exhibit avariety of evasive maneuvers, characterized by sudden and unpredictable changes in direction, increased velocity, anddurations of »500 ms. Hedylid hearing is compared to that of several other insects that have independently evolved ears for the same purpose-bat detection. Hedylid hearing may also represent an interesting example of evolutionarydivergence, since we demonstrate that the ears are homologous to low frequency ears in some diurnal Nymphalidaebutterflies.",
keywords = "Sommerfugle, h{\o}relse, Lepidoptera, Butterflies, hearing",
author = "Yack, {Jayne E.} and Kalko, {Elisabeth K.V.} and Annemarie Surlykke",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
volume = "193",
pages = "577--590",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology",
issn = "0340-7594",
publisher = "Heinemann",

}

Neuroethology of ultrasonic hearing in nocturnal butterflies (Hedyloidea). / Yack, Jayne E.; Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.; Surlykke, Annemarie.

I: Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, Bind 193, 2007, s. 577-590.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neuroethology of ultrasonic hearing in nocturnal butterflies (Hedyloidea)

AU - Yack, Jayne E.

AU - Kalko, Elisabeth K.V.

AU - Surlykke, Annemarie

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Nocturnal Hedyloidea butterflies possess ultrasound-sensitive ears that mediate evasive flight maneuvers.Tympanal ear morphology, auditory physiology and behavioural responses to ultrasound are described forMacrosoma heliconiaria, and evidence for hearing is described for eight other hedylid species. The ear is formedby modifications of the cubital and subcostal veins at the forewing base, where the thin (1-3 m), ovoid (520 £ 220)mpanal membrane occurs in a cavity. The ear is innervated by nerve IIN1c, with three chordotonal organsattaching to separate regions of the tympanal membrane. Extracellular recordings from IIN1c reveal sensoryresponses to ultrasonic (>20 kHz), but not low frequency(<10 kHz) sounds. Hearing is broadly tuned to frequencies between 40 and 80 kHz, with best thresholds around 60 dB SPL. Free flying butterflies exposed to ultrasound exhibit avariety of evasive maneuvers, characterized by sudden and unpredictable changes in direction, increased velocity, anddurations of »500 ms. Hedylid hearing is compared to that of several other insects that have independently evolved ears for the same purpose-bat detection. Hedylid hearing may also represent an interesting example of evolutionarydivergence, since we demonstrate that the ears are homologous to low frequency ears in some diurnal Nymphalidaebutterflies.

AB - Nocturnal Hedyloidea butterflies possess ultrasound-sensitive ears that mediate evasive flight maneuvers.Tympanal ear morphology, auditory physiology and behavioural responses to ultrasound are described forMacrosoma heliconiaria, and evidence for hearing is described for eight other hedylid species. The ear is formedby modifications of the cubital and subcostal veins at the forewing base, where the thin (1-3 m), ovoid (520 £ 220)mpanal membrane occurs in a cavity. The ear is innervated by nerve IIN1c, with three chordotonal organsattaching to separate regions of the tympanal membrane. Extracellular recordings from IIN1c reveal sensoryresponses to ultrasonic (>20 kHz), but not low frequency(<10 kHz) sounds. Hearing is broadly tuned to frequencies between 40 and 80 kHz, with best thresholds around 60 dB SPL. Free flying butterflies exposed to ultrasound exhibit avariety of evasive maneuvers, characterized by sudden and unpredictable changes in direction, increased velocity, anddurations of »500 ms. Hedylid hearing is compared to that of several other insects that have independently evolved ears for the same purpose-bat detection. Hedylid hearing may also represent an interesting example of evolutionarydivergence, since we demonstrate that the ears are homologous to low frequency ears in some diurnal Nymphalidaebutterflies.

KW - Sommerfugle

KW - hørelse

KW - Lepidoptera

KW - Butterflies

KW - hearing

M3 - Journal article

VL - 193

SP - 577

EP - 590

JO - Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

JF - Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology

SN - 0340-7594

ER -