Networking intensity and social skills among nascent entrepreneurs

A three year longitudinal study

Kim Klyver, Pia Arenius

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

Resumé

In entrepreneurship, one of the enduring questions is why some entrepreneurs manage to start their business while others quit and disbanding the start-up process. Starting a new business is often characterized by resource constraints, and resource acquisition plays an essential part in overcoming these constraints (Starr and MacMillan 1990; Villanueva et al. 2012). Acquiring resources is fundamentally a social process in which entrepreneurs interact with people around them (Larson and Starr 1992; Stuart, Hoang and Hybels 1999; Baron and Markman 2003). Recently, explanations of entrepreneurs’ resource acquisition and the subsequent start-up success or failure has moved from explanations related to structural characteristics of social networks (e.g. Newbert et al. 2013; Stam et al. 2014) towards psychological explanations related to the individuals abilities to create, maintain and benefit from social networks; their social skills (e.g. Baron & Markman 2003; Baron and Tang 2009; Tocher et al. 2015). Social skills reflects “… both interpersonal perceptiveness and the capacity to adjust one’s behavior to different and changing situational demands and to effectively influence and control the responses of others” (Witt and Ferris 2003: 811). Despite the important contributions of the psychological literature on social skills, this social skill hypothesis continues to ignore the behavioural aspects that create network structures and the following behaviour that enables entrepreneurs to obtain information and resources necessary to successfully starting their business. We argue it is necessary to understand the social skills together with behaviour; skills alone make no difference and therefore actions are needed (McMullen and Shepherd 2006; Autio et al. 2013). Following ideas and anecdotal evidence on networking behaviour (e.g. Anderson and Jack 2002; Anderson, Dodd and Jack 2010), we argue that networking behaviour in form of networking intensity impacts whether entrepreneurs successfully manage to start their business or not. We understand network intensity as the activities level of interaction with a broad range of role relations (e.g. family, friends, colleagues, etc.). We further argue that the impact of network intensity is dependent on the social skills of entrepreneurs. If entrepreneurs have low social skills they will benefit less from their interaction with network contacts because they are less capable of adapting their behaviour and influencing the response of others. Therefore, the impact of network intensity will be reduced. On the other hand, if they have high social skills their capability to adapt their behaviour to specific situations and their capability to influence others enable them to benefit from their interactions with network contacts. In this situation, the impact of network intensity on start-up success will be increased.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2018
StatusUdgivet - 2018
BegivenhedACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange - Brisbane, Australien
Varighed: 5. feb. 20186. feb. 2018

Konference

KonferenceACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange
LandAustralien
ByBrisbane
Periode05/02/201806/02/2018

Fingeraftryk

Networking
Longitudinal study
Nascent entrepreneurs
Social skills
Entrepreneurs
Start-up
Interaction
Resource acquisition
Social networks
Psychological
Resources
Social processes
New business
Quits
Network structure
Resource constraints
Entrepreneurship

Citer dette

Klyver, K., & Arenius, P. (2018). Networking intensity and social skills among nascent entrepreneurs: A three year longitudinal study. Afhandling præsenteret på ACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, Brisbane, Australien.
Klyver, Kim ; Arenius, Pia. / Networking intensity and social skills among nascent entrepreneurs : A three year longitudinal study. Afhandling præsenteret på ACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, Brisbane, Australien.
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Klyver, K & Arenius, P 2018, 'Networking intensity and social skills among nascent entrepreneurs: A three year longitudinal study' Paper fremlagt ved ACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, Brisbane, Australien, 05/02/2018 - 06/02/2018, .

Networking intensity and social skills among nascent entrepreneurs : A three year longitudinal study. / Klyver, Kim; Arenius, Pia.

2018. Afhandling præsenteret på ACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, Brisbane, Australien.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Networking intensity and social skills among nascent entrepreneurs

T2 - A three year longitudinal study

AU - Klyver, Kim

AU - Arenius, Pia

PY - 2018

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N2 - In entrepreneurship, one of the enduring questions is why some entrepreneurs manage to start their business while others quit and disbanding the start-up process. Starting a new business is often characterized by resource constraints, and resource acquisition plays an essential part in overcoming these constraints (Starr and MacMillan 1990; Villanueva et al. 2012). Acquiring resources is fundamentally a social process in which entrepreneurs interact with people around them (Larson and Starr 1992; Stuart, Hoang and Hybels 1999; Baron and Markman 2003). Recently, explanations of entrepreneurs’ resource acquisition and the subsequent start-up success or failure has moved from explanations related to structural characteristics of social networks (e.g. Newbert et al. 2013; Stam et al. 2014) towards psychological explanations related to the individuals abilities to create, maintain and benefit from social networks; their social skills (e.g. Baron & Markman 2003; Baron and Tang 2009; Tocher et al. 2015). Social skills reflects “… both interpersonal perceptiveness and the capacity to adjust one’s behavior to different and changing situational demands and to effectively influence and control the responses of others” (Witt and Ferris 2003: 811). Despite the important contributions of the psychological literature on social skills, this social skill hypothesis continues to ignore the behavioural aspects that create network structures and the following behaviour that enables entrepreneurs to obtain information and resources necessary to successfully starting their business. We argue it is necessary to understand the social skills together with behaviour; skills alone make no difference and therefore actions are needed (McMullen and Shepherd 2006; Autio et al. 2013). Following ideas and anecdotal evidence on networking behaviour (e.g. Anderson and Jack 2002; Anderson, Dodd and Jack 2010), we argue that networking behaviour in form of networking intensity impacts whether entrepreneurs successfully manage to start their business or not. We understand network intensity as the activities level of interaction with a broad range of role relations (e.g. family, friends, colleagues, etc.). We further argue that the impact of network intensity is dependent on the social skills of entrepreneurs. If entrepreneurs have low social skills they will benefit less from their interaction with network contacts because they are less capable of adapting their behaviour and influencing the response of others. Therefore, the impact of network intensity will be reduced. On the other hand, if they have high social skills their capability to adapt their behaviour to specific situations and their capability to influence others enable them to benefit from their interactions with network contacts. In this situation, the impact of network intensity on start-up success will be increased.

AB - In entrepreneurship, one of the enduring questions is why some entrepreneurs manage to start their business while others quit and disbanding the start-up process. Starting a new business is often characterized by resource constraints, and resource acquisition plays an essential part in overcoming these constraints (Starr and MacMillan 1990; Villanueva et al. 2012). Acquiring resources is fundamentally a social process in which entrepreneurs interact with people around them (Larson and Starr 1992; Stuart, Hoang and Hybels 1999; Baron and Markman 2003). Recently, explanations of entrepreneurs’ resource acquisition and the subsequent start-up success or failure has moved from explanations related to structural characteristics of social networks (e.g. Newbert et al. 2013; Stam et al. 2014) towards psychological explanations related to the individuals abilities to create, maintain and benefit from social networks; their social skills (e.g. Baron & Markman 2003; Baron and Tang 2009; Tocher et al. 2015). Social skills reflects “… both interpersonal perceptiveness and the capacity to adjust one’s behavior to different and changing situational demands and to effectively influence and control the responses of others” (Witt and Ferris 2003: 811). Despite the important contributions of the psychological literature on social skills, this social skill hypothesis continues to ignore the behavioural aspects that create network structures and the following behaviour that enables entrepreneurs to obtain information and resources necessary to successfully starting their business. We argue it is necessary to understand the social skills together with behaviour; skills alone make no difference and therefore actions are needed (McMullen and Shepherd 2006; Autio et al. 2013). Following ideas and anecdotal evidence on networking behaviour (e.g. Anderson and Jack 2002; Anderson, Dodd and Jack 2010), we argue that networking behaviour in form of networking intensity impacts whether entrepreneurs successfully manage to start their business or not. We understand network intensity as the activities level of interaction with a broad range of role relations (e.g. family, friends, colleagues, etc.). We further argue that the impact of network intensity is dependent on the social skills of entrepreneurs. If entrepreneurs have low social skills they will benefit less from their interaction with network contacts because they are less capable of adapting their behaviour and influencing the response of others. Therefore, the impact of network intensity will be reduced. On the other hand, if they have high social skills their capability to adapt their behaviour to specific situations and their capability to influence others enable them to benefit from their interactions with network contacts. In this situation, the impact of network intensity on start-up success will be increased.

M3 - Paper

ER -

Klyver K, Arenius P. Networking intensity and social skills among nascent entrepreneurs: A three year longitudinal study. 2018. Afhandling præsenteret på ACERE, Australian Centre for Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, Brisbane, Australien.