Muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only: a two to five-year followup

Eva Ageberg, Roland Thomeé, Camille Neeter, Karin Grävare Silbernagel, Ewa Roos

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Dec-15
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftArthritis & Rheumatism
Vol/bind59
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)1773-9
Antal sider6
ISSN0004-3591
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 15. dec. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Humulus
Muscles
Leg
Knee
Knee Osteoarthritis
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Wounds and Injuries
Randomized Controlled Trials

Citer dette

@article{95549640e2f011dd990c000ea68e967b,
title = "Muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only: a two to five-year followup",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To study muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury with or without surgical reconstruction 2 to 5 years after injury. Good muscle function is important in preventing early-onset osteoarthritis (OA), but the role of reconstructive surgery in restoring muscle function is unclear. METHODS: Of 121 patients with ACL injury included in a randomized controlled trial on training and surgical reconstruction versus training only (the Knee, Anterior cruciate ligament, NON-surgical versus surgical treatment [KANON] study, ISRCTN: 84752559), 54 (mean age at followup 30 years, range 20-39, 28{\%} women) were assessed a mean +/- SD of 3 +/- 0.9 years after injury with reliable, valid, and responsive test batteries for strength (knee extension, knee flexion, leg press) and hop performance (vertical jump, one-leg hop, side hop). The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI; injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value and absolute values were used for comparisons between groups (analysis of variance). An LSI >or=90{\%} was considered normal. RESULTS: There were no differences between the surgical and nonsurgical treatment groups in muscle strength or functional performance. Between 44{\%} and 89{\%} of subjects had normal muscle function in the single tests, and between 44{\%} and 56{\%} had normal function in the test batteries. CONCLUSION: The lack of differences between patients treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only indicates that reconstructive surgery is not a prerequisite for restoring muscle function. Abnormal muscle function, found in approximately one-third or more of the patients, may be a predictor of future knee OA.",
author = "Eva Ageberg and Roland Thome{\'e} and Camille Neeter and Silbernagel, {Karin Gr{\"a}vare} and Ewa Roos",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1002/art.24066",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "1773--9",
journal = "Arthritis & Rheumatology",
issn = "2326-5191",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "12",

}

Muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only: a two to five-year followup. / Ageberg, Eva; Thomeé, Roland; Neeter, Camille; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Roos, Ewa.

I: Arthritis & Rheumatism, Bind 59, Nr. 12, 15.12.2008, s. 1773-9.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only: a two to five-year followup

AU - Ageberg, Eva

AU - Thomeé, Roland

AU - Neeter, Camille

AU - Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

AU - Roos, Ewa

PY - 2008/12/15

Y1 - 2008/12/15

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To study muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury with or without surgical reconstruction 2 to 5 years after injury. Good muscle function is important in preventing early-onset osteoarthritis (OA), but the role of reconstructive surgery in restoring muscle function is unclear. METHODS: Of 121 patients with ACL injury included in a randomized controlled trial on training and surgical reconstruction versus training only (the Knee, Anterior cruciate ligament, NON-surgical versus surgical treatment [KANON] study, ISRCTN: 84752559), 54 (mean age at followup 30 years, range 20-39, 28% women) were assessed a mean +/- SD of 3 +/- 0.9 years after injury with reliable, valid, and responsive test batteries for strength (knee extension, knee flexion, leg press) and hop performance (vertical jump, one-leg hop, side hop). The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI; injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value and absolute values were used for comparisons between groups (analysis of variance). An LSI >or=90% was considered normal. RESULTS: There were no differences between the surgical and nonsurgical treatment groups in muscle strength or functional performance. Between 44% and 89% of subjects had normal muscle function in the single tests, and between 44% and 56% had normal function in the test batteries. CONCLUSION: The lack of differences between patients treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only indicates that reconstructive surgery is not a prerequisite for restoring muscle function. Abnormal muscle function, found in approximately one-third or more of the patients, may be a predictor of future knee OA.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To study muscle strength and functional performance in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury with or without surgical reconstruction 2 to 5 years after injury. Good muscle function is important in preventing early-onset osteoarthritis (OA), but the role of reconstructive surgery in restoring muscle function is unclear. METHODS: Of 121 patients with ACL injury included in a randomized controlled trial on training and surgical reconstruction versus training only (the Knee, Anterior cruciate ligament, NON-surgical versus surgical treatment [KANON] study, ISRCTN: 84752559), 54 (mean age at followup 30 years, range 20-39, 28% women) were assessed a mean +/- SD of 3 +/- 0.9 years after injury with reliable, valid, and responsive test batteries for strength (knee extension, knee flexion, leg press) and hop performance (vertical jump, one-leg hop, side hop). The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI; injured leg divided by uninjured and multiplied by 100) value and absolute values were used for comparisons between groups (analysis of variance). An LSI >or=90% was considered normal. RESULTS: There were no differences between the surgical and nonsurgical treatment groups in muscle strength or functional performance. Between 44% and 89% of subjects had normal muscle function in the single tests, and between 44% and 56% had normal function in the test batteries. CONCLUSION: The lack of differences between patients treated with training and surgical reconstruction or training only indicates that reconstructive surgery is not a prerequisite for restoring muscle function. Abnormal muscle function, found in approximately one-third or more of the patients, may be a predictor of future knee OA.

U2 - 10.1002/art.24066

DO - 10.1002/art.24066

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19035430

VL - 59

SP - 1773

EP - 1779

JO - Arthritis & Rheumatology

JF - Arthritis & Rheumatology

SN - 2326-5191

IS - 12

ER -