Multifunctional centers in rural areas

Fabrics of social and human capital

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskning

Resumé

In the Nordic welfare states (Island, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark), an important principle has hitherto been to allow all citizens access to the same high-quality public services - independent of whether they live in urban or rural areas. In Denmark, however, this principle is gradually being abandoned. One outcome has been closings of schools in remote rural areas. This evidently contributes to exacerbate depopulation in these areas. To stop this tendency, we need new models for high-quality, cost effective public services in rural areas as those as we find in Denmark. This chapter introduces such a model: Multifunctional centers. Such a model reflects a long tradition of local centralization in rural areas, that is, a golden compromise between ruralization and urbanization. First, I argue that governments should actively invest in rural areas rather than practicing laissez-faire. Second, I trace ideological roots in history pointing at 19th c. national civic movements and an early 20th c. transnational Garden City movement within urban planning as crucial. Drawing on contemporary case studies of multifunctional centers in Holland and Denmark, I then suggest that public and private donors should invest in multifunctional centers in which the local public school is the dynamo. This in order to increase local levels of social as well as human capital. Ideally, such centers should contain both public services such as school, library and health care, private enterprises as hairdressers and banks, and facilities for local associations as theatre scenes and sports halls. The centers should be designed to secure both economies of scale and geographic proximity. Empirical evidence indicates that such large meeting places in fact foster physical and social cohesion, as well as human capital and informal learning. Also that the stock of beneficial bridging social capital thus created actually contributes to attract newcomers and counteract depopulation.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelRural Education
RedaktørerChristine Frisiras
Udgivelses stedNew York
ForlagNova Science Publishers
Publikationsdato2009
SiderChapter 1
ISBN (Trykt)978-1-60692-966-7
StatusUdgivet - 2009

Fingeraftryk

rural area
Denmark
public service
human capital
social capital
school
private enterprise
informal learning
local public
social cohesion
centralization
urban planning
welfare state
theater
Finland
compromise
Norway
urbanization
Sweden
Sports

Emneord

  • Multifunktionelle centre
  • Danmark
  • Holland
  • Havebybevægelsen
  • Brobyggende social kapital
  • Socio-spatial planlægning

Citer dette

Svendsen, G. L. H. (2009). Multifunctional centers in rural areas: Fabrics of social and human capital. I C. Frisiras (red.), Rural Education (s. Chapter 1). New York: Nova Science Publishers.
Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase. / Multifunctional centers in rural areas : Fabrics of social and human capital. Rural Education. red. / Christine Frisiras. New York : Nova Science Publishers, 2009. s. Chapter 1
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Svendsen, GLH 2009, Multifunctional centers in rural areas: Fabrics of social and human capital. i C Frisiras (red.), Rural Education. Nova Science Publishers, New York, s. Chapter 1.

Multifunctional centers in rural areas : Fabrics of social and human capital. / Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase.

Rural Education. red. / Christine Frisiras. New York : Nova Science Publishers, 2009. s. Chapter 1.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskning

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T1 - Multifunctional centers in rural areas

T2 - Fabrics of social and human capital

AU - Svendsen, Gunnar Lind Haase

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N2 - In the Nordic welfare states (Island, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark), an important principle has hitherto been to allow all citizens access to the same high-quality public services - independent of whether they live in urban or rural areas. In Denmark, however, this principle is gradually being abandoned. One outcome has been closings of schools in remote rural areas. This evidently contributes to exacerbate depopulation in these areas. To stop this tendency, we need new models for high-quality, cost effective public services in rural areas as those as we find in Denmark. This chapter introduces such a model: Multifunctional centers. Such a model reflects a long tradition of local centralization in rural areas, that is, a golden compromise between ruralization and urbanization. First, I argue that governments should actively invest in rural areas rather than practicing laissez-faire. Second, I trace ideological roots in history pointing at 19th c. national civic movements and an early 20th c. transnational Garden City movement within urban planning as crucial. Drawing on contemporary case studies of multifunctional centers in Holland and Denmark, I then suggest that public and private donors should invest in multifunctional centers in which the local public school is the dynamo. This in order to increase local levels of social as well as human capital. Ideally, such centers should contain both public services such as school, library and health care, private enterprises as hairdressers and banks, and facilities for local associations as theatre scenes and sports halls. The centers should be designed to secure both economies of scale and geographic proximity. Empirical evidence indicates that such large meeting places in fact foster physical and social cohesion, as well as human capital and informal learning. Also that the stock of beneficial bridging social capital thus created actually contributes to attract newcomers and counteract depopulation.

AB - In the Nordic welfare states (Island, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark), an important principle has hitherto been to allow all citizens access to the same high-quality public services - independent of whether they live in urban or rural areas. In Denmark, however, this principle is gradually being abandoned. One outcome has been closings of schools in remote rural areas. This evidently contributes to exacerbate depopulation in these areas. To stop this tendency, we need new models for high-quality, cost effective public services in rural areas as those as we find in Denmark. This chapter introduces such a model: Multifunctional centers. Such a model reflects a long tradition of local centralization in rural areas, that is, a golden compromise between ruralization and urbanization. First, I argue that governments should actively invest in rural areas rather than practicing laissez-faire. Second, I trace ideological roots in history pointing at 19th c. national civic movements and an early 20th c. transnational Garden City movement within urban planning as crucial. Drawing on contemporary case studies of multifunctional centers in Holland and Denmark, I then suggest that public and private donors should invest in multifunctional centers in which the local public school is the dynamo. This in order to increase local levels of social as well as human capital. Ideally, such centers should contain both public services such as school, library and health care, private enterprises as hairdressers and banks, and facilities for local associations as theatre scenes and sports halls. The centers should be designed to secure both economies of scale and geographic proximity. Empirical evidence indicates that such large meeting places in fact foster physical and social cohesion, as well as human capital and informal learning. Also that the stock of beneficial bridging social capital thus created actually contributes to attract newcomers and counteract depopulation.

KW - Multifunktionelle centre

KW - Danmark

KW - Holland

KW - Havebybevægelsen

KW - Brobyggende social kapital

KW - Socio-spatial planlægning

KW - Multi-functional centres

KW - Denmark

KW - Holland

KW - Garden Cities Movement

KW - Bridging social capital

KW - Socio-Spatial Planning

M3 - Book chapter

SN - 978-1-60692-966-7

SP - Chapter 1

BT - Rural Education

A2 - Frisiras, Christine

PB - Nova Science Publishers

CY - New York

ER -

Svendsen GLH. Multifunctional centers in rural areas: Fabrics of social and human capital. I Frisiras C, red., Rural Education. New York: Nova Science Publishers. 2009. s. Chapter 1