Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns

Kyle H Srivastava, Caroline M Holmes, Michiel Vellema, Andrea R Pack, Coen P H Elemans, Ilya Nemenman, Samuel J Sober

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Resumé

A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how sequences of action potentials ("spikes") encode information about sensory signals and motor outputs. Although traditional theories assume that this information is conveyed by the total number of spikes fired within a specified time interval (spike rate), recent studies have shown that additional information is carried by the millisecond-scale timing patterns of action potentials (spike timing). However, it is unknown whether or how subtle differences in spike timing drive differences in perception or behavior, leaving it unclear whether the information in spike timing actually plays a role in brain function. By examining the activity of individual motor units (the muscle fibers innervated by a single motor neuron) and manipulating patterns of activation of these neurons, we provide both correlative and causal evidence that the nervous system uses millisecond-scale variations in the timing of spikes within multispike patterns to control a vertebrate behavior-namely, respiration in the Bengalese finch, a songbird. These findings suggest that a fundamental assumption of current theories of motor coding requires revision.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftProceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America
Vol/bind114
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1171-1176
ISSN0027-8424
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Action Potentials
Information Theory
Motor Neurons
Nervous System
Vertebrates
Respiration
Motor Activity
Neurons
Muscles

Citer dette

Srivastava, Kyle H ; Holmes, Caroline M ; Vellema, Michiel ; Pack, Andrea R ; Elemans, Coen P H ; Nemenman, Ilya ; Sober, Samuel J. / Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns. I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America. 2017 ; Bind 114, Nr. 5. s. 1171-1176.
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Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns. / Srivastava, Kyle H; Holmes, Caroline M; Vellema, Michiel; Pack, Andrea R; Elemans, Coen P H; Nemenman, Ilya; Sober, Samuel J.

I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America, Bind 114, Nr. 5, 2017, s. 1171-1176.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns

AU - Srivastava, Kyle H

AU - Holmes, Caroline M

AU - Vellema, Michiel

AU - Pack, Andrea R

AU - Elemans, Coen P H

AU - Nemenman, Ilya

AU - Sober, Samuel J

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AB - A fundamental problem in neuroscience is understanding how sequences of action potentials ("spikes") encode information about sensory signals and motor outputs. Although traditional theories assume that this information is conveyed by the total number of spikes fired within a specified time interval (spike rate), recent studies have shown that additional information is carried by the millisecond-scale timing patterns of action potentials (spike timing). However, it is unknown whether or how subtle differences in spike timing drive differences in perception or behavior, leaving it unclear whether the information in spike timing actually plays a role in brain function. By examining the activity of individual motor units (the muscle fibers innervated by a single motor neuron) and manipulating patterns of activation of these neurons, we provide both correlative and causal evidence that the nervous system uses millisecond-scale variations in the timing of spikes within multispike patterns to control a vertebrate behavior-namely, respiration in the Bengalese finch, a songbird. These findings suggest that a fundamental assumption of current theories of motor coding requires revision.

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