Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100

Jette Mortensen, Tina Svenstrup Poulsen, Erik Lerkevang Grove, Jens Refsgaard, Helle Ladefoged Nielsen, Susanne Bendesgaard Pedersen, Sofie Sommer Thygesen, Anne-Mette Hvas, Steen Dalby Kristensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2008-null
OriginalsprogEngelsk
BogserieScandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement
Vol/bind68
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)786-92
Antal sider6
ISSN0085-591X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. jan. 2008

Fingeraftryk

Compliance
Coronary Artery Disease
Serum
Incidence

Citer dette

Mortensen, J., Poulsen, T. S., Grove, E. L., Refsgaard, J., Nielsen, H. L., Pedersen, S. B., ... Kristensen, S. D. (2008). Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100. Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement, 68(8), 786-92. https://doi.org/10.1080/00365510802262680
Mortensen, Jette ; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup ; Grove, Erik Lerkevang ; Refsgaard, Jens ; Nielsen, Helle Ladefoged ; Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard ; Thygesen, Sofie Sommer ; Hvas, Anne-Mette ; Kristensen, Steen Dalby. / Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100. I: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement. 2008 ; Bind 68, Nr. 8. s. 786-92.
@article{c575b820eb8f11dd990d000ea68e967b,
title = "Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Low platelet response to aspirin has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of vascular events. The reported prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness varies, which may be explained by poor reproducibility of the methods used to evaluate aspirin response and low compliance. The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before aspirin treatment in healthy subjects. Serum-thromboxane B(2) (S-TxB(2)) was measured to assess compliance. RESULTS: In healthy volunteers not receiving aspirin, duplicate measurements resulted in coefficients of variation (CV) of 7.9 {\%} for the PFA-100 and 5.2 {\%} for OPA. During aspirin treatment, CVs were significantly higher (healthy volunteers: PFA-100: 15.6 {\%}, OPA: 19.2 {\%}; patients: PFA-100: 26.6 {\%}, OPA: 16.8 {\%}). Two of the 64 participants were classified as aspirin low-responders with both methods, indicating poor agreement (Kappa coefficient 0.05). Compliance was excellent, as S-TxB(2) was completely inhibited in all participants. CONCLUSIONS: Aspirin treatment affects the reproducibility of both PFA-100 and OPA. This imprecision should be considered carefully if the methods are used for monitoring aspirin treatment. Additionally, these methods do not identify the same individuals as being aspirin low-responders.",
keywords = "Adult, Arachidonic Acid, Aspirin, Coronary Artery Disease, Female, Health, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Physiologic, Platelet Aggregation, Platelet Function Tests",
author = "Jette Mortensen and Poulsen, {Tina Svenstrup} and Grove, {Erik Lerkevang} and Jens Refsgaard and Nielsen, {Helle Ladefoged} and Pedersen, {Susanne Bendesgaard} and Thygesen, {Sofie Sommer} and Anne-Mette Hvas and Kristensen, {Steen Dalby}",
year = "2008",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00365510802262680",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "786--92",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement",
issn = "0085-591X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "8",

}

Mortensen, J, Poulsen, TS, Grove, EL, Refsgaard, J, Nielsen, HL, Pedersen, SB, Thygesen, SS, Hvas, A-M & Kristensen, SD 2008, 'Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100', Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement, bind 68, nr. 8, s. 786-92. https://doi.org/10.1080/00365510802262680

Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100. / Mortensen, Jette; Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Refsgaard, Jens; Nielsen, Helle Ladefoged; Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard; Thygesen, Sofie Sommer; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby.

I: Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement, Bind 68, Nr. 8, 01.01.2008, s. 786-92.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Monitoring aspirin therapy with the Platelet Function Analyzer-100

AU - Mortensen, Jette

AU - Poulsen, Tina Svenstrup

AU - Grove, Erik Lerkevang

AU - Refsgaard, Jens

AU - Nielsen, Helle Ladefoged

AU - Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard

AU - Thygesen, Sofie Sommer

AU - Hvas, Anne-Mette

AU - Kristensen, Steen Dalby

PY - 2008/1/1

Y1 - 2008/1/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Low platelet response to aspirin has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of vascular events. The reported prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness varies, which may be explained by poor reproducibility of the methods used to evaluate aspirin response and low compliance. The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before aspirin treatment in healthy subjects. Serum-thromboxane B(2) (S-TxB(2)) was measured to assess compliance. RESULTS: In healthy volunteers not receiving aspirin, duplicate measurements resulted in coefficients of variation (CV) of 7.9 % for the PFA-100 and 5.2 % for OPA. During aspirin treatment, CVs were significantly higher (healthy volunteers: PFA-100: 15.6 %, OPA: 19.2 %; patients: PFA-100: 26.6 %, OPA: 16.8 %). Two of the 64 participants were classified as aspirin low-responders with both methods, indicating poor agreement (Kappa coefficient 0.05). Compliance was excellent, as S-TxB(2) was completely inhibited in all participants. CONCLUSIONS: Aspirin treatment affects the reproducibility of both PFA-100 and OPA. This imprecision should be considered carefully if the methods are used for monitoring aspirin treatment. Additionally, these methods do not identify the same individuals as being aspirin low-responders.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Low platelet response to aspirin has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of vascular events. The reported prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness varies, which may be explained by poor reproducibility of the methods used to evaluate aspirin response and low compliance. The Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PFA-100) is a commonly used platelet function test. We aimed to assess the reproducibility of the PFA-100 and the agreement with optical platelet aggregometry (OPA) in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) treated with low-dose aspirin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty-one healthy volunteers and 43 patients with CAD took part in the study. During treatment with aspirin 75 mg daily, all participants had platelet function assessed in duplicate with the PFA-100 and OPA on 4 consecutive days. Additionally, platelet function was assessed before aspirin treatment in healthy subjects. Serum-thromboxane B(2) (S-TxB(2)) was measured to assess compliance. RESULTS: In healthy volunteers not receiving aspirin, duplicate measurements resulted in coefficients of variation (CV) of 7.9 % for the PFA-100 and 5.2 % for OPA. During aspirin treatment, CVs were significantly higher (healthy volunteers: PFA-100: 15.6 %, OPA: 19.2 %; patients: PFA-100: 26.6 %, OPA: 16.8 %). Two of the 64 participants were classified as aspirin low-responders with both methods, indicating poor agreement (Kappa coefficient 0.05). Compliance was excellent, as S-TxB(2) was completely inhibited in all participants. CONCLUSIONS: Aspirin treatment affects the reproducibility of both PFA-100 and OPA. This imprecision should be considered carefully if the methods are used for monitoring aspirin treatment. Additionally, these methods do not identify the same individuals as being aspirin low-responders.

KW - Adult

KW - Arachidonic Acid

KW - Aspirin

KW - Coronary Artery Disease

KW - Female

KW - Health

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Monitoring, Physiologic

KW - Platelet Aggregation

KW - Platelet Function Tests

U2 - 10.1080/00365510802262680

DO - 10.1080/00365510802262680

M3 - Journal article

VL - 68

SP - 786

EP - 792

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation. Supplement

SN - 0085-591X

IS - 8

ER -