Methods to collect and interpret external training load using microtechnology incorporating GPS in professional football: a systematic review

Vincenzo Rago*, João Brito, Pedro Figueiredo, Júlio Costa, Daniel Barreira, Peter Krustrup, António Rebelo

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

Resumé

The aim of this article was to systematically review the methods adopted to collect and interpret external training load (ETL) using microtechnology incorporating global positioning system (GPS). The main deficiencies identified concerned the non-collection of match ETL, and the non-consideration of potential confounders (e.g. playing position, fitness level, starting status or session content). Also, complementary training (individual/reconditioning) and pre-match warm-up were rarely quantified. To provide a full picture of the training demands, ETL was commonly complemented by internal training load monitoring with the rating of perceived exertion predominantly adopted instead of heart rate recordings. Continuous data collection and interpretation of ETL data in professional football vary widely between observational studies, possibly reflecting the actual procedures adopted in practical settings. Evidence about continuous ETL monitoring in female players, and female as well as male goalkeepers is lacking.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftResearch in Sports Medicine
ISSN1543-8627
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 22. nov. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Geographic Information Systems
Football

Citer dette

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Methods to collect and interpret external training load using microtechnology incorporating GPS in professional football : a systematic review. / Rago, Vincenzo; Brito, João; Figueiredo, Pedro; Costa, Júlio; Barreira, Daniel; Krustrup, Peter; Rebelo, António.

I: Research in Sports Medicine, 22.11.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

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T2 - a systematic review

AU - Rago, Vincenzo

AU - Brito, João

AU - Figueiredo, Pedro

AU - Costa, Júlio

AU - Barreira, Daniel

AU - Krustrup, Peter

AU - Rebelo, António

PY - 2019/11/22

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AB - The aim of this article was to systematically review the methods adopted to collect and interpret external training load (ETL) using microtechnology incorporating global positioning system (GPS). The main deficiencies identified concerned the non-collection of match ETL, and the non-consideration of potential confounders (e.g. playing position, fitness level, starting status or session content). Also, complementary training (individual/reconditioning) and pre-match warm-up were rarely quantified. To provide a full picture of the training demands, ETL was commonly complemented by internal training load monitoring with the rating of perceived exertion predominantly adopted instead of heart rate recordings. Continuous data collection and interpretation of ETL data in professional football vary widely between observational studies, possibly reflecting the actual procedures adopted in practical settings. Evidence about continuous ETL monitoring in female players, and female as well as male goalkeepers is lacking.

KW - fitness

KW - injury prevention

KW - monitoring

KW - performance

KW - soccer

KW - Team sports

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DO - 10.1080/15438627.2019.1686703

M3 - Review

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JO - Research in Sports Medicine

JF - Research in Sports Medicine

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