Metaphor as Art

A Thought Experiment

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskning

Resumé

Research on metaphor has primarily foregrounded the problematic sides of metaphors. Metaphors shape experience, they can foreclose options, they suggest norms and cultural values and, in doing so, they may even be lethal, as physician-writer Abraham Verghese argues in relation to HIV/AIDS metaphors. The chapter identifies some of the properties of art that might be productively transferred to metaphors and, by illustrating the features with specific examples, and shows how the thought experiment might illuminate properties of metaphors that are potentially useful in medical/health humanities. In medical education, it is often the reverse movement—namely the familiarising quality of metaphor—that is used for pedagogical or mnemonic purposes. John Dubie’s cancer metaphor and the student’s cookie comparison are invitations to explore an object or experience with imagination and creativity. Physicians use similar techniques when they invent new metaphors to explain unfamiliar terms, difficult diagnoses and diseases to their patients. Metaphors, like artworks, are, without a doubt, far from being innocent pleasures.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelRoutledge Handbook of the Medical Humanities
RedaktørerAlan Bleakley
ForlagRoutledge
Publikationsdato2020
Sider136-143
Kapitel12
ISBN (Elektronisk)9781351241779
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2020

Fingeraftryk

Thought Experiments
Art
Physicians
Cancer
AIDS/HIV
New Metaphor
Medical Education
Writer
Artwork
Creativity
Health
Mnemonics
Cultural Values
Pleasure

Citer dette

Wohlmann, A. (2020). Metaphor as Art: A Thought Experiment. I A. Bleakley (red.), Routledge Handbook of the Medical Humanities (s. 136-143). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351241779-13
Wohlmann, Anita. / Metaphor as Art : A Thought Experiment. Routledge Handbook of the Medical Humanities. red. / Alan Bleakley. Routledge, 2020. s. 136-143
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Wohlmann, A 2020, Metaphor as Art: A Thought Experiment. i A Bleakley (red.), Routledge Handbook of the Medical Humanities. Routledge, s. 136-143. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351241779-13

Metaphor as Art : A Thought Experiment. / Wohlmann, Anita.

Routledge Handbook of the Medical Humanities. red. / Alan Bleakley. Routledge, 2020. s. 136-143.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskning

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Wohlmann A. Metaphor as Art: A Thought Experiment. I Bleakley A, red., Routledge Handbook of the Medical Humanities. Routledge. 2020. s. 136-143 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781351241779-13