Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors

Lotte Dyhrberg O'Neill, Jan Hartvigsen, Birgitta Wallstedt, Lars Korsholm, Berit Eika

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Resumé

Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half took a composite non-grade-based admission test (Strategy 2). Educational as well as social predictor variables (doctor-parent, origin, parenthood, parents living together, parent on benefit, university-educated parents) were also examined. The outcome of interest was students' dropout status at 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Results  Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission strategy, the type of qualifying examination and the priority given to the programme on the national application forms contributed significantly to the dropout model. Social variables did not predict dropout and neither did Strategy 2 admission test scores. Conclusions  Selection by admission testing appeared to have an independent, protective effect on dropout in this setting.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMedical Education
Vol/bind45
Udgave nummer11
Sider (fra-til)1111-1120
ISSN0308-0110
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. nov. 2011

Fingeraftryk

drop-out
school
parents
student
parenthood
Denmark
medical student
regression analysis
confidence
logistics
examination
university
education

Citer dette

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title = "Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors",
abstract = "Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half took a composite non-grade-based admission test (Strategy 2). Educational as well as social predictor variables (doctor-parent, origin, parenthood, parents living together, parent on benefit, university-educated parents) were also examined. The outcome of interest was students' dropout status at 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Results  Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95{\%} confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission strategy, the type of qualifying examination and the priority given to the programme on the national application forms contributed significantly to the dropout model. Social variables did not predict dropout and neither did Strategy 2 admission test scores. Conclusions  Selection by admission testing appeared to have an independent, protective effect on dropout in this setting.",
author = "O'Neill, {Lotte Dyhrberg} and Jan Hartvigsen and Birgitta Wallstedt and Lars Korsholm and Berit Eika",
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Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors. / O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wallstedt, Birgitta; Korsholm, Lars; Eika, Berit.

I: Medical Education, Bind 45, Nr. 11, 01.11.2011, s. 1111-1120.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medical school dropout - testing at admission versus selection by highest grades as predictors

AU - O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg

AU - Hartvigsen, Jan

AU - Wallstedt, Birgitta

AU - Korsholm, Lars

AU - Eika, Berit

N1 - Article first published online: 12 OCT 2011

PY - 2011/11/1

Y1 - 2011/11/1

N2 - Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half took a composite non-grade-based admission test (Strategy 2). Educational as well as social predictor variables (doctor-parent, origin, parenthood, parents living together, parent on benefit, university-educated parents) were also examined. The outcome of interest was students' dropout status at 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Results  Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission strategy, the type of qualifying examination and the priority given to the programme on the national application forms contributed significantly to the dropout model. Social variables did not predict dropout and neither did Strategy 2 admission test scores. Conclusions  Selection by admission testing appeared to have an independent, protective effect on dropout in this setting.

AB - Medical Education 2011: 45: 1111-1120 Context  Very few studies have reported on the effect of admission tests on medical school dropout. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of non-grade-based admission testing versus grade-based admission relative to subsequent dropout. Methods  This prospective cohort study followed six cohorts of medical students admitted to the medical school at the University of Southern Denmark during 2002-2007 (n = 1544). Half of the students were admitted based on their prior achievement of highest grades (Strategy 1) and the other half took a composite non-grade-based admission test (Strategy 2). Educational as well as social predictor variables (doctor-parent, origin, parenthood, parents living together, parent on benefit, university-educated parents) were also examined. The outcome of interest was students' dropout status at 2 years after admission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model dropout. Results  Strategy 2 (admission test) students had a lower relative risk for dropping out of medical school within 2 years of admission (odds ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.39-0.80). Only the admission strategy, the type of qualifying examination and the priority given to the programme on the national application forms contributed significantly to the dropout model. Social variables did not predict dropout and neither did Strategy 2 admission test scores. Conclusions  Selection by admission testing appeared to have an independent, protective effect on dropout in this setting.

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DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2923.2011.04057.x

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JF - Medical Education

SN - 0308-0110

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