Meat and fiber intake and interaction with pattern recognition receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR10) in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective, case-cohort study

Tine Iskov Kopp, Ulla Vogel, Anne Tjonneland, Vibeke Andersen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background: Meat and dietary fiber are associated with increased and decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) regulate the intestinal immune response in a complex interplay between the mucosal epithelium and the microbiota and may therefore be important modulators of diet-induced CRC together with other inflammatory mediators.

Objective: Our aim was to investigate the association between functional TLR polymorphisms and risk of CRC and the interaction with dietary factors. Additionally, interactions with previously studied polymorphisms in IL10, IL1B, PTGS2, and NFKB1 were assessed in order to examine possible biological pathways in meat-induced CRC.

Design: A nested case-cohort study of 897 CRC cases and 1689 randomly selected participants from the Danish prospective "Diet, Cancer and Health" study encompassing 57,053 persons was performed using Cox proportional hazard models and the likelihood ratio test.

Results: We found associations between polymorphisms in TLR2 (P = 0.018) and TLR4 (P = 0.044) and risk of CRC per se, interactions between intake of red and processed meat (10 g/d) and polymorphisms in TLR1 (P-interaction = 0.032) and TLR10 (P-interaction = 0.026 and 0.036), and intake of cereals (50 g/d) and TLR4 (P-interaction = 0.044) in relation to risk of CRC. Intake of red and processed meat also interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR1 and TLR10 and polymorphisms in NFKB1, IL10, IL1B, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR1/rs4833095 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.021, TLR10/rs11096955 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.047, TLR10/rs11096955 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.017, TLR10/rs4129009 × NFKB1/rs28362491 = 0.027, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs4848306 = 0.020, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs1143623 = 0.021, TLR10/rs4129009 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.027), whereas intake of dietary fiber (10 g/d) interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR4, IL10, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR4/rs1554973 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.0012, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.0041, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs5275 = 0.0064).

Conclusions: Our study suggests that meat intake may activate TLRs at the epithelial surface, leading to CRC via inflammation by nuclear transcription factor-κB-initiated transcription of inflammatory genes, whereas intake of fiber may protect against CRC via TLR4-mediated secretion of interleukin-10 and cyclooxygenase-2. Our results should be replicated in other prospective cohorts with well-characterized participants. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03250637.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Vol/bind107
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)465-479
ISSN0002-9165
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

Fingeraftryk

Meat
Colorectal Neoplasms
Cohort Studies
Interleukin-10
Dietary Fiber
Diet
Microbiota
Proportional Hazards Models
Epithelium
Health

Citer dette

@article{b7f0db7c21cf4c0e8aeec1aead9285b2,
title = "Meat and fiber intake and interaction with pattern recognition receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR10) in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective, case-cohort study",
abstract = "Background: Meat and dietary fiber are associated with increased and decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) regulate the intestinal immune response in a complex interplay between the mucosal epithelium and the microbiota and may therefore be important modulators of diet-induced CRC together with other inflammatory mediators.Objective: Our aim was to investigate the association between functional TLR polymorphisms and risk of CRC and the interaction with dietary factors. Additionally, interactions with previously studied polymorphisms in IL10, IL1B, PTGS2, and NFKB1 were assessed in order to examine possible biological pathways in meat-induced CRC.Design: A nested case-cohort study of 897 CRC cases and 1689 randomly selected participants from the Danish prospective {"}Diet, Cancer and Health{"} study encompassing 57,053 persons was performed using Cox proportional hazard models and the likelihood ratio test.Results: We found associations between polymorphisms in TLR2 (P = 0.018) and TLR4 (P = 0.044) and risk of CRC per se, interactions between intake of red and processed meat (10 g/d) and polymorphisms in TLR1 (P-interaction = 0.032) and TLR10 (P-interaction = 0.026 and 0.036), and intake of cereals (50 g/d) and TLR4 (P-interaction = 0.044) in relation to risk of CRC. Intake of red and processed meat also interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR1 and TLR10 and polymorphisms in NFKB1, IL10, IL1B, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR1/rs4833095 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.021, TLR10/rs11096955 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.047, TLR10/rs11096955 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.017, TLR10/rs4129009 × NFKB1/rs28362491 = 0.027, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs4848306 = 0.020, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs1143623 = 0.021, TLR10/rs4129009 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.027), whereas intake of dietary fiber (10 g/d) interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR4, IL10, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR4/rs1554973 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.0012, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.0041, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs5275 = 0.0064).Conclusions: Our study suggests that meat intake may activate TLRs at the epithelial surface, leading to CRC via inflammation by nuclear transcription factor-κB-initiated transcription of inflammatory genes, whereas intake of fiber may protect against CRC via TLR4-mediated secretion of interleukin-10 and cyclooxygenase-2. Our results should be replicated in other prospective cohorts with well-characterized participants. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03250637.",
keywords = "Toll-like receptors, Western-style diet, candidate gene, colorectal cancer, gene-environment interaction",
author = "Kopp, {Tine Iskov} and Ulla Vogel and Anne Tjonneland and Vibeke Andersen",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1093/ajcn/nqx011",
language = "English",
volume = "107",
pages = "465--479",
journal = "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "AMER SOC NUTRITION-ASN",
number = "3",

}

Meat and fiber intake and interaction with pattern recognition receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR10) in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective, case-cohort study. / Kopp, Tine Iskov; Vogel, Ulla; Tjonneland, Anne; Andersen, Vibeke.

I: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Bind 107, Nr. 3, 2018, s. 465-479.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Meat and fiber intake and interaction with pattern recognition receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR10) in relation to colorectal cancer in a Danish prospective, case-cohort study

AU - Kopp, Tine Iskov

AU - Vogel, Ulla

AU - Tjonneland, Anne

AU - Andersen, Vibeke

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Background: Meat and dietary fiber are associated with increased and decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) regulate the intestinal immune response in a complex interplay between the mucosal epithelium and the microbiota and may therefore be important modulators of diet-induced CRC together with other inflammatory mediators.Objective: Our aim was to investigate the association between functional TLR polymorphisms and risk of CRC and the interaction with dietary factors. Additionally, interactions with previously studied polymorphisms in IL10, IL1B, PTGS2, and NFKB1 were assessed in order to examine possible biological pathways in meat-induced CRC.Design: A nested case-cohort study of 897 CRC cases and 1689 randomly selected participants from the Danish prospective "Diet, Cancer and Health" study encompassing 57,053 persons was performed using Cox proportional hazard models and the likelihood ratio test.Results: We found associations between polymorphisms in TLR2 (P = 0.018) and TLR4 (P = 0.044) and risk of CRC per se, interactions between intake of red and processed meat (10 g/d) and polymorphisms in TLR1 (P-interaction = 0.032) and TLR10 (P-interaction = 0.026 and 0.036), and intake of cereals (50 g/d) and TLR4 (P-interaction = 0.044) in relation to risk of CRC. Intake of red and processed meat also interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR1 and TLR10 and polymorphisms in NFKB1, IL10, IL1B, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR1/rs4833095 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.021, TLR10/rs11096955 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.047, TLR10/rs11096955 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.017, TLR10/rs4129009 × NFKB1/rs28362491 = 0.027, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs4848306 = 0.020, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs1143623 = 0.021, TLR10/rs4129009 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.027), whereas intake of dietary fiber (10 g/d) interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR4, IL10, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR4/rs1554973 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.0012, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.0041, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs5275 = 0.0064).Conclusions: Our study suggests that meat intake may activate TLRs at the epithelial surface, leading to CRC via inflammation by nuclear transcription factor-κB-initiated transcription of inflammatory genes, whereas intake of fiber may protect against CRC via TLR4-mediated secretion of interleukin-10 and cyclooxygenase-2. Our results should be replicated in other prospective cohorts with well-characterized participants. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03250637.

AB - Background: Meat and dietary fiber are associated with increased and decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) regulate the intestinal immune response in a complex interplay between the mucosal epithelium and the microbiota and may therefore be important modulators of diet-induced CRC together with other inflammatory mediators.Objective: Our aim was to investigate the association between functional TLR polymorphisms and risk of CRC and the interaction with dietary factors. Additionally, interactions with previously studied polymorphisms in IL10, IL1B, PTGS2, and NFKB1 were assessed in order to examine possible biological pathways in meat-induced CRC.Design: A nested case-cohort study of 897 CRC cases and 1689 randomly selected participants from the Danish prospective "Diet, Cancer and Health" study encompassing 57,053 persons was performed using Cox proportional hazard models and the likelihood ratio test.Results: We found associations between polymorphisms in TLR2 (P = 0.018) and TLR4 (P = 0.044) and risk of CRC per se, interactions between intake of red and processed meat (10 g/d) and polymorphisms in TLR1 (P-interaction = 0.032) and TLR10 (P-interaction = 0.026 and 0.036), and intake of cereals (50 g/d) and TLR4 (P-interaction = 0.044) in relation to risk of CRC. Intake of red and processed meat also interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR1 and TLR10 and polymorphisms in NFKB1, IL10, IL1B, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR1/rs4833095 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.021, TLR10/rs11096955 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.047, TLR10/rs11096955 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.017, TLR10/rs4129009 × NFKB1/rs28362491 = 0.027, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs4848306 = 0.020, TLR10/rs4129009 × IL1B/rs1143623 = 0.021, TLR10/rs4129009 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.027), whereas intake of dietary fiber (10 g/d) interacted with combinations of polymorphisms in TLR4, IL10, and PTGS2 (P-interaction; TLR4/rs1554973 × IL10/rs3024505 = 0.0012, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs20417 = 0.0041, TLR4/rs1554973 × PTGS2/rs5275 = 0.0064).Conclusions: Our study suggests that meat intake may activate TLRs at the epithelial surface, leading to CRC via inflammation by nuclear transcription factor-κB-initiated transcription of inflammatory genes, whereas intake of fiber may protect against CRC via TLR4-mediated secretion of interleukin-10 and cyclooxygenase-2. Our results should be replicated in other prospective cohorts with well-characterized participants. The trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03250637.

KW - Toll-like receptors

KW - Western-style diet

KW - candidate gene

KW - colorectal cancer

KW - gene-environment interaction

U2 - 10.1093/ajcn/nqx011

DO - 10.1093/ajcn/nqx011

M3 - Journal article

VL - 107

SP - 465

EP - 479

JO - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 3

ER -