Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

Resumé

Background and purpose:
It is likely that the most common method for calculating a Roland Morris Disability Index (RMDQ) sum score is to simply ignore any unanswered questions. In contrast, the raw sum score on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is converted to a 0-100 scale, with the advantage of allowing missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation. The aim of this study was to quantify the calculation error in RMDQ scores when one or more questions were unanswered and compare this with the error present when the ODI was scored in the same way.

Methods and results:
The prevalence of unanswered RMDQ questions was measured in a research and a routine care setting. The accuracy of the RMDQ proportional recalculation method was measured using 311 fully completed RMDQ and matching ODI questionnaire sets. Raw sum scores were calculated, and questions systematically dropped. At each stage, sum scores were converted to a score on a 0-100 scale and the error calculated. Wilcoxon Tests were used to compare the magnitude of the error scores.

The prevalence of unanswered questions was 29.5% (RMDQ) in routine care, and 13.9% (ODI) and 20.3% (RMDQ) in a research project. Proportional recalculation was a more accurate method to calculate RMDQ sum scores than simply ignoring missing data.

Conclusions:
The practice of expressing RMDQ scores as a standardized score allows missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation and is as valid for the RMDQ as it is for the ODI.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2010
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 2010
BegivenhedThe British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference? - Odense, Danmark
Varighed: 9. jun. 201011. jun. 2010

Konference

KonferenceThe British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?
LandDanmark
ByOdense
Periode09/06/201011/06/2010

Fingeraftryk

Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Emneord

  • Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire
  • Oswestry Disability Index
  • Manglende besvarelser
  • Prævalens
  • Score system

Citer dette

Lauridsen, H. H. (2010). Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Poster session præsenteret på The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.
Lauridsen, Henrik Hein. / Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Poster session præsenteret på The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.1 s.
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abstract = "Background and purpose:It is likely that the most common method for calculating a Roland Morris Disability Index (RMDQ) sum score is to simply ignore any unanswered questions. In contrast, the raw sum score on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is converted to a 0-100 scale, with the advantage of allowing missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation. The aim of this study was to quantify the calculation error in RMDQ scores when one or more questions were unanswered and compare this with the error present when the ODI was scored in the same way.Methods and results: The prevalence of unanswered RMDQ questions was measured in a research and a routine care setting. The accuracy of the RMDQ proportional recalculation method was measured using 311 fully completed RMDQ and matching ODI questionnaire sets. Raw sum scores were calculated, and questions systematically dropped. At each stage, sum scores were converted to a score on a 0-100 scale and the error calculated. Wilcoxon Tests were used to compare the magnitude of the error scores.The prevalence of unanswered questions was 29.5{\%} (RMDQ) in routine care, and 13.9{\%} (ODI) and 20.3{\%} (RMDQ) in a research project. Proportional recalculation was a more accurate method to calculate RMDQ sum scores than simply ignoring missing data.Conclusions:The practice of expressing RMDQ scores as a standardized score allows missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation and is as valid for the RMDQ as it is for the ODI.",
keywords = "Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, Manglende besvarelser, Pr{\ae}valens, Score system, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, Missing scores, Prevalence, Scoring system",
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Lauridsen, HH 2010, 'Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire' The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark, 09/06/2010 - 11/06/2010, .

Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. / Lauridsen, Henrik Hein.

2010. Poster session præsenteret på The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPosterForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire

AU - Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Background and purpose:It is likely that the most common method for calculating a Roland Morris Disability Index (RMDQ) sum score is to simply ignore any unanswered questions. In contrast, the raw sum score on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is converted to a 0-100 scale, with the advantage of allowing missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation. The aim of this study was to quantify the calculation error in RMDQ scores when one or more questions were unanswered and compare this with the error present when the ODI was scored in the same way.Methods and results: The prevalence of unanswered RMDQ questions was measured in a research and a routine care setting. The accuracy of the RMDQ proportional recalculation method was measured using 311 fully completed RMDQ and matching ODI questionnaire sets. Raw sum scores were calculated, and questions systematically dropped. At each stage, sum scores were converted to a score on a 0-100 scale and the error calculated. Wilcoxon Tests were used to compare the magnitude of the error scores.The prevalence of unanswered questions was 29.5% (RMDQ) in routine care, and 13.9% (ODI) and 20.3% (RMDQ) in a research project. Proportional recalculation was a more accurate method to calculate RMDQ sum scores than simply ignoring missing data.Conclusions:The practice of expressing RMDQ scores as a standardized score allows missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation and is as valid for the RMDQ as it is for the ODI.

AB - Background and purpose:It is likely that the most common method for calculating a Roland Morris Disability Index (RMDQ) sum score is to simply ignore any unanswered questions. In contrast, the raw sum score on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) is converted to a 0-100 scale, with the advantage of allowing missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation. The aim of this study was to quantify the calculation error in RMDQ scores when one or more questions were unanswered and compare this with the error present when the ODI was scored in the same way.Methods and results: The prevalence of unanswered RMDQ questions was measured in a research and a routine care setting. The accuracy of the RMDQ proportional recalculation method was measured using 311 fully completed RMDQ and matching ODI questionnaire sets. Raw sum scores were calculated, and questions systematically dropped. At each stage, sum scores were converted to a score on a 0-100 scale and the error calculated. Wilcoxon Tests were used to compare the magnitude of the error scores.The prevalence of unanswered questions was 29.5% (RMDQ) in routine care, and 13.9% (ODI) and 20.3% (RMDQ) in a research project. Proportional recalculation was a more accurate method to calculate RMDQ sum scores than simply ignoring missing data.Conclusions:The practice of expressing RMDQ scores as a standardized score allows missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation and is as valid for the RMDQ as it is for the ODI.

KW - Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire

KW - Oswestry Disability Index

KW - Manglende besvarelser

KW - Prævalens

KW - Score system

KW - Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire

KW - Oswestry Disability Index

KW - Missing scores

KW - Prevalence

KW - Scoring system

M3 - Poster

ER -

Lauridsen HH. Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. 2010. Poster session præsenteret på The British Society for Back Pain Research - Annual General Meeting: The life course of back pain - are we making a difference?, Odense, Danmark.