Major Depressive Symptoms Increase 3-Year Mortality Rate in Patients with Mild Dementia

Jindong Ding Petersen, Frans Boch Waldorff, Volkert Dirk Siersma, Thien Kieu Thi Phung, Anna Carina Klara Magdalena Bebe, Gunhild Waldemar

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Resumé

Depression and dementia are commonly concurrent and are both associated with increased mortality among older people. However, little is known about whether home-dwelling patients newly diagnosed with mild dementia coexisting with depressive symptoms have excess mortality. We conducted a post hoc analysis based on data from the Danish Alzheimer's Intervention Study of 330 individuals who were diagnosed with mild dementia within the past 12 months. Thirty-four patients were identified with major depressive symptoms (MD-S) at baseline. During the 3-year follow-up period, 56 patients died, and, among them, 12 were with MD-S at baseline. Multivariable analysis adjusting for the potential confounders (age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education, BMI, household status, MMSE, CCI, QoL-AD, NPIQ, ADSC-ADL, medication, and RCT allocation) showed that patients with MD-S had a 2.5-fold higher mortality as compared to the patients without or with only few depressive symptoms. Our result revealed that depression is possibly associated with increased mortality in patients with mild dementia. Given that depression is treatable, screening for depression and treatment of depression can be important already in the earliest stage of dementia to reduce mortality.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer7482094
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Vol/bind2017
Antal sider8
ISSN2090-8024
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Depression
Alcohol Drinking
Smoking
Education

Citer dette

Petersen, Jindong Ding ; Waldorff, Frans Boch ; Siersma, Volkert Dirk ; Phung, Thien Kieu Thi ; Bebe, Anna Carina Klara Magdalena ; Waldemar, Gunhild. / Major Depressive Symptoms Increase 3-Year Mortality Rate in Patients with Mild Dementia. I: International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2017 ; Bind 2017.
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Major Depressive Symptoms Increase 3-Year Mortality Rate in Patients with Mild Dementia. / Petersen, Jindong Ding; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Phung, Thien Kieu Thi; Bebe, Anna Carina Klara Magdalena; Waldemar, Gunhild.

I: International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Bind 2017, 7482094, 2017.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Bebe, Anna Carina Klara Magdalena

AU - Waldemar, Gunhild

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N2 - Depression and dementia are commonly concurrent and are both associated with increased mortality among older people. However, little is known about whether home-dwelling patients newly diagnosed with mild dementia coexisting with depressive symptoms have excess mortality. We conducted a post hoc analysis based on data from the Danish Alzheimer's Intervention Study of 330 individuals who were diagnosed with mild dementia within the past 12 months. Thirty-four patients were identified with major depressive symptoms (MD-S) at baseline. During the 3-year follow-up period, 56 patients died, and, among them, 12 were with MD-S at baseline. Multivariable analysis adjusting for the potential confounders (age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, education, BMI, household status, MMSE, CCI, QoL-AD, NPIQ, ADSC-ADL, medication, and RCT allocation) showed that patients with MD-S had a 2.5-fold higher mortality as compared to the patients without or with only few depressive symptoms. Our result revealed that depression is possibly associated with increased mortality in patients with mild dementia. Given that depression is treatable, screening for depression and treatment of depression can be important already in the earliest stage of dementia to reduce mortality.

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