Maintaining turbidity and current flow in laboratory aquarium studies, a case study using Sabellaria spinulosa

Andrew J. Davies, Kim S. Last, Karl Attard, Vicki J. Hendrick

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Many aquatic organisms rely on the suspension of particulate matter for food or for building materials, yet these conditions are difficult to replicate in laboratory mesocosms. Consequently, husbandry and experimental conditions may often be sub-optimal. The Vortex Resuspension Tank (VoRT) is a simple and reliable system for the resuspension of food or sediments using an enclosed airlift. The particle rain from the lift is mixed in the tank by two water inputs that provide directional current flow across the study organism(s). The vortex mixing creates a turbulent lateral water flow that allows the distribution of particulate matter outwards from the sediment outflow. By calibrating a VoRT it is possible to control sedimentation rate by manipulating water and air flow rates. As an example application, three VoRTs were maintained under different sediment loadings to assess the sediment fraction utilisation and tube growth rates of the tube-building polychaete worm Sabellaria spinulosa. S. spinulosa consistently utilised a lower mean particle size than that of the background sediment when provided with well sorted medium sands. Under sediment starved conditions, there was net erosion of colonies whereas under intermediate and high sediment rates there was consistent cumulative growth throughout a 15 d experiment. This highlights the importance of suspended sediment for S. spinulosa and also the suitability of the VoRT system for maintaining organisms with suspended matter requirements.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology
Vol/bind370
Udgave nummer1-2
Sider (fra-til)35-40
ISSN0022-0981
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2009

Fingeraftryk

aquarium
aquariums
turbidity
case studies
sediments
resuspension
vortex
sediment
water flow
particulates
particulate matter
organisms
aquatic organisms
pollution load
food
air flow
Polychaeta
polychaete
aquatic organism
laboratory

Citer dette

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title = "Maintaining turbidity and current flow in laboratory aquarium studies, a case study using Sabellaria spinulosa",
abstract = "Many aquatic organisms rely on the suspension of particulate matter for food or for building materials, yet these conditions are difficult to replicate in laboratory mesocosms. Consequently, husbandry and experimental conditions may often be sub-optimal. The Vortex Resuspension Tank (VoRT) is a simple and reliable system for the resuspension of food or sediments using an enclosed airlift. The particle rain from the lift is mixed in the tank by two water inputs that provide directional current flow across the study organism(s). The vortex mixing creates a turbulent lateral water flow that allows the distribution of particulate matter outwards from the sediment outflow. By calibrating a VoRT it is possible to control sedimentation rate by manipulating water and air flow rates. As an example application, three VoRTs were maintained under different sediment loadings to assess the sediment fraction utilisation and tube growth rates of the tube-building polychaete worm Sabellaria spinulosa. S. spinulosa consistently utilised a lower mean particle size than that of the background sediment when provided with well sorted medium sands. Under sediment starved conditions, there was net erosion of colonies whereas under intermediate and high sediment rates there was consistent cumulative growth throughout a 15 d experiment. This highlights the importance of suspended sediment for S. spinulosa and also the suitability of the VoRT system for maintaining organisms with suspended matter requirements.",
keywords = "Current flow, Flow, Sabellaria spinulosa, Sediment, Suspension feeding, Tube growth, Turbidity",
author = "Davies, {Andrew J.} and {S. Last}, Kim and Karl Attard and Hendrick, {Vicki J.}",
year = "2009",
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Maintaining turbidity and current flow in laboratory aquarium studies, a case study using Sabellaria spinulosa. / Davies, Andrew J.; S. Last, Kim; Attard, Karl; Hendrick, Vicki J.

I: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, Bind 370, Nr. 1-2, 2009, s. 35-40.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maintaining turbidity and current flow in laboratory aquarium studies, a case study using Sabellaria spinulosa

AU - Davies, Andrew J.

AU - S. Last, Kim

AU - Attard, Karl

AU - Hendrick, Vicki J.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Many aquatic organisms rely on the suspension of particulate matter for food or for building materials, yet these conditions are difficult to replicate in laboratory mesocosms. Consequently, husbandry and experimental conditions may often be sub-optimal. The Vortex Resuspension Tank (VoRT) is a simple and reliable system for the resuspension of food or sediments using an enclosed airlift. The particle rain from the lift is mixed in the tank by two water inputs that provide directional current flow across the study organism(s). The vortex mixing creates a turbulent lateral water flow that allows the distribution of particulate matter outwards from the sediment outflow. By calibrating a VoRT it is possible to control sedimentation rate by manipulating water and air flow rates. As an example application, three VoRTs were maintained under different sediment loadings to assess the sediment fraction utilisation and tube growth rates of the tube-building polychaete worm Sabellaria spinulosa. S. spinulosa consistently utilised a lower mean particle size than that of the background sediment when provided with well sorted medium sands. Under sediment starved conditions, there was net erosion of colonies whereas under intermediate and high sediment rates there was consistent cumulative growth throughout a 15 d experiment. This highlights the importance of suspended sediment for S. spinulosa and also the suitability of the VoRT system for maintaining organisms with suspended matter requirements.

AB - Many aquatic organisms rely on the suspension of particulate matter for food or for building materials, yet these conditions are difficult to replicate in laboratory mesocosms. Consequently, husbandry and experimental conditions may often be sub-optimal. The Vortex Resuspension Tank (VoRT) is a simple and reliable system for the resuspension of food or sediments using an enclosed airlift. The particle rain from the lift is mixed in the tank by two water inputs that provide directional current flow across the study organism(s). The vortex mixing creates a turbulent lateral water flow that allows the distribution of particulate matter outwards from the sediment outflow. By calibrating a VoRT it is possible to control sedimentation rate by manipulating water and air flow rates. As an example application, three VoRTs were maintained under different sediment loadings to assess the sediment fraction utilisation and tube growth rates of the tube-building polychaete worm Sabellaria spinulosa. S. spinulosa consistently utilised a lower mean particle size than that of the background sediment when provided with well sorted medium sands. Under sediment starved conditions, there was net erosion of colonies whereas under intermediate and high sediment rates there was consistent cumulative growth throughout a 15 d experiment. This highlights the importance of suspended sediment for S. spinulosa and also the suitability of the VoRT system for maintaining organisms with suspended matter requirements.

KW - Current flow

KW - Flow

KW - Sabellaria spinulosa

KW - Sediment

KW - Suspension feeding

KW - Tube growth

KW - Turbidity

U2 - 10.1016/j.jembe.2008.11.015

DO - 10.1016/j.jembe.2008.11.015

M3 - Journal article

VL - 370

SP - 35

EP - 40

JO - Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology

JF - Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology

SN - 0022-0981

IS - 1-2

ER -