Low-volume high-intensity swim training is superior to high-volume low-intensity training in relation to insulin sensitivity and glucose control in inactive middle-aged women

Luke J Connolly, Nikolai Baastrup Nordsborg, Michael Nyberg, Pál Weihe, Peter Krustrup, Magni Mohr

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that low-volume high-intensity swimming has a larger impact on insulin sensitivity and glucose control than high-volume low-intensity swimming in inactive premenopausal women with mild hypertension.

METHODS: Sixty-two untrained premenopausal women were randomised to an inactive control (n = 20; CON), a high-intensity low-volume (n = 21; HIT) or a low-intensity high-volume (n = 21; LIT) training group. During the 15-week intervention period, HIT performed 3 weekly 6-10 × 30-s all-out swimming intervals (average heart rate (HR) = 86 ± 3 % HRmax) interspersed by 2-min recovery periods and LIT swam continuously for 1 h at low intensity (average HR = 73 ± 3 % HRmax). Fasting blood samples were taken and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted pre- and post-intervention.

RESULTS: After HIT, resting plasma [insulin] was lowered (17 ± 34 %; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Following HIT, 60-min OGTT plasma [insulin] and [glucose] was lowered (24 ± 30 % and 10 ± 16 %; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Total area under the curve for plasma [glucose] was lower (P < 0.05) after HIT than LIT (660 ± 141 vs. 860 ± 325 mmol min L(-1)). Insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) had increased (P < 0.05) by 22 ± 34 % after HIT, with no significant change after LIT or CON, respectively. Plasma soluble intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 was lowered (P < 0.05) by 4 ± 8 and 3 ± 9 % after HIT and CON, respectively, while plasma soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 had decreased (P < 0.05) by 8 ± 23 % after HIT only.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that low-volume high-intensity intermittent swimming is an effective and time-efficient training strategy for improving insulin sensitivity, glucose control and biomarkers of vascular function in inactive, middle-aged mildly hypertensive women.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology
Vol/bind116
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)1889-97
ISSN1439-6319
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2016

Fingeraftryk

Insulin Resistance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Insulin
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Area Under Curve
Fasting

Citer dette

@article{eeb9e073423c45cbbf0a33c164f52bdc,
title = "Low-volume high-intensity swim training is superior to high-volume low-intensity training in relation to insulin sensitivity and glucose control in inactive middle-aged women",
abstract = "PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that low-volume high-intensity swimming has a larger impact on insulin sensitivity and glucose control than high-volume low-intensity swimming in inactive premenopausal women with mild hypertension.METHODS: Sixty-two untrained premenopausal women were randomised to an inactive control (n = 20; CON), a high-intensity low-volume (n = 21; HIT) or a low-intensity high-volume (n = 21; LIT) training group. During the 15-week intervention period, HIT performed 3 weekly 6-10 × 30-s all-out swimming intervals (average heart rate (HR) = 86 ± 3 {\%} HRmax) interspersed by 2-min recovery periods and LIT swam continuously for 1 h at low intensity (average HR = 73 ± 3 {\%} HRmax). Fasting blood samples were taken and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted pre- and post-intervention.RESULTS: After HIT, resting plasma [insulin] was lowered (17 ± 34 {\%}; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Following HIT, 60-min OGTT plasma [insulin] and [glucose] was lowered (24 ± 30 {\%} and 10 ± 16 {\%}; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Total area under the curve for plasma [glucose] was lower (P < 0.05) after HIT than LIT (660 ± 141 vs. 860 ± 325 mmol min L(-1)). Insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) had increased (P < 0.05) by 22 ± 34 {\%} after HIT, with no significant change after LIT or CON, respectively. Plasma soluble intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 was lowered (P < 0.05) by 4 ± 8 and 3 ± 9 {\%} after HIT and CON, respectively, while plasma soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 had decreased (P < 0.05) by 8 ± 23 {\%} after HIT only.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that low-volume high-intensity intermittent swimming is an effective and time-efficient training strategy for improving insulin sensitivity, glucose control and biomarkers of vascular function in inactive, middle-aged mildly hypertensive women.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Connolly, {Luke J} and Nordsborg, {Nikolai Baastrup} and Michael Nyberg and P{\'a}l Weihe and Peter Krustrup and Magni Mohr",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1007/s00421-016-3441-8",
language = "English",
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pages = "1889--97",
journal = "European Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "1439-6319",
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Low-volume high-intensity swim training is superior to high-volume low-intensity training in relation to insulin sensitivity and glucose control in inactive middle-aged women. / Connolly, Luke J; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Nyberg, Michael; Weihe, Pál; Krustrup, Peter; Mohr, Magni.

I: European Journal of Applied Physiology, Bind 116, Nr. 10, 2016, s. 1889-97.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low-volume high-intensity swim training is superior to high-volume low-intensity training in relation to insulin sensitivity and glucose control in inactive middle-aged women

AU - Connolly, Luke J

AU - Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup

AU - Nyberg, Michael

AU - Weihe, Pál

AU - Krustrup, Peter

AU - Mohr, Magni

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that low-volume high-intensity swimming has a larger impact on insulin sensitivity and glucose control than high-volume low-intensity swimming in inactive premenopausal women with mild hypertension.METHODS: Sixty-two untrained premenopausal women were randomised to an inactive control (n = 20; CON), a high-intensity low-volume (n = 21; HIT) or a low-intensity high-volume (n = 21; LIT) training group. During the 15-week intervention period, HIT performed 3 weekly 6-10 × 30-s all-out swimming intervals (average heart rate (HR) = 86 ± 3 % HRmax) interspersed by 2-min recovery periods and LIT swam continuously for 1 h at low intensity (average HR = 73 ± 3 % HRmax). Fasting blood samples were taken and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted pre- and post-intervention.RESULTS: After HIT, resting plasma [insulin] was lowered (17 ± 34 %; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Following HIT, 60-min OGTT plasma [insulin] and [glucose] was lowered (24 ± 30 % and 10 ± 16 %; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Total area under the curve for plasma [glucose] was lower (P < 0.05) after HIT than LIT (660 ± 141 vs. 860 ± 325 mmol min L(-1)). Insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) had increased (P < 0.05) by 22 ± 34 % after HIT, with no significant change after LIT or CON, respectively. Plasma soluble intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 was lowered (P < 0.05) by 4 ± 8 and 3 ± 9 % after HIT and CON, respectively, while plasma soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 had decreased (P < 0.05) by 8 ± 23 % after HIT only.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that low-volume high-intensity intermittent swimming is an effective and time-efficient training strategy for improving insulin sensitivity, glucose control and biomarkers of vascular function in inactive, middle-aged mildly hypertensive women.

AB - PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that low-volume high-intensity swimming has a larger impact on insulin sensitivity and glucose control than high-volume low-intensity swimming in inactive premenopausal women with mild hypertension.METHODS: Sixty-two untrained premenopausal women were randomised to an inactive control (n = 20; CON), a high-intensity low-volume (n = 21; HIT) or a low-intensity high-volume (n = 21; LIT) training group. During the 15-week intervention period, HIT performed 3 weekly 6-10 × 30-s all-out swimming intervals (average heart rate (HR) = 86 ± 3 % HRmax) interspersed by 2-min recovery periods and LIT swam continuously for 1 h at low intensity (average HR = 73 ± 3 % HRmax). Fasting blood samples were taken and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted pre- and post-intervention.RESULTS: After HIT, resting plasma [insulin] was lowered (17 ± 34 %; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Following HIT, 60-min OGTT plasma [insulin] and [glucose] was lowered (24 ± 30 % and 10 ± 16 %; P < 0.05) but remained similar after LIT and CON. Total area under the curve for plasma [glucose] was lower (P < 0.05) after HIT than LIT (660 ± 141 vs. 860 ± 325 mmol min L(-1)). Insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR) had increased (P < 0.05) by 22 ± 34 % after HIT, with no significant change after LIT or CON, respectively. Plasma soluble intracellular cell adhesion molecule 1 was lowered (P < 0.05) by 4 ± 8 and 3 ± 9 % after HIT and CON, respectively, while plasma soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 had decreased (P < 0.05) by 8 ± 23 % after HIT only.CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that low-volume high-intensity intermittent swimming is an effective and time-efficient training strategy for improving insulin sensitivity, glucose control and biomarkers of vascular function in inactive, middle-aged mildly hypertensive women.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-016-3441-8

DO - 10.1007/s00421-016-3441-8

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27473445

VL - 116

SP - 1889

EP - 1897

JO - European Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - European Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 1439-6319

IS - 10

ER -