Lightning, IT Diffusion, and Economic Growth across US States

Thomas Barnebeck Andersen, Carl-Johan Lars Dalgaard, Pablo Selaya, Jeanet Sinding Bentzen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Empirically, a higher frequency of lightning strikes is associated with slower growth in labor productivity across the 48 contiguous U.S. states after 1990; before 1990, there is no correlation between growth and lightning. Other climate variables (e.g., temperature, rainfall, and tornadoes) do not conform to this pattern. A viable explanation is that lightning influences IT diffusion. By causing voltage spikes and dips, a higher frequency of ground strikes leads to damaged digital equipment and thus higher IT user costs. Accordingly, the flash density (strikes per square kilometer per year) should adversely affect the speed of IT diffusion. We find that lightning indeed seems to have slowed IT diffusion, conditional on standard controls. Hence, an increasing macroeconomic sensitivity to lightning may be due to the increasing importance of digital technologies for the growth process.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftReview of Economics and Statistics
Vol/bind94
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)903-924
ISSN0034-6535
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Fingeraftryk

strike
economic growth
labor productivity
macroeconomics
climate
costs
U.S. States
Economic growth

Citer dette

Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck ; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars ; Selaya, Pablo ; Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding. / Lightning, IT Diffusion, and Economic Growth across US States. I: Review of Economics and Statistics. 2012 ; Bind 94, Nr. 4. s. 903-924.
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Lightning, IT Diffusion, and Economic Growth across US States. / Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck; Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Selaya, Pablo; Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding.

I: Review of Economics and Statistics, Bind 94, Nr. 4, 2012, s. 903-924.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Selaya, Pablo

AU - Bentzen, Jeanet Sinding

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