Life not death

Epidemiology from skeletons

George R. Milner*, Jesper L. Boldsen

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Analytically sophisticated paleoepidemiology is a relatively new development in the characterization of past life experiences. It is based on sound paleopathological observations, accurate age-at-death estimates, an explicit engagement with the nature of mortality samples, and analytical procedures that owe much to epidemiology. Of foremost importance is an emphasis on people, not skeletons. Transforming information gleaned from the dead, a biased sample of individuals who were once alive at each age, into a form that is informative about past life experiences has been a major challenge for bioarchaeologists, but recent work shows it can be done. The further development of paleoepidemiology includes essential contributions from paleopathology, archaeology or history (as appropriate), and epidemiology.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Paleopathology
Vol/bind17
Sider (fra-til)26-39
ISSN1879-9817
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Life Change Events
Skeleton
Paleopathology
Epidemiology
History
Age at Death
Sound
Mortality
Archaeology

Citer dette

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Life not death : Epidemiology from skeletons. / Milner, George R.; Boldsen, Jesper L.

I: International Journal of Paleopathology, Bind 17, 2017, s. 26-39.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Boldsen, Jesper L.

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