Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability

Karsten Hedegaard, Katrine Thyø, Henrik Wenzel

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

Resumé

Among the existing environmental assessments of bioethanol for transport, the studies suggesting an environmental benefit of bioethanol all ignore the constraints on the availability of biomass resources and the implications competition for biomass has on the assessment. We show that toward 2030, regardless of whether a global or European perspective is applied, the amount of biomass, which can become available for bioethanol or other energy uses, will be physically and economically constrained. This implies that use of biomass or land for bioethanol production will most likely happen at the expense of alternative uses. Since natural gas and coal will be used as fuels for heat and power production at least within this time frame, the lost alternatives include substitution of natural gas or coal in the heat and power sector. In a case study, we investigate the environmental feasibility of using advanced fermentation based bioethanol for transport, when held up against the consequence of losing alternative biomass utilizations. The biomass feedstock considered is an energy whole-crop in the form of whole-crop maize and the bioethanol technology considered includes fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. We show that for the case of this advanced bioethanol technology, in terms of reducing greenhouse emissions and fossil fuel dependency, more is lost than gained when prioritizing biomass or land for bioethanol. Technology pathways involving heat and power production and/or biogas, natural gas or electricity for transport are advantageous. This is mainly caused by the significant energy conversion losses in bioethanol production compared to use of biomass in the energy sector. The losses lie in the need for pretreatment (lignocellulosic based production), the relatively low fermentation yield of ethanol, the need to dry and further process the byproduct and residual unconverted matter in order to make use of them, and the need to separate ethanol and water, implying distillation.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2009
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 2009
BegivenhedBITs 2nd Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology - Seoul, Sydkorea
Varighed: 5. apr. 20097. apr. 2009

Konference

KonferenceBITs 2nd Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology
LandSydkorea
BySeoul
Periode05/04/200907/04/2009

Fingeraftryk

Bioethanol
Life cycle
Biomass
Availability
Fermentation
Natural gas
Crops
Ethanol
Coal
Greenhouses
Biogas
Fossil fuels
Energy conversion
Distillation
Feedstocks
Byproducts
Substitution reactions
Electricity

Citer dette

Hedegaard, K., Thyø, K., & Wenzel, H. (2009). Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability. Abstract fra BITs 2nd Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology, Seoul, Sydkorea.
Hedegaard, Karsten ; Thyø, Katrine ; Wenzel, Henrik. / Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability. Abstract fra BITs 2nd Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology, Seoul, Sydkorea.1 s.
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Hedegaard, K, Thyø, K & Wenzel, H 2009, 'Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability' BITs 2nd Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology, Seoul, Sydkorea, 05/04/2009 - 07/04/2009, .

Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability. / Hedegaard, Karsten; Thyø, Katrine; Wenzel, Henrik.

2009. Abstract fra BITs 2nd Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology, Seoul, Sydkorea.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability

AU - Hedegaard, Karsten

AU - Thyø, Katrine

AU - Wenzel, Henrik

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Among the existing environmental assessments of bioethanol for transport, the studies suggesting an environmental benefit of bioethanol all ignore the constraints on the availability of biomass resources and the implications competition for biomass has on the assessment. We show that toward 2030, regardless of whether a global or European perspective is applied, the amount of biomass, which can become available for bioethanol or other energy uses, will be physically and economically constrained. This implies that use of biomass or land for bioethanol production will most likely happen at the expense of alternative uses. Since natural gas and coal will be used as fuels for heat and power production at least within this time frame, the lost alternatives include substitution of natural gas or coal in the heat and power sector. In a case study, we investigate the environmental feasibility of using advanced fermentation based bioethanol for transport, when held up against the consequence of losing alternative biomass utilizations. The biomass feedstock considered is an energy whole-crop in the form of whole-crop maize and the bioethanol technology considered includes fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. We show that for the case of this advanced bioethanol technology, in terms of reducing greenhouse emissions and fossil fuel dependency, more is lost than gained when prioritizing biomass or land for bioethanol. Technology pathways involving heat and power production and/or biogas, natural gas or electricity for transport are advantageous. This is mainly caused by the significant energy conversion losses in bioethanol production compared to use of biomass in the energy sector. The losses lie in the need for pretreatment (lignocellulosic based production), the relatively low fermentation yield of ethanol, the need to dry and further process the byproduct and residual unconverted matter in order to make use of them, and the need to separate ethanol and water, implying distillation.

AB - Among the existing environmental assessments of bioethanol for transport, the studies suggesting an environmental benefit of bioethanol all ignore the constraints on the availability of biomass resources and the implications competition for biomass has on the assessment. We show that toward 2030, regardless of whether a global or European perspective is applied, the amount of biomass, which can become available for bioethanol or other energy uses, will be physically and economically constrained. This implies that use of biomass or land for bioethanol production will most likely happen at the expense of alternative uses. Since natural gas and coal will be used as fuels for heat and power production at least within this time frame, the lost alternatives include substitution of natural gas or coal in the heat and power sector. In a case study, we investigate the environmental feasibility of using advanced fermentation based bioethanol for transport, when held up against the consequence of losing alternative biomass utilizations. The biomass feedstock considered is an energy whole-crop in the form of whole-crop maize and the bioethanol technology considered includes fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. We show that for the case of this advanced bioethanol technology, in terms of reducing greenhouse emissions and fossil fuel dependency, more is lost than gained when prioritizing biomass or land for bioethanol. Technology pathways involving heat and power production and/or biogas, natural gas or electricity for transport are advantageous. This is mainly caused by the significant energy conversion losses in bioethanol production compared to use of biomass in the energy sector. The losses lie in the need for pretreatment (lignocellulosic based production), the relatively low fermentation yield of ethanol, the need to dry and further process the byproduct and residual unconverted matter in order to make use of them, and the need to separate ethanol and water, implying distillation.

KW - Bio-ethanol, LCA

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Hedegaard K, Thyø K, Wenzel H. Life Cycle Assessment of an Advanced Bioethanol Technology in the Perspective of Constrained Biomass Availability. 2009. Abstract fra BITs 2nd Annual World Congress of Industrial Biotechnology, Seoul, Sydkorea.