Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction

Andrea Valente, Karl Kristoffer Jensen

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Resumé

Young music learners face a number of challenges, mostly because musical theory and practice are deeply interrelated. Many musical teaching theories and methodologies exist, and music is taught today from primary school, in a variety of ways, and to different degrees of success.

We proposal to consider an existing teaching tool from the computer science domain, computational cards, and modify it to cope with the specific problems found in musical education; we re-designed it, simplified and generalized its notation. The new tool, musiCards, also permits corporeal interaction, so children can design interactive musical machines, implement them physically, then enact the interaction to generate musical performances. MusiCards enables pupils to explore music-related concepts such as rhythm and polyphonic performance; moreover it supports active involvement, imitation, group learning and sequential learning.

To allow for different modalities of interaction and cooperation, MusiCards has multiple implementations: a software simulator, a paper table-top version, and a corporeal version, in which the participants run, sing and play instruments. Field experimentations are planned for the coming summer.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelSystems research in the arts and humanities : symposium proceedings, volume II : on interaction/interactivity in music, design, visual and performative arts
RedaktørerGeorge E. Lasker
Vol/bindII
ForlagInternational Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany)
Publikationsdato2008
ISBN (Trykt)978-1-897233-09-2
StatusUdgivet - 2008
Udgivet eksterntJa

Fingeraftryk

music
musical education
interaction
learning
imitation
Teaching
computer science
performance
primary school
pupil
methodology
Group
software

Citer dette

Valente, A., & Jensen, K. K. (2008). Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction. I G. E. Lasker (red.), Systems research in the arts and humanities: symposium proceedings, volume II : on interaction/interactivity in music, design, visual and performative arts (Bind II). International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany).
Valente, Andrea ; Jensen, Karl Kristoffer. / Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction. Systems research in the arts and humanities: symposium proceedings, volume II : on interaction/interactivity in music, design, visual and performative arts. red. / George E. Lasker. Bind II International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany), 2008.
@inproceedings{4cadff2e54314b4db9521707aa1a237f,
title = "Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction",
abstract = "Young music learners face a number of challenges, mostly because musical theory and practice are deeply interrelated. Many musical teaching theories and methodologies exist, and music is taught today from primary school, in a variety of ways, and to different degrees of success.We proposal to consider an existing teaching tool from the computer science domain, computational cards, and modify it to cope with the specific problems found in musical education; we re-designed it, simplified and generalized its notation. The new tool, musiCards, also permits corporeal interaction, so children can design interactive musical machines, implement them physically, then enact the interaction to generate musical performances. MusiCards enables pupils to explore music-related concepts such as rhythm and polyphonic performance; moreover it supports active involvement, imitation, group learning and sequential learning.To allow for different modalities of interaction and cooperation, MusiCards has multiple implementations: a software simulator, a paper table-top version, and a corporeal version, in which the participants run, sing and play instruments. Field experimentations are planned for the coming summer.",
author = "Andrea Valente and Jensen, {Karl Kristoffer}",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-1-897233-09-2",
volume = "II",
editor = "Lasker, {George E.}",
booktitle = "Systems research in the arts and humanities",
publisher = "International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany)",

}

Valente, A & Jensen, KK 2008, Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction. i GE Lasker (red.), Systems research in the arts and humanities: symposium proceedings, volume II : on interaction/interactivity in music, design, visual and performative arts. bind II, International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany).

Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction. / Valente, Andrea; Jensen, Karl Kristoffer.

Systems research in the arts and humanities: symposium proceedings, volume II : on interaction/interactivity in music, design, visual and performative arts. red. / George E. Lasker. Bind II International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany), 2008.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

TY - GEN

T1 - Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction

AU - Valente, Andrea

AU - Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Young music learners face a number of challenges, mostly because musical theory and practice are deeply interrelated. Many musical teaching theories and methodologies exist, and music is taught today from primary school, in a variety of ways, and to different degrees of success.We proposal to consider an existing teaching tool from the computer science domain, computational cards, and modify it to cope with the specific problems found in musical education; we re-designed it, simplified and generalized its notation. The new tool, musiCards, also permits corporeal interaction, so children can design interactive musical machines, implement them physically, then enact the interaction to generate musical performances. MusiCards enables pupils to explore music-related concepts such as rhythm and polyphonic performance; moreover it supports active involvement, imitation, group learning and sequential learning.To allow for different modalities of interaction and cooperation, MusiCards has multiple implementations: a software simulator, a paper table-top version, and a corporeal version, in which the participants run, sing and play instruments. Field experimentations are planned for the coming summer.

AB - Young music learners face a number of challenges, mostly because musical theory and practice are deeply interrelated. Many musical teaching theories and methodologies exist, and music is taught today from primary school, in a variety of ways, and to different degrees of success.We proposal to consider an existing teaching tool from the computer science domain, computational cards, and modify it to cope with the specific problems found in musical education; we re-designed it, simplified and generalized its notation. The new tool, musiCards, also permits corporeal interaction, so children can design interactive musical machines, implement them physically, then enact the interaction to generate musical performances. MusiCards enables pupils to explore music-related concepts such as rhythm and polyphonic performance; moreover it supports active involvement, imitation, group learning and sequential learning.To allow for different modalities of interaction and cooperation, MusiCards has multiple implementations: a software simulator, a paper table-top version, and a corporeal version, in which the participants run, sing and play instruments. Field experimentations are planned for the coming summer.

M3 - Article in proceedings

SN - 978-1-897233-09-2

VL - II

BT - Systems research in the arts and humanities

A2 - Lasker, George E.

PB - International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany)

ER -

Valente A, Jensen KK. Learning Music via Tangible and Corporeal Interaction. I Lasker GE, red., Systems research in the arts and humanities: symposium proceedings, volume II : on interaction/interactivity in music, design, visual and performative arts. Bind II. International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics (Baden-Baden, Germany). 2008