Knowing me, knowing you: Self- and collective interests in goal development in asymmetric relationships

Kristin Balslev Munksgaard, Rhona E. Johnsen, Charlotte Maria Patterson

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This paper investigates how self-interests and collective interests in goal development are manifested in the context of asymmetric customer-supplier relationships. Taking an interaction approach (IMP Group, 1982), a conceptual structure highlighting possible patterns of characteristics of the asymmetric customer-supplier relationship and approaches to self- and/or collective interests in goal development has been created.Based on a multiple case study approach, the findings suggest that smaller suppliers who deliberately pursue self-interest in their business activities with larger customers experience better outcomes. Larger customers recognise that the creation of collective business goals enhances the outcome of joint efforts in terms of market impact and profitability. The findings also highlight that trust is perceived as a necessity for the development of collective interests in asymmetric relationships and that the power of the larger customer is not perceived as a constraint. A key conceptual contribution is the identification of two distinct types of asymmetric relationships: 'product/technology-oriented' in which self-interest dominates by focusing on one party's resources for developing new products or technology and 'complementary competencies-oriented' in which collective interests link the competencies of the larger and smaller party for new joint business ambitions.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftIndustrial Marketing Management
Vol/bind48
Sider (fra-til)160–173
ISSN0019-8501
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Fingeraftryk

Customer-supplier relationships
Competency
Multiple case study
Profitability
Resources
Business activity
Suppliers
New products
Interaction
Product technology
Market impact
Customer experience

Bibliografisk note

Epub

Citer dette

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abstract = "This paper investigates how self-interests and collective interests in goal development are manifested in the context of asymmetric customer-supplier relationships. Taking an interaction approach (IMP Group, 1982), a conceptual structure highlighting possible patterns of characteristics of the asymmetric customer-supplier relationship and approaches to self- and/or collective interests in goal development has been created.Based on a multiple case study approach, the findings suggest that smaller suppliers who deliberately pursue self-interest in their business activities with larger customers experience better outcomes. Larger customers recognise that the creation of collective business goals enhances the outcome of joint efforts in terms of market impact and profitability. The findings also highlight that trust is perceived as a necessity for the development of collective interests in asymmetric relationships and that the power of the larger customer is not perceived as a constraint. A key conceptual contribution is the identification of two distinct types of asymmetric relationships: 'product/technology-oriented' in which self-interest dominates by focusing on one party's resources for developing new products or technology and 'complementary competencies-oriented' in which collective interests link the competencies of the larger and smaller party for new joint business ambitions.",
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Knowing me, knowing you : Self- and collective interests in goal development in asymmetric relationships. / Munksgaard, Kristin Balslev; Johnsen, Rhona E.; Patterson, Charlotte Maria.

I: Industrial Marketing Management, Bind 48, 2015, s. 160–173.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

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AB - This paper investigates how self-interests and collective interests in goal development are manifested in the context of asymmetric customer-supplier relationships. Taking an interaction approach (IMP Group, 1982), a conceptual structure highlighting possible patterns of characteristics of the asymmetric customer-supplier relationship and approaches to self- and/or collective interests in goal development has been created.Based on a multiple case study approach, the findings suggest that smaller suppliers who deliberately pursue self-interest in their business activities with larger customers experience better outcomes. Larger customers recognise that the creation of collective business goals enhances the outcome of joint efforts in terms of market impact and profitability. The findings also highlight that trust is perceived as a necessity for the development of collective interests in asymmetric relationships and that the power of the larger customer is not perceived as a constraint. A key conceptual contribution is the identification of two distinct types of asymmetric relationships: 'product/technology-oriented' in which self-interest dominates by focusing on one party's resources for developing new products or technology and 'complementary competencies-oriented' in which collective interests link the competencies of the larger and smaller party for new joint business ambitions.

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