Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland

Charlotte Jeppesen

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

Resumé

Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland

Charlotte Jeppesen, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark

OBJECTIVE

The traditional diet of Inuit living in Greenland consists of marine mammals, reindeer, wild fowls and fish. Within the last 50 years consumption of imported Western foods has increased, as have the prevalence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate whether the contribution of traditional foods to the dietary macronutrient composition differs across gender and age.

METHODS

Data were collected in a cross-sectional study in West Greenland among 2246 Inuit ≥ 18 years. Food intake was examined by an interviewer-administered food-frequency questionnaire: 23 of 70 items consisted of Greenlandic foods, e.g. seal, whale, reindeer, musk ox, local birds and fish. All analyses (Kruskal-Wallis) were split by sex and age (18-24, 25-34, 35-59, 60+ years).

RESULTS

Intake of energy, protein, carbohydrate, and fat from traditional foods increased significant with increasing age (p<0.0001). Total carbohydrate intake decreased with increasing age (p<0.0001). The youngest age groups (18-24 and 25-34 years old) had significantly higher intake of refined sugar from candy, cakes and beverages (p<0.0001). Participants age 18-24 also had the highest energy intake from fast food, like burger, pizza, and salted snacks, followed by the age group of 25-34 year old (p<0.0001).

CONCLUSION

In Greenland, the consumption of traditional foods is influenced both by sex and age. The macronutrients in the diet of young Greenlanders are mainly contributed by imported foods. These findings support the hypothesis that young Inuit are moving toward a westernised diet, which can lead to public health consequences in the future.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2008
StatusUdgivet - 2008
BegivenhedINCHR - Tromsø, Norge
Varighed: 12. maj 200816. maj 2008

Konference

KonferenceINCHR
LandNorge
ByTromsø
Periode12/05/200816/05/2008

Fingeraftryk

Health Transition
Greenland
Diet
Food
Reindeer
Fishes
Public Health
Age Groups
Whales
Fast Foods
Snacks
Mammals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fats
Interviews

Citer dette

Jeppesen, C. (2008). Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland. Abstract fra INCHR, Tromsø, Norge.
Jeppesen, Charlotte. / Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland. Abstract fra INCHR, Tromsø, Norge.
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title = "Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland",
abstract = "Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in GreenlandCharlotte Jeppesen, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, DenmarkOBJECTIVEThe traditional diet of Inuit living in Greenland consists of marine mammals, reindeer, wild fowls and fish. Within the last 50 years consumption of imported Western foods has increased, as have the prevalence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate whether the contribution of traditional foods to the dietary macronutrient composition differs across gender and age.METHODSData were collected in a cross-sectional study in West Greenland among 2246 Inuit ≥ 18 years. Food intake was examined by an interviewer-administered food-frequency questionnaire: 23 of 70 items consisted of Greenlandic foods, e.g. seal, whale, reindeer, musk ox, local birds and fish. All analyses (Kruskal-Wallis) were split by sex and age (18-24, 25-34, 35-59, 60+ years).RESULTSIntake of energy, protein, carbohydrate, and fat from traditional foods increased significant with increasing age (p<0.0001). Total carbohydrate intake decreased with increasing age (p<0.0001). The youngest age groups (18-24 and 25-34 years old) had significantly higher intake of refined sugar from candy, cakes and beverages (p<0.0001). Participants age 18-24 also had the highest energy intake from fast food, like burger, pizza, and salted snacks, followed by the age group of 25-34 year old (p<0.0001).CONCLUSIONIn Greenland, the consumption of traditional foods is influenced both by sex and age. The macronutrients in the diet of young Greenlanders are mainly contributed by imported foods. These findings support the hypothesis that young Inuit are moving toward a westernised diet, which can lead to public health consequences in the future.",
author = "Charlotte Jeppesen",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 12-05-2008 Through 16-05-2008",

}

Jeppesen, C 2008, 'Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland' INCHR, Tromsø, Norge, 12/05/2008 - 16/05/2008, .

Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland. / Jeppesen, Charlotte.

2008. Abstract fra INCHR, Tromsø, Norge.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland

AU - Jeppesen, Charlotte

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in GreenlandCharlotte Jeppesen, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, DenmarkOBJECTIVEThe traditional diet of Inuit living in Greenland consists of marine mammals, reindeer, wild fowls and fish. Within the last 50 years consumption of imported Western foods has increased, as have the prevalence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate whether the contribution of traditional foods to the dietary macronutrient composition differs across gender and age.METHODSData were collected in a cross-sectional study in West Greenland among 2246 Inuit ≥ 18 years. Food intake was examined by an interviewer-administered food-frequency questionnaire: 23 of 70 items consisted of Greenlandic foods, e.g. seal, whale, reindeer, musk ox, local birds and fish. All analyses (Kruskal-Wallis) were split by sex and age (18-24, 25-34, 35-59, 60+ years).RESULTSIntake of energy, protein, carbohydrate, and fat from traditional foods increased significant with increasing age (p<0.0001). Total carbohydrate intake decreased with increasing age (p<0.0001). The youngest age groups (18-24 and 25-34 years old) had significantly higher intake of refined sugar from candy, cakes and beverages (p<0.0001). Participants age 18-24 also had the highest energy intake from fast food, like burger, pizza, and salted snacks, followed by the age group of 25-34 year old (p<0.0001).CONCLUSIONIn Greenland, the consumption of traditional foods is influenced both by sex and age. The macronutrients in the diet of young Greenlanders are mainly contributed by imported foods. These findings support the hypothesis that young Inuit are moving toward a westernised diet, which can lead to public health consequences in the future.

AB - Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in GreenlandCharlotte Jeppesen, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, DenmarkOBJECTIVEThe traditional diet of Inuit living in Greenland consists of marine mammals, reindeer, wild fowls and fish. Within the last 50 years consumption of imported Western foods has increased, as have the prevalence of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This study aims to investigate whether the contribution of traditional foods to the dietary macronutrient composition differs across gender and age.METHODSData were collected in a cross-sectional study in West Greenland among 2246 Inuit ≥ 18 years. Food intake was examined by an interviewer-administered food-frequency questionnaire: 23 of 70 items consisted of Greenlandic foods, e.g. seal, whale, reindeer, musk ox, local birds and fish. All analyses (Kruskal-Wallis) were split by sex and age (18-24, 25-34, 35-59, 60+ years).RESULTSIntake of energy, protein, carbohydrate, and fat from traditional foods increased significant with increasing age (p<0.0001). Total carbohydrate intake decreased with increasing age (p<0.0001). The youngest age groups (18-24 and 25-34 years old) had significantly higher intake of refined sugar from candy, cakes and beverages (p<0.0001). Participants age 18-24 also had the highest energy intake from fast food, like burger, pizza, and salted snacks, followed by the age group of 25-34 year old (p<0.0001).CONCLUSIONIn Greenland, the consumption of traditional foods is influenced both by sex and age. The macronutrients in the diet of young Greenlanders are mainly contributed by imported foods. These findings support the hypothesis that young Inuit are moving toward a westernised diet, which can lead to public health consequences in the future.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Jeppesen C. Inuit Health in Transition - the diet of young Inuit in Greenland. 2008. Abstract fra INCHR, Tromsø, Norge.