Introduction

Gerhard Besier, Katarzyna Stoklosa

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

The events in Ukraine and Russia since November 2013, and the subsequent incorporation of Crimea into the Russian state in March 2014, with the support of some circles of inhabitants of the peninsula, demonstrate that the desire to belong to the Western part of the European continent is not necessarily always the case. In some instances, people do prefer to belong to the Eastern part of Europe. This development in Crimea was proof that the reason for the desire to be part of either Western or Eastern Europe invariably lies in the knowledge, the cognition and perception of peoples’ environment, their personal experiences and values they have already gained. Most of the inhabitants of Crimea had not had the opportunity to experience the European Union personally; they were only familiar with Eastern Europe, and primarily Russia. This experience resulted in a sense of confidence in Russia and distrust regarding the European Union-including its ‘foreign’ culture that has been called, with a clear negative connotation, ‘imperialistic’ and ‘capitalistic’ for 70 years. Needless to say, cultural traditions that separate ‘The East’ from ‘The West’ have existed for centuries and accordingly created different myths and legends. These gaps are not bridged, but deepened, renovated and supported by authoritarian political regimes – for instance by the Putin Government and the ‘Russian’ religion. Thus Russian Orthodoxy is used for establishing a particularly different Eurasian culture.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelNeighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis : From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?
RedaktørerGerhard Besier, Katarzyna Stoklosa
Udgivelses stedLondon and New York
ForlagRoutledge
Publikationsdato2017
Sider1-10
Kapitel1
ISBN (Trykt)978-1-4724-8494-9
StatusUdgivet - 2017
NavnPost-Soviet Politics

Fingeraftryk

Russia
Eastern Europe
inhabitant
experience
political regime
Ukraine
Western Europe
cognition
myth
confidence
Religion
event
Values

Citer dette

Besier, G., & Stoklosa, K. (2017). Introduction. I G. Besier, & K. Stoklosa (red.), Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia? (s. 1-10). London and New York: Routledge. Post-Soviet Politics
Besier, Gerhard ; Stoklosa, Katarzyna . / Introduction. Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?. red. / Gerhard Besier ; Katarzyna Stoklosa. London and New York : Routledge, 2017. s. 1-10 (Post-Soviet Politics).
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Besier, G & Stoklosa, K 2017, Introduction. i G Besier & K Stoklosa (red), Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?. Routledge, London and New York, Post-Soviet Politics, s. 1-10.

Introduction. / Besier, Gerhard; Stoklosa, Katarzyna .

Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?. red. / Gerhard Besier; Katarzyna Stoklosa. London and New York : Routledge, 2017. s. 1-10 (Post-Soviet Politics).

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

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Besier G, Stoklosa K. Introduction. I Besier G, Stoklosa K, red., Neighbourhood Perceptions of the Ukraine Crisis: From the Soviet Union into Eurasia?. London and New York: Routledge. 2017. s. 1-10. (Post-Soviet Politics).