International comparison of observation-specific spatial buffers

maximizing the ability to estimate physical activity

Lawrence D Frank, Eric H Fox, Jared M Ulmer, James E Chapman, Suzanne E Kershaw, James F Sallis, Terry L Conway, Ester Cerin, Kelli L Cain, Marc A Adams, Graham Radford-Smith, Erica Hinckson, Suzanne Mavoa, Lars B Christiansen, Adriano Akira Ferreira Hino, Adalberto A S Lopes, Jasper Schipperijn

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Resumé

BACKGROUND: Advancements in geographic information systems over the past two decades have increased the specificity by which an individual's neighborhood environment may be spatially defined for physical activity and health research. This study investigated how different types of street network buffering methods compared in measuring a set of commonly used built environment measures (BEMs) and tested their performance on associations with physical activity outcomes.

METHODS: An internationally-developed set of objective BEMs using three different spatial buffering techniques were used to evaluate the relative differences in resulting explanatory power on self-reported physical activity outcomes. BEMs were developed in five countries using 'sausage,' 'detailed-trimmed,' and 'detailed,' network buffers at a distance of 1 km around participant household addresses (n = 5883).

RESULTS: BEM values were significantly different (p < 0.05) for 96% of sausage versus detailed-trimmed buffer comparisons and 89% of sausage versus detailed network buffer comparisons. Results showed that BEM coefficients in physical activity models did not differ significantly across buffering methods, and in most cases BEM associations with physical activity outcomes had the same level of statistical significance across buffer types. However, BEM coefficients differed in significance for 9% of the sausage versus detailed models, which may warrant further investigation.

CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study inform the selection of spatial buffering methods to estimate physical activity outcomes using an internationally consistent set of BEMs. Using three different network-based buffering methods, the findings indicate significant variation among BEM values, however associations with physical activity outcomes were similar across each buffering technique. The study advances knowledge by presenting consistently assessed relationships between three different network buffer types and utilitarian travel, sedentary behavior, and leisure-oriented physical activity outcomes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer4
TidsskriftInternational Journal of Health Geographics
Vol/bind16
Antal sider13
ISSN1476-072X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Observation
Geographic information systems
Health
Geographic Information Systems
Leisure Activities
Built environment
Buffer
Physical activity
International comparison
Research

Citer dette

Frank, Lawrence D ; Fox, Eric H ; Ulmer, Jared M ; Chapman, James E ; Kershaw, Suzanne E ; Sallis, James F ; Conway, Terry L ; Cerin, Ester ; Cain, Kelli L ; Adams, Marc A ; Radford-Smith, Graham ; Hinckson, Erica ; Mavoa, Suzanne ; Christiansen, Lars B ; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira ; Lopes, Adalberto A S ; Schipperijn, Jasper. / International comparison of observation-specific spatial buffers : maximizing the ability to estimate physical activity. I: International Journal of Health Geographics. 2017 ; Bind 16.
@article{fdb22f48dccb4859a60f412c06974bb5,
title = "International comparison of observation-specific spatial buffers: maximizing the ability to estimate physical activity",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Advancements in geographic information systems over the past two decades have increased the specificity by which an individual's neighborhood environment may be spatially defined for physical activity and health research. This study investigated how different types of street network buffering methods compared in measuring a set of commonly used built environment measures (BEMs) and tested their performance on associations with physical activity outcomes.METHODS: An internationally-developed set of objective BEMs using three different spatial buffering techniques were used to evaluate the relative differences in resulting explanatory power on self-reported physical activity outcomes. BEMs were developed in five countries using 'sausage,' 'detailed-trimmed,' and 'detailed,' network buffers at a distance of 1 km around participant household addresses (n = 5883).RESULTS: BEM values were significantly different (p < 0.05) for 96{\%} of sausage versus detailed-trimmed buffer comparisons and 89{\%} of sausage versus detailed network buffer comparisons. Results showed that BEM coefficients in physical activity models did not differ significantly across buffering methods, and in most cases BEM associations with physical activity outcomes had the same level of statistical significance across buffer types. However, BEM coefficients differed in significance for 9{\%} of the sausage versus detailed models, which may warrant further investigation.CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study inform the selection of spatial buffering methods to estimate physical activity outcomes using an internationally consistent set of BEMs. Using three different network-based buffering methods, the findings indicate significant variation among BEM values, however associations with physical activity outcomes were similar across each buffering technique. The study advances knowledge by presenting consistently assessed relationships between three different network buffer types and utilitarian travel, sedentary behavior, and leisure-oriented physical activity outcomes.",
author = "Frank, {Lawrence D} and Fox, {Eric H} and Ulmer, {Jared M} and Chapman, {James E} and Kershaw, {Suzanne E} and Sallis, {James F} and Conway, {Terry L} and Ester Cerin and Cain, {Kelli L} and Adams, {Marc A} and Graham Radford-Smith and Erica Hinckson and Suzanne Mavoa and Christiansen, {Lars B} and Hino, {Adriano Akira Ferreira} and Lopes, {Adalberto A S} and Jasper Schipperijn",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1186/s12942-017-0077-9",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "International Journal of Health Geographics",
issn = "1476-072X",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

Frank, LD, Fox, EH, Ulmer, JM, Chapman, JE, Kershaw, SE, Sallis, JF, Conway, TL, Cerin, E, Cain, KL, Adams, MA, Radford-Smith, G, Hinckson, E, Mavoa, S, Christiansen, LB, Hino, AAF, Lopes, AAS & Schipperijn, J 2017, 'International comparison of observation-specific spatial buffers: maximizing the ability to estimate physical activity', International Journal of Health Geographics, bind 16, 4. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12942-017-0077-9

International comparison of observation-specific spatial buffers : maximizing the ability to estimate physical activity. / Frank, Lawrence D; Fox, Eric H; Ulmer, Jared M; Chapman, James E; Kershaw, Suzanne E; Sallis, James F; Conway, Terry L; Cerin, Ester; Cain, Kelli L; Adams, Marc A; Radford-Smith, Graham; Hinckson, Erica; Mavoa, Suzanne; Christiansen, Lars B; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Lopes, Adalberto A S; Schipperijn, Jasper.

I: International Journal of Health Geographics, Bind 16, 4, 2017.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - International comparison of observation-specific spatial buffers

T2 - maximizing the ability to estimate physical activity

AU - Frank, Lawrence D

AU - Fox, Eric H

AU - Ulmer, Jared M

AU - Chapman, James E

AU - Kershaw, Suzanne E

AU - Sallis, James F

AU - Conway, Terry L

AU - Cerin, Ester

AU - Cain, Kelli L

AU - Adams, Marc A

AU - Radford-Smith, Graham

AU - Hinckson, Erica

AU - Mavoa, Suzanne

AU - Christiansen, Lars B

AU - Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira

AU - Lopes, Adalberto A S

AU - Schipperijn, Jasper

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - BACKGROUND: Advancements in geographic information systems over the past two decades have increased the specificity by which an individual's neighborhood environment may be spatially defined for physical activity and health research. This study investigated how different types of street network buffering methods compared in measuring a set of commonly used built environment measures (BEMs) and tested their performance on associations with physical activity outcomes.METHODS: An internationally-developed set of objective BEMs using three different spatial buffering techniques were used to evaluate the relative differences in resulting explanatory power on self-reported physical activity outcomes. BEMs were developed in five countries using 'sausage,' 'detailed-trimmed,' and 'detailed,' network buffers at a distance of 1 km around participant household addresses (n = 5883).RESULTS: BEM values were significantly different (p < 0.05) for 96% of sausage versus detailed-trimmed buffer comparisons and 89% of sausage versus detailed network buffer comparisons. Results showed that BEM coefficients in physical activity models did not differ significantly across buffering methods, and in most cases BEM associations with physical activity outcomes had the same level of statistical significance across buffer types. However, BEM coefficients differed in significance for 9% of the sausage versus detailed models, which may warrant further investigation.CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study inform the selection of spatial buffering methods to estimate physical activity outcomes using an internationally consistent set of BEMs. Using three different network-based buffering methods, the findings indicate significant variation among BEM values, however associations with physical activity outcomes were similar across each buffering technique. The study advances knowledge by presenting consistently assessed relationships between three different network buffer types and utilitarian travel, sedentary behavior, and leisure-oriented physical activity outcomes.

AB - BACKGROUND: Advancements in geographic information systems over the past two decades have increased the specificity by which an individual's neighborhood environment may be spatially defined for physical activity and health research. This study investigated how different types of street network buffering methods compared in measuring a set of commonly used built environment measures (BEMs) and tested their performance on associations with physical activity outcomes.METHODS: An internationally-developed set of objective BEMs using three different spatial buffering techniques were used to evaluate the relative differences in resulting explanatory power on self-reported physical activity outcomes. BEMs were developed in five countries using 'sausage,' 'detailed-trimmed,' and 'detailed,' network buffers at a distance of 1 km around participant household addresses (n = 5883).RESULTS: BEM values were significantly different (p < 0.05) for 96% of sausage versus detailed-trimmed buffer comparisons and 89% of sausage versus detailed network buffer comparisons. Results showed that BEM coefficients in physical activity models did not differ significantly across buffering methods, and in most cases BEM associations with physical activity outcomes had the same level of statistical significance across buffer types. However, BEM coefficients differed in significance for 9% of the sausage versus detailed models, which may warrant further investigation.CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study inform the selection of spatial buffering methods to estimate physical activity outcomes using an internationally consistent set of BEMs. Using three different network-based buffering methods, the findings indicate significant variation among BEM values, however associations with physical activity outcomes were similar across each buffering technique. The study advances knowledge by presenting consistently assessed relationships between three different network buffer types and utilitarian travel, sedentary behavior, and leisure-oriented physical activity outcomes.

U2 - 10.1186/s12942-017-0077-9

DO - 10.1186/s12942-017-0077-9

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

JO - International Journal of Health Geographics

JF - International Journal of Health Geographics

SN - 1476-072X

M1 - 4

ER -