Intergenerational Justice Perceptions and the Role of Welfare Regimes

A Comparative Analysis of University Students

Clara Sabbagh, Pieter Vanhuysse

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article studies perceptions of intergenerational justice among 2,075 undergraduate university students from eight democracies spanning four different models, or 'worlds,' of welfare. We examine two different, though interrelated, aspects of intergenerational justice: (1) whether, and how, different welfare regimes structure young people's perceptions of the justness of public resources transfers from young to elderly age-groups and (2) the perceived relative contributions and rewards of various age-groups. Thus we inquire about both the perceived support in principle and about the perceived justness of actual outcomes of resource transfers between age-groups. We find that support of transfers from the young to the old is higher in social-democratic and conservative welfare regimes than in liberal and radical regimes. Support of resource transfers also correlates positively with a 'welfare-statist' ideological frame (the endorsement of egalitarian redistribution and broad state responsibility for welfare provision and the attribution of social inequality to external causes), and negatively with a 'market-based' frame (individualism, a work ethic, and internal attribution). Regarding actual outcomes, the following ordering of age-groups obtained regarding perceived contributions to society: Adults > youth > elderly. Regarding perceived rewards from society, the ranking was: Adults > elderly >= youth. The one exception in both cases was formed by the conservative regime, which stands out by its straightforward profile: the younger the age-group, the lower its perceived rewards, and the higher its perceived contributions.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAdministration & Society
Vol/bind42
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)638-667
ISSN0095-3997
StatusUdgivet - 2010

Fingeraftryk

age group
welfare
justice
reward
student
attribution
resources
regime
social inequality
individualism
redistribution
ranking
moral philosophy
Age groups
Comparative analysis
Intergenerational justice
Welfare regimes
democracy
responsibility
cause

Citer dette

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Intergenerational Justice Perceptions and the Role of Welfare Regimes : A Comparative Analysis of University Students. / Sabbagh, Clara; Vanhuysse, Pieter.

I: Administration & Society, Bind 42, Nr. 6, 2010, s. 638-667.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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N2 - This article studies perceptions of intergenerational justice among 2,075 undergraduate university students from eight democracies spanning four different models, or 'worlds,' of welfare. We examine two different, though interrelated, aspects of intergenerational justice: (1) whether, and how, different welfare regimes structure young people's perceptions of the justness of public resources transfers from young to elderly age-groups and (2) the perceived relative contributions and rewards of various age-groups. Thus we inquire about both the perceived support in principle and about the perceived justness of actual outcomes of resource transfers between age-groups. We find that support of transfers from the young to the old is higher in social-democratic and conservative welfare regimes than in liberal and radical regimes. Support of resource transfers also correlates positively with a 'welfare-statist' ideological frame (the endorsement of egalitarian redistribution and broad state responsibility for welfare provision and the attribution of social inequality to external causes), and negatively with a 'market-based' frame (individualism, a work ethic, and internal attribution). Regarding actual outcomes, the following ordering of age-groups obtained regarding perceived contributions to society: Adults > youth > elderly. Regarding perceived rewards from society, the ranking was: Adults > elderly >= youth. The one exception in both cases was formed by the conservative regime, which stands out by its straightforward profile: the younger the age-group, the lower its perceived rewards, and the higher its perceived contributions.

AB - This article studies perceptions of intergenerational justice among 2,075 undergraduate university students from eight democracies spanning four different models, or 'worlds,' of welfare. We examine two different, though interrelated, aspects of intergenerational justice: (1) whether, and how, different welfare regimes structure young people's perceptions of the justness of public resources transfers from young to elderly age-groups and (2) the perceived relative contributions and rewards of various age-groups. Thus we inquire about both the perceived support in principle and about the perceived justness of actual outcomes of resource transfers between age-groups. We find that support of transfers from the young to the old is higher in social-democratic and conservative welfare regimes than in liberal and radical regimes. Support of resource transfers also correlates positively with a 'welfare-statist' ideological frame (the endorsement of egalitarian redistribution and broad state responsibility for welfare provision and the attribution of social inequality to external causes), and negatively with a 'market-based' frame (individualism, a work ethic, and internal attribution). Regarding actual outcomes, the following ordering of age-groups obtained regarding perceived contributions to society: Adults > youth > elderly. Regarding perceived rewards from society, the ranking was: Adults > elderly >= youth. The one exception in both cases was formed by the conservative regime, which stands out by its straightforward profile: the younger the age-group, the lower its perceived rewards, and the higher its perceived contributions.

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