Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk

Ele Ferrannini, Beverley Balkau, Simon W Coppack, Jacqueline M Dekker, Andrea Mari, John Nolan, Mark Walker, Andrea Natali, Henning Beck-Nielsen, RISC Investigators

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Aug
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Vol/bind92
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)2885-92
Antal sider7
ISSN0021-972X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. aug. 2007

Fingeraftryk

Insulin Resistance
Insulin
Body Mass Index
Abdominal Obesity
HDL Cholesterol
Statistical Factor Analysis
Glucose Clamp Technique
Glucose Tolerance Test
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
LDL Cholesterol
Fasting
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fats
Serum
Research

Citer dette

Ferrannini, E., Balkau, B., Coppack, S. W., Dekker, J. M., Mari, A., Nolan, J., ... Investigators, RISC. (2007). Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 92(8), 2885-92. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2007-0334
Ferrannini, Ele ; Balkau, Beverley ; Coppack, Simon W ; Dekker, Jacqueline M ; Mari, Andrea ; Nolan, John ; Walker, Mark ; Natali, Andrea ; Beck-Nielsen, Henning ; Investigators, RISC. / Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk. I: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2007 ; Bind 92, Nr. 8. s. 2885-92.
@article{4df1ce20cb5a11dc8674000ea68e967b,
title = "Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk",
abstract = "CONTEXT: Insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, especially abdominal obesity, are regarded as central pathophysiological features of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), but their relative roles remain undefined. Moreover, the differential impact of IR viz. insulin response has not been evaluated. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to dissect out the impact of obesity, abdominal obesity, and IR/insulin response on CVRF. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was conducted at 21 research centers in Europe. SUBJECTS: The study included a cohort of 1308 nondiabetic subjects [718 women and 590 men, age 30-60 yr, body mass index (BMI) 17-44 kg.m(-2)]. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured IR (by a standardized euglycemic insulin clamp), waist girth, insulin response to an oral glucose tolerance test, and major CVRF, and analyzed their associations by multivariate models and factor analysis. RESULTS: BMI was positively related to all CVRFs. Waist circumference was related to higher blood pressure and serum triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, IR to reduced glucose tolerance, higher free fatty acids, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and insulin response to higher heart rate, blood pressure and fasting glucose, and the same dyslipidemic profile as IR (P < or = 0.05 for all). By factor analysis, three main factors (related to IR, age, and fatness, respectively) appeared to underlie this pattern of associations. Each of BMI, waist girth, IR, and insulin response was independently associated with total CVRF load (all P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: When IR, fat mass and distribution, and insulin response are measured simultaneously in a large cohort, no one factor stands out as the sole driving force of the CVRF cluster, each being associated with one or more physiological pathways according to known cause-effect relationships",
keywords = "Abdominal Fat, Adult, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Female, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glucose Tolerance Test, Heart Rate, Humans, Hyperinsulinism, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Lipids, Male, Metabolic Diseases, Middle Aged, Obesity, Physical Examination, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Sex Characteristics, Waist-Hip Ratio",
author = "Ele Ferrannini and Beverley Balkau and Coppack, {Simon W} and Dekker, {Jacqueline M} and Andrea Mari and John Nolan and Mark Walker and Andrea Natali and Henning Beck-Nielsen and RISC Investigators",
year = "2007",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1210/jc.2007-0334",
language = "English",
volume = "92",
pages = "2885--92",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "8",

}

Ferrannini, E, Balkau, B, Coppack, SW, Dekker, JM, Mari, A, Nolan, J, Walker, M, Natali, A, Beck-Nielsen, H & Investigators, RISC 2007, 'Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk', Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, bind 92, nr. 8, s. 2885-92. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2007-0334

Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk. / Ferrannini, Ele; Balkau, Beverley; Coppack, Simon W; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Mari, Andrea; Nolan, John; Walker, Mark; Natali, Andrea; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Investigators, RISC.

I: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Bind 92, Nr. 8, 01.08.2007, s. 2885-92.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insulin resistance, insulin response, and obesity as indicators of metabolic risk

AU - Ferrannini, Ele

AU - Balkau, Beverley

AU - Coppack, Simon W

AU - Dekker, Jacqueline M

AU - Mari, Andrea

AU - Nolan, John

AU - Walker, Mark

AU - Natali, Andrea

AU - Beck-Nielsen, Henning

AU - Investigators, RISC

PY - 2007/8/1

Y1 - 2007/8/1

N2 - CONTEXT: Insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, especially abdominal obesity, are regarded as central pathophysiological features of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), but their relative roles remain undefined. Moreover, the differential impact of IR viz. insulin response has not been evaluated. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to dissect out the impact of obesity, abdominal obesity, and IR/insulin response on CVRF. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was conducted at 21 research centers in Europe. SUBJECTS: The study included a cohort of 1308 nondiabetic subjects [718 women and 590 men, age 30-60 yr, body mass index (BMI) 17-44 kg.m(-2)]. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured IR (by a standardized euglycemic insulin clamp), waist girth, insulin response to an oral glucose tolerance test, and major CVRF, and analyzed their associations by multivariate models and factor analysis. RESULTS: BMI was positively related to all CVRFs. Waist circumference was related to higher blood pressure and serum triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, IR to reduced glucose tolerance, higher free fatty acids, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and insulin response to higher heart rate, blood pressure and fasting glucose, and the same dyslipidemic profile as IR (P < or = 0.05 for all). By factor analysis, three main factors (related to IR, age, and fatness, respectively) appeared to underlie this pattern of associations. Each of BMI, waist girth, IR, and insulin response was independently associated with total CVRF load (all P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: When IR, fat mass and distribution, and insulin response are measured simultaneously in a large cohort, no one factor stands out as the sole driving force of the CVRF cluster, each being associated with one or more physiological pathways according to known cause-effect relationships

AB - CONTEXT: Insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, especially abdominal obesity, are regarded as central pathophysiological features of a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), but their relative roles remain undefined. Moreover, the differential impact of IR viz. insulin response has not been evaluated. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to dissect out the impact of obesity, abdominal obesity, and IR/insulin response on CVRF. DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was conducted at 21 research centers in Europe. SUBJECTS: The study included a cohort of 1308 nondiabetic subjects [718 women and 590 men, age 30-60 yr, body mass index (BMI) 17-44 kg.m(-2)]. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured IR (by a standardized euglycemic insulin clamp), waist girth, insulin response to an oral glucose tolerance test, and major CVRF, and analyzed their associations by multivariate models and factor analysis. RESULTS: BMI was positively related to all CVRFs. Waist circumference was related to higher blood pressure and serum triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, IR to reduced glucose tolerance, higher free fatty acids, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and insulin response to higher heart rate, blood pressure and fasting glucose, and the same dyslipidemic profile as IR (P < or = 0.05 for all). By factor analysis, three main factors (related to IR, age, and fatness, respectively) appeared to underlie this pattern of associations. Each of BMI, waist girth, IR, and insulin response was independently associated with total CVRF load (all P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: When IR, fat mass and distribution, and insulin response are measured simultaneously in a large cohort, no one factor stands out as the sole driving force of the CVRF cluster, each being associated with one or more physiological pathways according to known cause-effect relationships

KW - Abdominal Fat

KW - Adult

KW - Blood Pressure

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Data Interpretation, Statistical

KW - Female

KW - Glucose Clamp Technique

KW - Glucose Tolerance Test

KW - Heart Rate

KW - Humans

KW - Hyperinsulinism

KW - Insulin

KW - Insulin Resistance

KW - Lipids

KW - Male

KW - Metabolic Diseases

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Obesity

KW - Physical Examination

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Sex Characteristics

KW - Waist-Hip Ratio

U2 - 10.1210/jc.2007-0334

DO - 10.1210/jc.2007-0334

M3 - Journal article

VL - 92

SP - 2885

EP - 2892

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 8

ER -