Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts

Nicolai A. Lund-Blix*, Stine Dydensborg Sander, Ketil Størdal, Anne Marie Nybo Andersen, Kjersti S. Rønningen, Geir Joner, Torild Skrivarhaug, Pål R Njølstad, Steffen Husby, Lars C. Stene

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Objective: Our aimwas to study the relation between the duration of full and any breastfeeding and risk of type 1 diabetes. Research Design and Methods: We included two population-based cohorts of children followed from birth (1996-2009) to 2014 (Denmark) or 2015 (Norway).We analyzed data froma total of 155,392 children participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). Parents reported infant dietary practices when their child was 6 and 18months old. The outcomewas clinical type 1 diabetes, ascertained fromnationwide childhood diabetes registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression. Results: Type 1 diabetes was identified in 504 children during follow-up, and the incidence of type 1 diabetes per 100,000 person-yearswas 30.5 in the Norwegian cohort and 23.5 in theDanish cohort. Childrenwhowere never breastfed had a twofold increased risk of type 1 diabetes compared with those who were breastfed (HR 2.29 [95% CI 1.14-4.61] for no breastfeeding vs. any breastfeeding for ≥12 months). Among those who were breastfed, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes was independent of duration of both full breastfeeding (HR per month 0.99 [95% CI 0.97-1.01]) and any breastfeeding (0.97 [0.92-1.03]). Conclusions: Suggestive evidence supports the contention that breastfeeding reduces the risk of type 1 diabetes. Among those who were breastfed, however, no evidence indicated that prolonging full or any breastfeeding was associatedwith a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDiabetes Care
Vol/bind40
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)920-927
ISSN0149-5992
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Incidence
Denmark
Norway
Registries
Cohort Studies
Research Design
Parents
Mothers
Population

Citer dette

Lund-Blix, N. A., Sander, S. D., Størdal, K., Nybo Andersen, A. M., Rønningen, K. S., Joner, G., ... Stene, L. C. (2017). Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts. Diabetes Care, 40(7), 920-927. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc17-0016
Lund-Blix, Nicolai A. ; Sander, Stine Dydensborg ; Størdal, Ketil ; Nybo Andersen, Anne Marie ; Rønningen, Kjersti S. ; Joner, Geir ; Skrivarhaug, Torild ; Njølstad, Pål R ; Husby, Steffen ; Stene, Lars C. / Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts. I: Diabetes Care. 2017 ; Bind 40, Nr. 7. s. 920-927.
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title = "Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts",
abstract = "Objective: Our aimwas to study the relation between the duration of full and any breastfeeding and risk of type 1 diabetes. Research Design and Methods: We included two population-based cohorts of children followed from birth (1996-2009) to 2014 (Denmark) or 2015 (Norway).We analyzed data froma total of 155,392 children participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). Parents reported infant dietary practices when their child was 6 and 18months old. The outcomewas clinical type 1 diabetes, ascertained fromnationwide childhood diabetes registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression. Results: Type 1 diabetes was identified in 504 children during follow-up, and the incidence of type 1 diabetes per 100,000 person-yearswas 30.5 in the Norwegian cohort and 23.5 in theDanish cohort. Childrenwhowere never breastfed had a twofold increased risk of type 1 diabetes compared with those who were breastfed (HR 2.29 [95{\%} CI 1.14-4.61] for no breastfeeding vs. any breastfeeding for ≥12 months). Among those who were breastfed, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes was independent of duration of both full breastfeeding (HR per month 0.99 [95{\%} CI 0.97-1.01]) and any breastfeeding (0.97 [0.92-1.03]). Conclusions: Suggestive evidence supports the contention that breastfeeding reduces the risk of type 1 diabetes. Among those who were breastfed, however, no evidence indicated that prolonging full or any breastfeeding was associatedwith a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes.",
author = "Lund-Blix, {Nicolai A.} and Sander, {Stine Dydensborg} and Ketil St{\o}rdal and {Nybo Andersen}, {Anne Marie} and R{\o}nningen, {Kjersti S.} and Geir Joner and Torild Skrivarhaug and Nj{\o}lstad, {P{\aa}l R} and Steffen Husby and Stene, {Lars C.}",
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language = "English",
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Lund-Blix, NA, Sander, SD, Størdal, K, Nybo Andersen, AM, Rønningen, KS, Joner, G, Skrivarhaug, T, Njølstad, PR, Husby, S & Stene, LC 2017, 'Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts', Diabetes Care, bind 40, nr. 7, s. 920-927. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc17-0016

Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts. / Lund-Blix, Nicolai A.; Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Størdal, Ketil ; Nybo Andersen, Anne Marie; Rønningen, Kjersti S.; Joner, Geir; Skrivarhaug, Torild; Njølstad, Pål R; Husby, Steffen; Stene, Lars C.

I: Diabetes Care, Bind 40, Nr. 7, 2017, s. 920-927.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts

AU - Lund-Blix, Nicolai A.

AU - Sander, Stine Dydensborg

AU - Størdal, Ketil

AU - Nybo Andersen, Anne Marie

AU - Rønningen, Kjersti S.

AU - Joner, Geir

AU - Skrivarhaug, Torild

AU - Njølstad, Pål R

AU - Husby, Steffen

AU - Stene, Lars C.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Objective: Our aimwas to study the relation between the duration of full and any breastfeeding and risk of type 1 diabetes. Research Design and Methods: We included two population-based cohorts of children followed from birth (1996-2009) to 2014 (Denmark) or 2015 (Norway).We analyzed data froma total of 155,392 children participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). Parents reported infant dietary practices when their child was 6 and 18months old. The outcomewas clinical type 1 diabetes, ascertained fromnationwide childhood diabetes registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression. Results: Type 1 diabetes was identified in 504 children during follow-up, and the incidence of type 1 diabetes per 100,000 person-yearswas 30.5 in the Norwegian cohort and 23.5 in theDanish cohort. Childrenwhowere never breastfed had a twofold increased risk of type 1 diabetes compared with those who were breastfed (HR 2.29 [95% CI 1.14-4.61] for no breastfeeding vs. any breastfeeding for ≥12 months). Among those who were breastfed, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes was independent of duration of both full breastfeeding (HR per month 0.99 [95% CI 0.97-1.01]) and any breastfeeding (0.97 [0.92-1.03]). Conclusions: Suggestive evidence supports the contention that breastfeeding reduces the risk of type 1 diabetes. Among those who were breastfed, however, no evidence indicated that prolonging full or any breastfeeding was associatedwith a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes.

AB - Objective: Our aimwas to study the relation between the duration of full and any breastfeeding and risk of type 1 diabetes. Research Design and Methods: We included two population-based cohorts of children followed from birth (1996-2009) to 2014 (Denmark) or 2015 (Norway).We analyzed data froma total of 155,392 children participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC). Parents reported infant dietary practices when their child was 6 and 18months old. The outcomewas clinical type 1 diabetes, ascertained fromnationwide childhood diabetes registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox regression. Results: Type 1 diabetes was identified in 504 children during follow-up, and the incidence of type 1 diabetes per 100,000 person-yearswas 30.5 in the Norwegian cohort and 23.5 in theDanish cohort. Childrenwhowere never breastfed had a twofold increased risk of type 1 diabetes compared with those who were breastfed (HR 2.29 [95% CI 1.14-4.61] for no breastfeeding vs. any breastfeeding for ≥12 months). Among those who were breastfed, however, the incidence of type 1 diabetes was independent of duration of both full breastfeeding (HR per month 0.99 [95% CI 0.97-1.01]) and any breastfeeding (0.97 [0.92-1.03]). Conclusions: Suggestive evidence supports the contention that breastfeeding reduces the risk of type 1 diabetes. Among those who were breastfed, however, no evidence indicated that prolonging full or any breastfeeding was associatedwith a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes.

U2 - 10.2337/dc17-0016

DO - 10.2337/dc17-0016

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28487451

AN - SCOPUS:85021157055

VL - 40

SP - 920

EP - 927

JO - Diabetes Care

JF - Diabetes Care

SN - 0149-5992

IS - 7

ER -

Lund-Blix NA, Sander SD, Størdal K, Nybo Andersen AM, Rønningen KS, Joner G et al. Infant feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes in two large scandinavian birth cohorts. Diabetes Care. 2017;40(7):920-927. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc17-0016