Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

Bidragets oversatte titel: Indtag af sodavand ved seks og ni-årsalderen og associationen med BMI tre og syv år senere - Et opfølgningsstudie baseret på The Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

Britt Wang Jensen, Birgit Marie Nielsen, Ida Husby, Anna Bugge, Bianca El-Naaman Hermansen, Lars Bo Andersen, Ellen Trolle, Berit Lilienthal Heitmann

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

Resumé

Introduction: The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is one of the few dietary components that have been associated with the development of obesity. However, most previous studies have been based on children or adolescents aged 8 years or more. Method: The study was based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS), a 7- year longitudinal study initiated in 2001 among preschool children aged 6 years. Weight and height were measured at enrolment and 3 and 7 years later. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed at age 6 and 9 years using 4-days accelerometer and a 7-days pre-printed food record. Analyses were conducted using the mixed model approach for repeated measurements and were adjusted for gender, puberty, parental BMI, municipality, school, baseline BMI, SES and physical activity. Results: 154 children, 68 boys and 86 girls were included in the analyses. Mean intake of soft drinks was 0.14 l/d at age 6 and 0.12 l/d at age 9 (difference p=0.08). No associations were found between intake of soft drink at age 6 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.8; p=0.91), or intake at age 9 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.3; p= 0.80). Neither was the change in intake of soft drinks from age 6 to 9 associated with BMI at age 13 (b:-0.6; p= 0.46). Conclusion: In young children aged 6 years the intake of soft drinks did not seem to be associated with BMI at age 13. Neither was the change in intake or intake at age 9.1.Conflicts of interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose 2.Funding: Research relating to this abstract was founded by TrygFonden, The Danish Heart Foundation and University of Southern Denmark
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2011
Antal sider1
StatusUdgivet - 2011
BegivenhedEuropean Congress on Obesity 2011 - Istanbul, Tyrkiet
Varighed: 25. maj 201128. maj 2011

Konference

KonferenceEuropean Congress on Obesity 2011
LandTyrkiet
ByIstanbul
Periode25/05/201128/05/2011

Citer dette

Jensen, B. W., Nielsen, B. M., Husby, I., Bugge, A., Hermansen, B. E-N., Andersen, L. B., ... Heitmann, B. L. (2011). Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS). Abstract fra European Congress on Obesity 2011, Istanbul, Tyrkiet.
Jensen, Britt Wang ; Nielsen, Birgit Marie ; Husby, Ida ; Bugge, Anna ; Hermansen, Bianca El-Naaman ; Andersen, Lars Bo ; Trolle, Ellen ; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal. / Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS). Abstract fra European Congress on Obesity 2011, Istanbul, Tyrkiet.1 s.
@conference{a28ead2b3b5b4825b8b8944523d6ce24,
title = "Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)",
abstract = "Introduction: The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is one of the few dietary components that have been associated with the development of obesity. However, most previous studies have been based on children or adolescents aged 8 years or more. Method: The study was based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS), a 7- year longitudinal study initiated in 2001 among preschool children aged 6 years. Weight and height were measured at enrolment and 3 and 7 years later. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed at age 6 and 9 years using 4-days accelerometer and a 7-days pre-printed food record. Analyses were conducted using the mixed model approach for repeated measurements and were adjusted for gender, puberty, parental BMI, municipality, school, baseline BMI, SES and physical activity. Results: 154 children, 68 boys and 86 girls were included in the analyses. Mean intake of soft drinks was 0.14 l/d at age 6 and 0.12 l/d at age 9 (difference p=0.08). No associations were found between intake of soft drink at age 6 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.8; p=0.91), or intake at age 9 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.3; p= 0.80). Neither was the change in intake of soft drinks from age 6 to 9 associated with BMI at age 13 (b:-0.6; p= 0.46). Conclusion: In young children aged 6 years the intake of soft drinks did not seem to be associated with BMI at age 13. Neither was the change in intake or intake at age 9.1.Conflicts of interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose 2.Funding: Research relating to this abstract was founded by TrygFonden, The Danish Heart Foundation and University of Southern Denmark",
author = "Jensen, {Britt Wang} and Nielsen, {Birgit Marie} and Ida Husby and Anna Bugge and Hermansen, {Bianca El-Naaman} and Andersen, {Lars Bo} and Ellen Trolle and Heitmann, {Berit Lilienthal}",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 25-05-2011 Through 28-05-2011",

}

Jensen, BW, Nielsen, BM, Husby, I, Bugge, A, Hermansen, BE-N, Andersen, LB, Trolle, E & Heitmann, BL 2011, 'Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)' European Congress on Obesity 2011, Istanbul, Tyrkiet, 25/05/2011 - 28/05/2011, .

Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS). / Jensen, Britt Wang; Nielsen, Birgit Marie; Husby, Ida; Bugge, Anna; Hermansen, Bianca El-Naaman; Andersen, Lars Bo; Trolle, Ellen; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal.

2011. Abstract fra European Congress on Obesity 2011, Istanbul, Tyrkiet.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskning

TY - ABST

T1 - Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS)

AU - Jensen, Britt Wang

AU - Nielsen, Birgit Marie

AU - Husby, Ida

AU - Bugge, Anna

AU - Hermansen, Bianca El-Naaman

AU - Andersen, Lars Bo

AU - Trolle, Ellen

AU - Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Introduction: The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is one of the few dietary components that have been associated with the development of obesity. However, most previous studies have been based on children or adolescents aged 8 years or more. Method: The study was based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS), a 7- year longitudinal study initiated in 2001 among preschool children aged 6 years. Weight and height were measured at enrolment and 3 and 7 years later. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed at age 6 and 9 years using 4-days accelerometer and a 7-days pre-printed food record. Analyses were conducted using the mixed model approach for repeated measurements and were adjusted for gender, puberty, parental BMI, municipality, school, baseline BMI, SES and physical activity. Results: 154 children, 68 boys and 86 girls were included in the analyses. Mean intake of soft drinks was 0.14 l/d at age 6 and 0.12 l/d at age 9 (difference p=0.08). No associations were found between intake of soft drink at age 6 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.8; p=0.91), or intake at age 9 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.3; p= 0.80). Neither was the change in intake of soft drinks from age 6 to 9 associated with BMI at age 13 (b:-0.6; p= 0.46). Conclusion: In young children aged 6 years the intake of soft drinks did not seem to be associated with BMI at age 13. Neither was the change in intake or intake at age 9.1.Conflicts of interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose 2.Funding: Research relating to this abstract was founded by TrygFonden, The Danish Heart Foundation and University of Southern Denmark

AB - Introduction: The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages is one of the few dietary components that have been associated with the development of obesity. However, most previous studies have been based on children or adolescents aged 8 years or more. Method: The study was based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS), a 7- year longitudinal study initiated in 2001 among preschool children aged 6 years. Weight and height were measured at enrolment and 3 and 7 years later. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed at age 6 and 9 years using 4-days accelerometer and a 7-days pre-printed food record. Analyses were conducted using the mixed model approach for repeated measurements and were adjusted for gender, puberty, parental BMI, municipality, school, baseline BMI, SES and physical activity. Results: 154 children, 68 boys and 86 girls were included in the analyses. Mean intake of soft drinks was 0.14 l/d at age 6 and 0.12 l/d at age 9 (difference p=0.08). No associations were found between intake of soft drink at age 6 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.8; p=0.91), or intake at age 9 and BMI at age 13 (b:-0.3; p= 0.80). Neither was the change in intake of soft drinks from age 6 to 9 associated with BMI at age 13 (b:-0.6; p= 0.46). Conclusion: In young children aged 6 years the intake of soft drinks did not seem to be associated with BMI at age 13. Neither was the change in intake or intake at age 9.1.Conflicts of interest: The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose 2.Funding: Research relating to this abstract was founded by TrygFonden, The Danish Heart Foundation and University of Southern Denmark

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -

Jensen BW, Nielsen BM, Husby I, Bugge A, Hermansen BE-N, Andersen LB et al. Soft drink intake at age six and nine and the association with BMI three and seven years later - A follow-up study based on the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS). 2011. Abstract fra European Congress on Obesity 2011, Istanbul, Tyrkiet.