Increases in Use and Activity Due to Urban Renewal

Effect of a Natural Experiment

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Introduction
Urban green space and other recreational facilities are associated with physical activity. For adolescents living in multistory housing, public outdoor spaces that support physical activity may play an important role in activity promotion strategies. However, stronger evidence for a relation between the built environment and adolescent physical activity is scarce.

Design
A natural experiment with a pre-experimental design was used with data collected in 2010 and 2012 before and after an urban renewal. Data were analyzed in 2016.

Setting/participants
Adolescents aged 11–16 years spending a minimum of 10 minutes daily within a 400-m buffer of the renewal district were included in the analyses, resulting in 354 adolescents at baseline and 319 post-renewal.

Intervention
A multicomponent urban renewal project of approximately 35 million euros in a disadvantaged neighborhood in the capital of Denmark occurred between 2010 and 2012.

Main outcome measures
The main outcomes were changes in time spent and physical activity within the area among adolescents, measured by accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X) and GPS devices (Qstarz BT-Q1000XT).

Results
Time spent in the area was greater in 2012 than 2010 with an additional 24.6 minutes per day (p=0.017). Of this time, 7.8 minutes were spent in light and 4.5 minutes in moderate to vigorous physical activity.

Conclusions
The present study indicates that a multicomponent urban renewal strategy in a disadvantaged district has the potential to increase time spent and physical activity in the district for adolescents living in or close to the district.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Vol/bind53
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)e81-e87
ISSN0749-3797
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Fingeraftryk

Urban Renewal
Exercise
Vulnerable Populations
Public Housing
Denmark
Research Design
Equipment and Supplies

Citer dette

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title = "Increases in Use and Activity Due to Urban Renewal: Effect of a Natural Experiment",
abstract = "IntroductionUrban green space and other recreational facilities are associated with physical activity. For adolescents living in multistory housing, public outdoor spaces that support physical activity may play an important role in activity promotion strategies. However, stronger evidence for a relation between the built environment and adolescent physical activity is scarce.DesignA natural experiment with a pre-experimental design was used with data collected in 2010 and 2012 before and after an urban renewal. Data were analyzed in 2016.Setting/participantsAdolescents aged 11–16 years spending a minimum of 10 minutes daily within a 400-m buffer of the renewal district were included in the analyses, resulting in 354 adolescents at baseline and 319 post-renewal.InterventionA multicomponent urban renewal project of approximately 35 million euros in a disadvantaged neighborhood in the capital of Denmark occurred between 2010 and 2012.Main outcome measuresThe main outcomes were changes in time spent and physical activity within the area among adolescents, measured by accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X) and GPS devices (Qstarz BT-Q1000XT).ResultsTime spent in the area was greater in 2012 than 2010 with an additional 24.6 minutes per day (p=0.017). Of this time, 7.8 minutes were spent in light and 4.5 minutes in moderate to vigorous physical activity.ConclusionsThe present study indicates that a multicomponent urban renewal strategy in a disadvantaged district has the potential to increase time spent and physical activity in the district for adolescents living in or close to the district.",
author = "Andersen, {Henriette Bondo} and Christiansen, {Lars Breum} and Klinker, {Charlotte Demant} and Ersb{\o}ll, {Annette Kj{\ae}r} and Jens Troelsen and Jacqueline Kerr and Jasper Schipperijn",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Increases in Use and Activity Due to Urban Renewal

T2 - Effect of a Natural Experiment

AU - Andersen, Henriette Bondo

AU - Christiansen, Lars Breum

AU - Klinker, Charlotte Demant

AU - Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

AU - Troelsen, Jens

AU - Kerr, Jacqueline

AU - Schipperijn, Jasper

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - IntroductionUrban green space and other recreational facilities are associated with physical activity. For adolescents living in multistory housing, public outdoor spaces that support physical activity may play an important role in activity promotion strategies. However, stronger evidence for a relation between the built environment and adolescent physical activity is scarce.DesignA natural experiment with a pre-experimental design was used with data collected in 2010 and 2012 before and after an urban renewal. Data were analyzed in 2016.Setting/participantsAdolescents aged 11–16 years spending a minimum of 10 minutes daily within a 400-m buffer of the renewal district were included in the analyses, resulting in 354 adolescents at baseline and 319 post-renewal.InterventionA multicomponent urban renewal project of approximately 35 million euros in a disadvantaged neighborhood in the capital of Denmark occurred between 2010 and 2012.Main outcome measuresThe main outcomes were changes in time spent and physical activity within the area among adolescents, measured by accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X) and GPS devices (Qstarz BT-Q1000XT).ResultsTime spent in the area was greater in 2012 than 2010 with an additional 24.6 minutes per day (p=0.017). Of this time, 7.8 minutes were spent in light and 4.5 minutes in moderate to vigorous physical activity.ConclusionsThe present study indicates that a multicomponent urban renewal strategy in a disadvantaged district has the potential to increase time spent and physical activity in the district for adolescents living in or close to the district.

AB - IntroductionUrban green space and other recreational facilities are associated with physical activity. For adolescents living in multistory housing, public outdoor spaces that support physical activity may play an important role in activity promotion strategies. However, stronger evidence for a relation between the built environment and adolescent physical activity is scarce.DesignA natural experiment with a pre-experimental design was used with data collected in 2010 and 2012 before and after an urban renewal. Data were analyzed in 2016.Setting/participantsAdolescents aged 11–16 years spending a minimum of 10 minutes daily within a 400-m buffer of the renewal district were included in the analyses, resulting in 354 adolescents at baseline and 319 post-renewal.InterventionA multicomponent urban renewal project of approximately 35 million euros in a disadvantaged neighborhood in the capital of Denmark occurred between 2010 and 2012.Main outcome measuresThe main outcomes were changes in time spent and physical activity within the area among adolescents, measured by accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X) and GPS devices (Qstarz BT-Q1000XT).ResultsTime spent in the area was greater in 2012 than 2010 with an additional 24.6 minutes per day (p=0.017). Of this time, 7.8 minutes were spent in light and 4.5 minutes in moderate to vigorous physical activity.ConclusionsThe present study indicates that a multicomponent urban renewal strategy in a disadvantaged district has the potential to increase time spent and physical activity in the district for adolescents living in or close to the district.

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.03.010

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.03.010

M3 - Journal article

VL - 53

SP - e81-e87

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

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