Increased Risk of Postpartum Infections After Caesarian and Vaginal Delivery in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study

Sonia Friedman, Floor Dijkstra Zegers, Line Riis Jølving, Jan Nielsen, Bente Mertz Nørgård

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Abstrakt

BACKGROUND: There is lack of knowledge concerning postpartum infections in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim is to determine the 30-day postpartum infectious complications in women with and without IBD who have a caesarian section, normal vaginal delivery, or assisted vaginal delivery.

METHODS: We used Danish national registries to establish a study population of liveborn, singleton births from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2015. We examined 30-day postpartum maternal infectious complications in women with and without IBD, according to the mode of delivery. Statistical models were adjusted for multiple confounders.

RESULTS: In all, 3255 women with and 207 608 without IBD had a caesarian section. Within 30 days postpartum, 4.5% of women with and 3.7% without IBD had an infectious complication. Increased infectious complications included overall infections (adjusted OR [aOR], 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-2.47), infections of the gastrointestinal tract (aOR, 4.36, 95% CI 2.34-8.10), and infections of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (aOR, 4.45; 95% CI, 2.30-8.50). Other puerperal infections, urological and gynecological, and other infections were increased, although not significantly. For vaginal deliveries, 1.6% of 5771 women with IBD and 1.3% of 793 110 women without IBD had an infectious complication, and the aOR of infections of the gastrointestinal tract was 3.17 (95% CI, 1.47-6.85). There were too few outcomes to calculate the risk of infections after assisted vaginal delivery.

CONCLUSIONS: The risk of a 30-day postpartum infectious complication is increased in women with IBD. Physicians should carefully monitor their patients postpartum to prevent these adverse outcomes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInflammatory Bowel Diseases
ISSN1078-0998
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 26. apr. 2022

Bibliografisk note

© The Author(s) 2022. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

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