Identifying Technical Procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology That Should Be Integrated in a Simulation-Based Curriculum

A National General Needs Assessment in Denmark

Amandus Gustafsson, Bjarke Viberg, Charlotte Paltved, Henrik Palm, Lars Konge, Leizl Joy Nayahangan

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

BACKGROUND: Simulation-based training is emerging within the orthopaedic field to alleviate the challenges that trainees face such as work-hour restrictions, limited exposure to procedures, and increasing pressures to reduce risk to patients. This training modality has grown increasingly popular over the last 2 decades. However, integration into the curriculum often fails to follow a structured educational plan. The development of simulation-based curricula should follow a structured and stepwise approach that starts with a general needs assessment. This study aimed to identify and prioritize procedures within orthopaedic surgery to be included in a simulation-based curriculum on a national basis. METHODS: A national needs assessment was conducted using the Delphi method. Ninety-five experts who are involved in the training of orthopaedic surgeons from all orthopaedic departments in Denmark were selected to participate in the assessment. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase to identify technical procedures that are relevant for orthopaedic surgeons in training. Round 2 was performed on a departmental basis; it explored the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, the risk and/or discomfort to patients, and the feasibility for simulation-based training to prioritize and eliminate some of the procedures that were determined in round 1. During round 3, the experts eliminated and reprioritized procedures from round 2 to produce a final prioritized list. RESULTS: During the first round, 194 procedures were identified. These were reduced to 62 in round 2, and the final list after round 3 consisted of 33 prioritized procedures that are relevant for simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery. The response rates were 63 of 95 physicians for round 1, 26 of 26 departments for round 2, and 64 of 97 physicians for round 3. The highest prioritized procedures were basic surgical techniques and principles for osteosynthesis, osteosynthesis of proximal femoral fracture, and surgical exposure of the upper and lower extremities. CONCLUSIONS: The prioritized list of technical procedures in orthopaedic surgery that are suitable for simulation-based training can aid in the development of a simulation-based curriculum. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This article offers insights into needs assessment and curriculum development of simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummere108
TidsskriftThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
Vol/bind101
Udgave nummer20
ISSN0021-9355
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 16. okt. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Needs Assessment
Denmark
Curriculum
Orthopedics
Patient Simulation
Physicians
Femoral Fractures

Citer dette

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title = "Identifying Technical Procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology That Should Be Integrated in a Simulation-Based Curriculum: A National General Needs Assessment in Denmark",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Simulation-based training is emerging within the orthopaedic field to alleviate the challenges that trainees face such as work-hour restrictions, limited exposure to procedures, and increasing pressures to reduce risk to patients. This training modality has grown increasingly popular over the last 2 decades. However, integration into the curriculum often fails to follow a structured educational plan. The development of simulation-based curricula should follow a structured and stepwise approach that starts with a general needs assessment. This study aimed to identify and prioritize procedures within orthopaedic surgery to be included in a simulation-based curriculum on a national basis. METHODS: A national needs assessment was conducted using the Delphi method. Ninety-five experts who are involved in the training of orthopaedic surgeons from all orthopaedic departments in Denmark were selected to participate in the assessment. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase to identify technical procedures that are relevant for orthopaedic surgeons in training. Round 2 was performed on a departmental basis; it explored the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, the risk and/or discomfort to patients, and the feasibility for simulation-based training to prioritize and eliminate some of the procedures that were determined in round 1. During round 3, the experts eliminated and reprioritized procedures from round 2 to produce a final prioritized list. RESULTS: During the first round, 194 procedures were identified. These were reduced to 62 in round 2, and the final list after round 3 consisted of 33 prioritized procedures that are relevant for simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery. The response rates were 63 of 95 physicians for round 1, 26 of 26 departments for round 2, and 64 of 97 physicians for round 3. The highest prioritized procedures were basic surgical techniques and principles for osteosynthesis, osteosynthesis of proximal femoral fracture, and surgical exposure of the upper and lower extremities. CONCLUSIONS: The prioritized list of technical procedures in orthopaedic surgery that are suitable for simulation-based training can aid in the development of a simulation-based curriculum. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This article offers insights into needs assessment and curriculum development of simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology.",
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Identifying Technical Procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology That Should Be Integrated in a Simulation-Based Curriculum : A National General Needs Assessment in Denmark. / Gustafsson, Amandus; Viberg, Bjarke; Paltved, Charlotte; Palm, Henrik; Konge, Lars; Nayahangan, Leizl Joy.

I: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume, Bind 101, Nr. 20, e108, 16.10.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identifying Technical Procedures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology That Should Be Integrated in a Simulation-Based Curriculum

T2 - A National General Needs Assessment in Denmark

AU - Gustafsson, Amandus

AU - Viberg, Bjarke

AU - Paltved, Charlotte

AU - Palm, Henrik

AU - Konge, Lars

AU - Nayahangan, Leizl Joy

PY - 2019/10/16

Y1 - 2019/10/16

N2 - BACKGROUND: Simulation-based training is emerging within the orthopaedic field to alleviate the challenges that trainees face such as work-hour restrictions, limited exposure to procedures, and increasing pressures to reduce risk to patients. This training modality has grown increasingly popular over the last 2 decades. However, integration into the curriculum often fails to follow a structured educational plan. The development of simulation-based curricula should follow a structured and stepwise approach that starts with a general needs assessment. This study aimed to identify and prioritize procedures within orthopaedic surgery to be included in a simulation-based curriculum on a national basis. METHODS: A national needs assessment was conducted using the Delphi method. Ninety-five experts who are involved in the training of orthopaedic surgeons from all orthopaedic departments in Denmark were selected to participate in the assessment. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase to identify technical procedures that are relevant for orthopaedic surgeons in training. Round 2 was performed on a departmental basis; it explored the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, the risk and/or discomfort to patients, and the feasibility for simulation-based training to prioritize and eliminate some of the procedures that were determined in round 1. During round 3, the experts eliminated and reprioritized procedures from round 2 to produce a final prioritized list. RESULTS: During the first round, 194 procedures were identified. These were reduced to 62 in round 2, and the final list after round 3 consisted of 33 prioritized procedures that are relevant for simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery. The response rates were 63 of 95 physicians for round 1, 26 of 26 departments for round 2, and 64 of 97 physicians for round 3. The highest prioritized procedures were basic surgical techniques and principles for osteosynthesis, osteosynthesis of proximal femoral fracture, and surgical exposure of the upper and lower extremities. CONCLUSIONS: The prioritized list of technical procedures in orthopaedic surgery that are suitable for simulation-based training can aid in the development of a simulation-based curriculum. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This article offers insights into needs assessment and curriculum development of simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology.

AB - BACKGROUND: Simulation-based training is emerging within the orthopaedic field to alleviate the challenges that trainees face such as work-hour restrictions, limited exposure to procedures, and increasing pressures to reduce risk to patients. This training modality has grown increasingly popular over the last 2 decades. However, integration into the curriculum often fails to follow a structured educational plan. The development of simulation-based curricula should follow a structured and stepwise approach that starts with a general needs assessment. This study aimed to identify and prioritize procedures within orthopaedic surgery to be included in a simulation-based curriculum on a national basis. METHODS: A national needs assessment was conducted using the Delphi method. Ninety-five experts who are involved in the training of orthopaedic surgeons from all orthopaedic departments in Denmark were selected to participate in the assessment. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase to identify technical procedures that are relevant for orthopaedic surgeons in training. Round 2 was performed on a departmental basis; it explored the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, the risk and/or discomfort to patients, and the feasibility for simulation-based training to prioritize and eliminate some of the procedures that were determined in round 1. During round 3, the experts eliminated and reprioritized procedures from round 2 to produce a final prioritized list. RESULTS: During the first round, 194 procedures were identified. These were reduced to 62 in round 2, and the final list after round 3 consisted of 33 prioritized procedures that are relevant for simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery. The response rates were 63 of 95 physicians for round 1, 26 of 26 departments for round 2, and 64 of 97 physicians for round 3. The highest prioritized procedures were basic surgical techniques and principles for osteosynthesis, osteosynthesis of proximal femoral fracture, and surgical exposure of the upper and lower extremities. CONCLUSIONS: The prioritized list of technical procedures in orthopaedic surgery that are suitable for simulation-based training can aid in the development of a simulation-based curriculum. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This article offers insights into needs assessment and curriculum development of simulation-based training in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology.

U2 - 10.2106/JBJS.18.01122

DO - 10.2106/JBJS.18.01122

M3 - Journal article

VL - 101

JO - Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery: American Volume

JF - Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery: American Volume

SN - 0021-9355

IS - 20

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