Hypothyroidism and urinary incontinence: Prevalence and association in a Danish, female sample from the Lolland-Falster Health study

Ea Løwenstein*, Randi Jepsen, Lea Laird Andersen, Jennie Laigaard, Lars Alling Møller, Peter Gæde, Lisbeth Bonde, Helga Gimbel

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

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Abstrakt

Introduction: We aimed to estimate the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) in women with hypothyroidism and subclinical hypothyroidism and to examine the association of hypothyroidism and UI. Methods: This cross-sectional study was based on the population-based Lolland-Falster Health Study (LOFUS), Denmark. Data comprising a questionnaire, physical examination, and blood samples were collected between 2016 and 2020. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and control for possible confounders: age, body mass index, diabetes, smoking, and education. Results: Of 7,699 women included in the study, 7.9% had hypothyroidism, and 2.4% had subclinical hypothyroidism. The prevalence of any UI in women with hypothyroidism, subclinical hypothyroidism, and a control group (normal level of thyroid hormones) was 43.6%, 38.1%, and 39.3%, respectively. After controlling for confounders, no association between hypothyroidism and any UI (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.85-1.20) or frequent UI (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.84-1.32) were demonstrated. Additional, no association between subclinical hypothyroidism and any UI (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.64-1.18) or frequent UI (OR 1.15, 95 CI 0.79-1.69) were demonstrated. Conclusions: In our female sample, the prevalence of UI was high regardless of the thyroid status. No association between hypothyroidism and any or frequent UI was demonstrated. The prevalence of hypothyroidism was 7.9%.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology
Vol/bind264
Sider (fra-til)232-240
ISSN0301-2115
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
This study was funded by Nykøbing Falster Hospital; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Nykøbing Falster Hospital; Region Zealand Health Research Fund; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde; Data and Development Support, Region Zealand; ”Cutting the Edge” prize from Astellas by co-supervisor Lea Laird Andersen (ID:001A0001J33QYIAZ); Edith and Henrik Henriksens memorial Fund; King Christian Xs memorial Fund; Grosserer L.F. Foghts Fund; Aase and Ejnar Danielsen Fund; AP Møller Fund. The funding sources did not have any role in conducting the study and did not participate in the manuscript's writing.

Funding Information:
The Lolland-Falster Health Study (LOFUS), Nyk?bing Falster Hospital, Denmark, is a collaboration between Lolland and Guldborgsund Municipalities, Region Zealand and Nyk?bing Falster Hospital. The authors are grateful to LOFUS for making the LOFUS research data available. However, LOFUS bears no responsibility for analyses or interpretations conducted within this study. This study was funded by Nyk?bing Falster Hospital; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Nyk?bing Falster Hospital; Region Zealand Health Research Fund; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde; Data and Development Support, Region Zealand; ?Cutting the Edge? prize from Astellas by co-supervisor Lea Laird Andersen (ID:001A0001J33QYIAZ); Edith and Henrik Henriksens memorial Fund; King Christian Xs memorial Fund; Grosserer L.F. Foghts Fund; Aase and Ejnar Danielsen Fund; AP M?ller Fund. The funding sources did not have any role in conducting the study and did not participate in the manuscript's writing.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

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