How does information on the harms and benefits of cervical cancer screening alter the intention to be screened? a randomized survey of Norwegian women

Anita L. Iyer*, M. Kate Bundorf, Dorte Gyrd-Hansen, Jeremy D. Goldhaber-Fiebert, Pascale Renée Cyr, Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen

*Kontaktforfatter for dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Cervical cancer (CC) is the 13th most frequent cancer among women in Norway, but the third most common among women aged 25-49 years. The national screening program sends information letters to promote screening participation. We aimed to evaluate how women's stated intention to participate in screening and pursue treatment changed with the provision of additional information on harms associated with screening, and to assess women's preferences on the timing and source of such information. We administered a web-based questionnaire to a panel of Norwegian women aged 25-69 years and randomized into three groups on the basis of when in the screening process additional information was introduced: (i) invited for routine screening, (ii) recommended an additional test following detection of cellular abnormalities, and (iii) recommended precancer treatment. A fourth (control) group did not receive any additional information. Results show that among 1060 respondents, additional information did not significantly alter women's stated intentions to screen. However, it created decision uncertainty on when treatment was recommended (8.76-9.09 vs. 9.40; 10-point Likert scale; P=0.004). Over 80% of women favored receiving information on harms and 59% preferred that information come from a qualified public health authority. Nearly 90% of women in all groups overestimated women's lifetime risk of CC. In conclusion, additional information on harms did not alter Norwegian women's stated intention to screen for CC; yet, it resulted in greater decision uncertainty to undergo precancer treatment. Incorporating information on harms into invitation letters is warranted as it would increase women's ability to make informed choices.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP)
Vol/bind28
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)87-95
ISSN0959-8278
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. mar. 2019

Fingeraftryk

Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Uncertainty
Surveys and Questionnaires
Norway
Public Health
Control Groups

Citer dette

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title = "How does information on the harms and benefits of cervical cancer screening alter the intention to be screened?: a randomized survey of Norwegian women",
abstract = "Cervical cancer (CC) is the 13th most frequent cancer among women in Norway, but the third most common among women aged 25-49 years. The national screening program sends information letters to promote screening participation. We aimed to evaluate how women's stated intention to participate in screening and pursue treatment changed with the provision of additional information on harms associated with screening, and to assess women's preferences on the timing and source of such information. We administered a web-based questionnaire to a panel of Norwegian women aged 25-69 years and randomized into three groups on the basis of when in the screening process additional information was introduced: (i) invited for routine screening, (ii) recommended an additional test following detection of cellular abnormalities, and (iii) recommended precancer treatment. A fourth (control) group did not receive any additional information. Results show that among 1060 respondents, additional information did not significantly alter women's stated intentions to screen. However, it created decision uncertainty on when treatment was recommended (8.76-9.09 vs. 9.40; 10-point Likert scale; P=0.004). Over 80{\%} of women favored receiving information on harms and 59{\%} preferred that information come from a qualified public health authority. Nearly 90{\%} of women in all groups overestimated women's lifetime risk of CC. In conclusion, additional information on harms did not alter Norwegian women's stated intention to screen for CC; yet, it resulted in greater decision uncertainty to undergo precancer treatment. Incorporating information on harms into invitation letters is warranted as it would increase women's ability to make informed choices.",
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How does information on the harms and benefits of cervical cancer screening alter the intention to be screened? a randomized survey of Norwegian women. / Iyer, Anita L.; Bundorf, M. Kate; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.; Cyr, Pascale Renée; Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar.

I: European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), Bind 28, Nr. 2, 01.03.2019, s. 87-95.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - How does information on the harms and benefits of cervical cancer screening alter the intention to be screened?

T2 - a randomized survey of Norwegian women

AU - Iyer, Anita L.

AU - Bundorf, M. Kate

AU - Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte

AU - Goldhaber-Fiebert, Jeremy D.

AU - Cyr, Pascale Renée

AU - Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Cervical cancer (CC) is the 13th most frequent cancer among women in Norway, but the third most common among women aged 25-49 years. The national screening program sends information letters to promote screening participation. We aimed to evaluate how women's stated intention to participate in screening and pursue treatment changed with the provision of additional information on harms associated with screening, and to assess women's preferences on the timing and source of such information. We administered a web-based questionnaire to a panel of Norwegian women aged 25-69 years and randomized into three groups on the basis of when in the screening process additional information was introduced: (i) invited for routine screening, (ii) recommended an additional test following detection of cellular abnormalities, and (iii) recommended precancer treatment. A fourth (control) group did not receive any additional information. Results show that among 1060 respondents, additional information did not significantly alter women's stated intentions to screen. However, it created decision uncertainty on when treatment was recommended (8.76-9.09 vs. 9.40; 10-point Likert scale; P=0.004). Over 80% of women favored receiving information on harms and 59% preferred that information come from a qualified public health authority. Nearly 90% of women in all groups overestimated women's lifetime risk of CC. In conclusion, additional information on harms did not alter Norwegian women's stated intention to screen for CC; yet, it resulted in greater decision uncertainty to undergo precancer treatment. Incorporating information on harms into invitation letters is warranted as it would increase women's ability to make informed choices.

AB - Cervical cancer (CC) is the 13th most frequent cancer among women in Norway, but the third most common among women aged 25-49 years. The national screening program sends information letters to promote screening participation. We aimed to evaluate how women's stated intention to participate in screening and pursue treatment changed with the provision of additional information on harms associated with screening, and to assess women's preferences on the timing and source of such information. We administered a web-based questionnaire to a panel of Norwegian women aged 25-69 years and randomized into three groups on the basis of when in the screening process additional information was introduced: (i) invited for routine screening, (ii) recommended an additional test following detection of cellular abnormalities, and (iii) recommended precancer treatment. A fourth (control) group did not receive any additional information. Results show that among 1060 respondents, additional information did not significantly alter women's stated intentions to screen. However, it created decision uncertainty on when treatment was recommended (8.76-9.09 vs. 9.40; 10-point Likert scale; P=0.004). Over 80% of women favored receiving information on harms and 59% preferred that information come from a qualified public health authority. Nearly 90% of women in all groups overestimated women's lifetime risk of CC. In conclusion, additional information on harms did not alter Norwegian women's stated intention to screen for CC; yet, it resulted in greater decision uncertainty to undergo precancer treatment. Incorporating information on harms into invitation letters is warranted as it would increase women's ability to make informed choices.

U2 - 10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000436

DO - 10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000436

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29595751

AN - SCOPUS:85060940172

VL - 28

SP - 87

EP - 95

JO - European Journal of Cancer Prevention

JF - European Journal of Cancer Prevention

SN - 0959-8278

IS - 2

ER -