Hiring, Developing, and Organizing Individual Employees for New Product Development versus Product-related Service Innovation

Mette Præst Knudsen, Stephanie Schleimer

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

Resumé

This study examines how manufacturing firms should organize their human resources by maximizing the value of individual employees for different forms of innovations. In particular, it examines the hiring, developing, and structural organization of human resources for optimizing different innovation outcomes. An analysis of 335 survey responses of the multi-topic and multi-country European Manufacturing Survey (EMS) results in a number of interesting findings. First and foremost, although there are commonalities in organizing employees in flexible team arrangements for new product development versus product-related service innovations, there are also important differences between these. In particular, whilst the educational level of employees has a significant and positive effect on new product development success, hiring highly educated individuals has a significant and negative effect on new product-related service development success. At the same time, while investing in individual training programmes is beneficial for new-product related services, such programmes have no impact on new product development. Combining our findings on these differences, it seems that in order to maximize the value of human resource hiring and developing practices for new product development success; organizations will find it more beneficial to invest predominantly in employees with the highest possible educational level, whilst for product-related service innovations; employees with more general skills should be hired. For the latter case, these employees’ individual careers must be developed internally once hired. The paper therefore carries important implication for the innovation management literature and related human resource practices at different organizational levels.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdatojun. 2015
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2015
BegivenhedDRUID 2015: The Relevance of Innovation - LUISS Business School, Rom, Italien
Varighed: 15. jun. 201517. jun. 2015

Konference

KonferenceDRUID 2015
LokationLUISS Business School
LandItalien
ByRom
Periode15/06/201517/06/2015

Citer dette

@conference{292da37b12334fe88515bc9bd194e8d7,
title = "Hiring, Developing, and Organizing Individual Employees for New Product Development versus Product-related Service Innovation",
abstract = "This study examines how manufacturing firms should organize their human resources by maximizing the value of individual employees for different forms of innovations. In particular, it examines the hiring, developing, and structural organization of human resources for optimizing different innovation outcomes. An analysis of 335 survey responses of the multi-topic and multi-country European Manufacturing Survey (EMS) results in a number of interesting findings. First and foremost, although there are commonalities in organizing employees in flexible team arrangements for new product development versus product-related service innovations, there are also important differences between these. In particular, whilst the educational level of employees has a significant and positive effect on new product development success, hiring highly educated individuals has a significant and negative effect on new product-related service development success. At the same time, while investing in individual training programmes is beneficial for new-product related services, such programmes have no impact on new product development. Combining our findings on these differences, it seems that in order to maximize the value of human resource hiring and developing practices for new product development success; organizations will find it more beneficial to invest predominantly in employees with the highest possible educational level, whilst for product-related service innovations; employees with more general skills should be hired. For the latter case, these employees’ individual careers must be developed internally once hired. The paper therefore carries important implication for the innovation management literature and related human resource practices at different organizational levels.",
author = "Knudsen, {Mette Pr{\ae}st} and Stephanie Schleimer",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
language = "English",
note = "null ; Conference date: 15-06-2015 Through 17-06-2015",

}

Knudsen, MP & Schleimer, S 2015, 'Hiring, Developing, and Organizing Individual Employees for New Product Development versus Product-related Service Innovation' Paper fremlagt ved DRUID 2015, Rom, Italien, 15/06/2015 - 17/06/2015, .

Hiring, Developing, and Organizing Individual Employees for New Product Development versus Product-related Service Innovation. / Knudsen, Mette Præst; Schleimer, Stephanie.

2015. Afhandling præsenteret på DRUID 2015, Rom, Italien.

Publikation: Konferencebidrag uden forlag/tidsskriftPaperForskningpeer review

TY - CONF

T1 - Hiring, Developing, and Organizing Individual Employees for New Product Development versus Product-related Service Innovation

AU - Knudsen, Mette Præst

AU - Schleimer, Stephanie

PY - 2015/6

Y1 - 2015/6

N2 - This study examines how manufacturing firms should organize their human resources by maximizing the value of individual employees for different forms of innovations. In particular, it examines the hiring, developing, and structural organization of human resources for optimizing different innovation outcomes. An analysis of 335 survey responses of the multi-topic and multi-country European Manufacturing Survey (EMS) results in a number of interesting findings. First and foremost, although there are commonalities in organizing employees in flexible team arrangements for new product development versus product-related service innovations, there are also important differences between these. In particular, whilst the educational level of employees has a significant and positive effect on new product development success, hiring highly educated individuals has a significant and negative effect on new product-related service development success. At the same time, while investing in individual training programmes is beneficial for new-product related services, such programmes have no impact on new product development. Combining our findings on these differences, it seems that in order to maximize the value of human resource hiring and developing practices for new product development success; organizations will find it more beneficial to invest predominantly in employees with the highest possible educational level, whilst for product-related service innovations; employees with more general skills should be hired. For the latter case, these employees’ individual careers must be developed internally once hired. The paper therefore carries important implication for the innovation management literature and related human resource practices at different organizational levels.

AB - This study examines how manufacturing firms should organize their human resources by maximizing the value of individual employees for different forms of innovations. In particular, it examines the hiring, developing, and structural organization of human resources for optimizing different innovation outcomes. An analysis of 335 survey responses of the multi-topic and multi-country European Manufacturing Survey (EMS) results in a number of interesting findings. First and foremost, although there are commonalities in organizing employees in flexible team arrangements for new product development versus product-related service innovations, there are also important differences between these. In particular, whilst the educational level of employees has a significant and positive effect on new product development success, hiring highly educated individuals has a significant and negative effect on new product-related service development success. At the same time, while investing in individual training programmes is beneficial for new-product related services, such programmes have no impact on new product development. Combining our findings on these differences, it seems that in order to maximize the value of human resource hiring and developing practices for new product development success; organizations will find it more beneficial to invest predominantly in employees with the highest possible educational level, whilst for product-related service innovations; employees with more general skills should be hired. For the latter case, these employees’ individual careers must be developed internally once hired. The paper therefore carries important implication for the innovation management literature and related human resource practices at different organizational levels.

M3 - Paper

ER -