High-fidelity fluid-structure interaction modeling of bird vocalization in syrinx

Weili Jiang, Qian Xue, Xudong Zheng, Jeppe Have Rasmussen, Coen P.H. Elemans

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Resumé

Birds are useful models for studying human phonation since both of them learn vocal communication by mimicking. Traditional computational models help understand the basic mechanism in sound production and are very useful in parametric studies but limited by the largely simplified morphology and the lack of direct relationship between model input and tissue parameter. Thus the objectives of the current study are to: (a) develop a first-principle based, fluid-structure interaction computational model which can accurately reproduce the vibration of lateral vibration mass (LVM) and sound signal and (b) validate the model against experimental measurements on a rock pigeon syringeal model. In the current approach, a sharp-interface immersed-boundary-method based incompressible flow solver was utilized to model the air flow, and a finite element method based solid mechanics solver was utilized to model the vibration of LVM. Geometry of the syrinx was based on CT scans of the rock pigeon’s syrinx. The simulation results of the fundamental frequency, LVMs opening size, sound pressure level, laryngeal flow field were analyzed and compared to the experimental data.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Titel2018 AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting
ForlagAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. (AIAA)
Publikationsdato2018
Artikelnummer2018-0578
ISBN (Trykt)9781624105241
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018
BegivenhedAIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, 2018 - Kissimmee, USA
Varighed: 8. jan. 201812. jan. 2018

Konference

KonferenceAIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, 2018
LandUSA
ByKissimmee
Periode08/01/201812/01/2018

Fingeraftryk

Syringes
Fluid structure interaction
Birds
Acoustic waves
Vibrations (mechanical)
Rocks
Computerized tomography
Incompressible flow
Flow fields
Mechanics
Tissue
Finite element method
Geometry
Communication

Citer dette

Jiang, W., Xue, Q., Zheng, X., Rasmussen, J. H., & Elemans, C. P. H. (2018). High-fidelity fluid-structure interaction modeling of bird vocalization in syrinx. I 2018 AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting [2018-0578] American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. (AIAA). https://doi.org/10.2514/6.2018-0578
Jiang, Weili ; Xue, Qian ; Zheng, Xudong ; Rasmussen, Jeppe Have ; Elemans, Coen P.H. / High-fidelity fluid-structure interaction modeling of bird vocalization in syrinx. 2018 AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. (AIAA), 2018.
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title = "High-fidelity fluid-structure interaction modeling of bird vocalization in syrinx",
abstract = "Birds are useful models for studying human phonation since both of them learn vocal communication by mimicking. Traditional computational models help understand the basic mechanism in sound production and are very useful in parametric studies but limited by the largely simplified morphology and the lack of direct relationship between model input and tissue parameter. Thus the objectives of the current study are to: (a) develop a first-principle based, fluid-structure interaction computational model which can accurately reproduce the vibration of lateral vibration mass (LVM) and sound signal and (b) validate the model against experimental measurements on a rock pigeon syringeal model. In the current approach, a sharp-interface immersed-boundary-method based incompressible flow solver was utilized to model the air flow, and a finite element method based solid mechanics solver was utilized to model the vibration of LVM. Geometry of the syrinx was based on CT scans of the rock pigeon’s syrinx. The simulation results of the fundamental frequency, LVMs opening size, sound pressure level, laryngeal flow field were analyzed and compared to the experimental data.",
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Jiang, W, Xue, Q, Zheng, X, Rasmussen, JH & Elemans, CPH 2018, High-fidelity fluid-structure interaction modeling of bird vocalization in syrinx. i 2018 AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting., 2018-0578, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. (AIAA), AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, 2018, Kissimmee, USA, 08/01/2018. https://doi.org/10.2514/6.2018-0578

High-fidelity fluid-structure interaction modeling of bird vocalization in syrinx. / Jiang, Weili; Xue, Qian; Zheng, Xudong; Rasmussen, Jeppe Have; Elemans, Coen P.H.

2018 AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. (AIAA), 2018. 2018-0578.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/konference-proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

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AU - Jiang, Weili

AU - Xue, Qian

AU - Zheng, Xudong

AU - Rasmussen, Jeppe Have

AU - Elemans, Coen P.H.

PY - 2018

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AB - Birds are useful models for studying human phonation since both of them learn vocal communication by mimicking. Traditional computational models help understand the basic mechanism in sound production and are very useful in parametric studies but limited by the largely simplified morphology and the lack of direct relationship between model input and tissue parameter. Thus the objectives of the current study are to: (a) develop a first-principle based, fluid-structure interaction computational model which can accurately reproduce the vibration of lateral vibration mass (LVM) and sound signal and (b) validate the model against experimental measurements on a rock pigeon syringeal model. In the current approach, a sharp-interface immersed-boundary-method based incompressible flow solver was utilized to model the air flow, and a finite element method based solid mechanics solver was utilized to model the vibration of LVM. Geometry of the syrinx was based on CT scans of the rock pigeon’s syrinx. The simulation results of the fundamental frequency, LVMs opening size, sound pressure level, laryngeal flow field were analyzed and compared to the experimental data.

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Jiang W, Xue Q, Zheng X, Rasmussen JH, Elemans CPH. High-fidelity fluid-structure interaction modeling of bird vocalization in syrinx. I 2018 AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. (AIAA). 2018. 2018-0578 https://doi.org/10.2514/6.2018-0578