Heritability of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain: a comprehensive genetic epidemiologic analysis using a population-based sample of 15,328 twins ages 20-71 years

Jan Hartvigsen, Jan Nielsen, Kirsten Ohm Kyvik, Rene Fejer, Werner Vach, Ivan Iachine, Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Oct-15
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftArthritis & Rheumatism
Vol/bind61
Udgave nummer10
Sider (fra-til)1343-51
Antal sider8
ISSN0004-3591
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 15. okt. 2009

Fingeraftryk

Population
Neck Pain
Dizygotic Twins
Pensions
Sick Leave
Registries
Exercise

Citer dette

@article{c4a844a0073411dfaefb000ea68e967b,
title = "Heritability of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain: a comprehensive genetic epidemiologic analysis using a population-based sample of 15,328 twins ages 20-71 years",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To assess the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to different definitions of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain. METHODS: The Danish Twin Registry contains detailed survey information on spinal pain and its consequences in twins ages 20-71 years. A classic genetic epidemiologic analysis was performed in order to establish heritability for a number of phenotypes, including location of pain, radiation of pain in the extremities or chest, pain duration, and combinations of pain in >1 spinal area. Consequences included reduced physical activity, sick leave, care seeking, change of work, and disability pension. The analysis included a biometric analysis based on the effect of shared genetic and common environmental factors. Furthermore, a bivariate twin model was fitted to identify genetic and environmental correlations. RESULTS: Altogether, data on 15,328 twin individuals (44{\%} monozygotic and 56{\%} dizygotic) from complete twin pairs were included. Genetic susceptibility explained approximately 38{\%} of lumbar pain, 32{\%} of thoracic pain, and 39{\%} of neck pain. For patterns of pain, estimates were 7{\%} for lumbar/thoracic, 24{\%} for lumbar/cervical, 0{\%} for thoracic/cervical, and 35{\%} for pain in all 3 areas. Moderate to high genetic correlations indicated a common genetic basis for many spinal pain syndromes. In general, heritability was higher for women, and only a minor age effect was seen. CONCLUSION: Heritability estimates for pain in different spinal regions are quite similar and there is a moderate to high genetic correlation between the phenotypes. This may indicate a common genetic basis for a high proportion of spinal pain.",
keywords = "Activities of Daily Living, Adult, Aged, Back Pain, Denmark, Diseases in Twins, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Health Status, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neck Pain, Odds Ratio, Questionnaires, Twins, Twins, Dizygotic, Twins, Monozygotic, Young Adult",
author = "Jan Hartvigsen and Jan Nielsen and Kyvik, {Kirsten Ohm} and Rene Fejer and Werner Vach and Ivan Iachine and Charlotte Leboeuf-Yde",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1002/art.24607",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "1343--51",
journal = "Arthritis & Rheumatology",
issn = "2326-5191",
publisher = "Heinemann",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heritability of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain: a comprehensive genetic epidemiologic analysis using a population-based sample of 15,328 twins ages 20-71 years

AU - Hartvigsen, Jan

AU - Nielsen, Jan

AU - Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

AU - Fejer, Rene

AU - Vach, Werner

AU - Iachine, Ivan

AU - Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

PY - 2009/10/15

Y1 - 2009/10/15

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to different definitions of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain. METHODS: The Danish Twin Registry contains detailed survey information on spinal pain and its consequences in twins ages 20-71 years. A classic genetic epidemiologic analysis was performed in order to establish heritability for a number of phenotypes, including location of pain, radiation of pain in the extremities or chest, pain duration, and combinations of pain in >1 spinal area. Consequences included reduced physical activity, sick leave, care seeking, change of work, and disability pension. The analysis included a biometric analysis based on the effect of shared genetic and common environmental factors. Furthermore, a bivariate twin model was fitted to identify genetic and environmental correlations. RESULTS: Altogether, data on 15,328 twin individuals (44% monozygotic and 56% dizygotic) from complete twin pairs were included. Genetic susceptibility explained approximately 38% of lumbar pain, 32% of thoracic pain, and 39% of neck pain. For patterns of pain, estimates were 7% for lumbar/thoracic, 24% for lumbar/cervical, 0% for thoracic/cervical, and 35% for pain in all 3 areas. Moderate to high genetic correlations indicated a common genetic basis for many spinal pain syndromes. In general, heritability was higher for women, and only a minor age effect was seen. CONCLUSION: Heritability estimates for pain in different spinal regions are quite similar and there is a moderate to high genetic correlation between the phenotypes. This may indicate a common genetic basis for a high proportion of spinal pain.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To assess the relative contribution of genetic and environmental factors to different definitions of spinal pain and consequences of spinal pain. METHODS: The Danish Twin Registry contains detailed survey information on spinal pain and its consequences in twins ages 20-71 years. A classic genetic epidemiologic analysis was performed in order to establish heritability for a number of phenotypes, including location of pain, radiation of pain in the extremities or chest, pain duration, and combinations of pain in >1 spinal area. Consequences included reduced physical activity, sick leave, care seeking, change of work, and disability pension. The analysis included a biometric analysis based on the effect of shared genetic and common environmental factors. Furthermore, a bivariate twin model was fitted to identify genetic and environmental correlations. RESULTS: Altogether, data on 15,328 twin individuals (44% monozygotic and 56% dizygotic) from complete twin pairs were included. Genetic susceptibility explained approximately 38% of lumbar pain, 32% of thoracic pain, and 39% of neck pain. For patterns of pain, estimates were 7% for lumbar/thoracic, 24% for lumbar/cervical, 0% for thoracic/cervical, and 35% for pain in all 3 areas. Moderate to high genetic correlations indicated a common genetic basis for many spinal pain syndromes. In general, heritability was higher for women, and only a minor age effect was seen. CONCLUSION: Heritability estimates for pain in different spinal regions are quite similar and there is a moderate to high genetic correlation between the phenotypes. This may indicate a common genetic basis for a high proportion of spinal pain.

KW - Activities of Daily Living

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Back Pain

KW - Denmark

KW - Diseases in Twins

KW - Female

KW - Genetic Predisposition to Disease

KW - Health Status

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Neck Pain

KW - Odds Ratio

KW - Questionnaires

KW - Twins

KW - Twins, Dizygotic

KW - Twins, Monozygotic

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1002/art.24607

DO - 10.1002/art.24607

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19790135

VL - 61

SP - 1343

EP - 1351

JO - Arthritis & Rheumatology

JF - Arthritis & Rheumatology

SN - 2326-5191

IS - 10

ER -