Heritability of adult body height: A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries

Karri Silventoinen, Sampo Sammalisto, Markus Perola, Dorret I Boomsma, Belinda K Cornes, Chayna Davis, Leo Dunkel, Marlies De Lange, Jennifer R Harris, Jacob V B Hjelmborg, Michelle Luciano, Nicholas G Martin, Jakob Mortensen, Lorenza Nisticò, Nancy L Pedersen, Axel Skytthe, Tim D Spector, Maria Antonietta Stazi, Gonneke Willemsen, Jaakko Kaprio

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Oct
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftTwin research
Vol/bind6
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)399-408
Antal sider9
ISSN1369-0523
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1. okt. 2003

Fingeraftryk

Twin Studies
Cohort Studies
Population
Genetic Models
Sex Characteristics
Netherlands
Italy

Citer dette

Silventoinen, K., Sammalisto, S., Perola, M., Boomsma, D. I., Cornes, B. K., Davis, C., ... Kaprio, J. (2003). Heritability of adult body height: A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries. Twin research, 6(5), 399-408. https://doi.org/10.1375/136905203770326402
Silventoinen, Karri ; Sammalisto, Sampo ; Perola, Markus ; Boomsma, Dorret I ; Cornes, Belinda K ; Davis, Chayna ; Dunkel, Leo ; De Lange, Marlies ; Harris, Jennifer R ; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B ; Luciano, Michelle ; Martin, Nicholas G ; Mortensen, Jakob ; Nisticò, Lorenza ; Pedersen, Nancy L ; Skytthe, Axel ; Spector, Tim D ; Stazi, Maria Antonietta ; Willemsen, Gonneke ; Kaprio, Jaakko. / Heritability of adult body height : A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries. I: Twin research. 2003 ; Bind 6, Nr. 5. s. 399-408.
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title = "Heritability of adult body height: A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries",
abstract = "A major component of variation in body height is due to genetic differences, but environmental factors have a substantial contributory effect. In this study we aimed to analyse whether the genetic architecture of body height varies between affluent western societies. We analysed twin data from eight countries comprising 30,111 complete twin pairs by using the univariate genetic model of the Mx statistical package. Body height and zygosity were self-reported in seven populations and measured directly in one population. We found that there was substantial variation in mean body height between countries; body height was least in Italy (177 cm in men and 163 cm in women) and greatest in the Netherlands (184 cm and 171 cm, respectively). In men there was no corresponding variation in heritability of body height, heritability estimates ranging from 0.87 to 0.93 in populations under an additive genes/unique environment (AE) model. Among women the heritability estimates were generally lower than among men with greater variation between countries, ranging from 0.68 to 0.84 when an additive genes/shared environment/unique environment (ACE) model was used. In four populations where an AE model fit equally well or better, heritability ranged from 0.89 to 0.93. This difference between the sexes was mainly due to the effect of the shared environmental component of variance, which appears to be more important among women than among men in our study populations. Our results indicate that, in general, there are only minor differences in the genetic architecture of height between affluent Caucasian populations, especially among men.",
keywords = "Adult, Australia, Body Height, Denmark, Female, Finland, Great Britain, Humans, Italy, Male, Models, Genetic, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden",
author = "Karri Silventoinen and Sampo Sammalisto and Markus Perola and Boomsma, {Dorret I} and Cornes, {Belinda K} and Chayna Davis and Leo Dunkel and {De Lange}, Marlies and Harris, {Jennifer R} and Hjelmborg, {Jacob V B} and Michelle Luciano and Martin, {Nicholas G} and Jakob Mortensen and Lorenza Nistic{\`o} and Pedersen, {Nancy L} and Axel Skytthe and Spector, {Tim D} and Stazi, {Maria Antonietta} and Gonneke Willemsen and Jaakko Kaprio",
year = "2003",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1375/136905203770326402",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "399--408",
journal = "Twin Research and Human Genetics",
issn = "1832-4274",
publisher = "Heinemann",
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Silventoinen, K, Sammalisto, S, Perola, M, Boomsma, DI, Cornes, BK, Davis, C, Dunkel, L, De Lange, M, Harris, JR, Hjelmborg, JVB, Luciano, M, Martin, NG, Mortensen, J, Nisticò, L, Pedersen, NL, Skytthe, A, Spector, TD, Stazi, MA, Willemsen, G & Kaprio, J 2003, 'Heritability of adult body height: A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries', Twin research, bind 6, nr. 5, s. 399-408. https://doi.org/10.1375/136905203770326402

Heritability of adult body height : A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries. / Silventoinen, Karri; Sammalisto, Sampo; Perola, Markus; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cornes, Belinda K; Davis, Chayna; Dunkel, Leo; De Lange, Marlies; Harris, Jennifer R; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Luciano, Michelle; Martin, Nicholas G; Mortensen, Jakob; Nisticò, Lorenza; Pedersen, Nancy L; Skytthe, Axel; Spector, Tim D; Stazi, Maria Antonietta; Willemsen, Gonneke; Kaprio, Jaakko.

I: Twin research, Bind 6, Nr. 5, 01.10.2003, s. 399-408.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heritability of adult body height

T2 - A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries

AU - Silventoinen, Karri

AU - Sammalisto, Sampo

AU - Perola, Markus

AU - Boomsma, Dorret I

AU - Cornes, Belinda K

AU - Davis, Chayna

AU - Dunkel, Leo

AU - De Lange, Marlies

AU - Harris, Jennifer R

AU - Hjelmborg, Jacob V B

AU - Luciano, Michelle

AU - Martin, Nicholas G

AU - Mortensen, Jakob

AU - Nisticò, Lorenza

AU - Pedersen, Nancy L

AU - Skytthe, Axel

AU - Spector, Tim D

AU - Stazi, Maria Antonietta

AU - Willemsen, Gonneke

AU - Kaprio, Jaakko

PY - 2003/10/1

Y1 - 2003/10/1

N2 - A major component of variation in body height is due to genetic differences, but environmental factors have a substantial contributory effect. In this study we aimed to analyse whether the genetic architecture of body height varies between affluent western societies. We analysed twin data from eight countries comprising 30,111 complete twin pairs by using the univariate genetic model of the Mx statistical package. Body height and zygosity were self-reported in seven populations and measured directly in one population. We found that there was substantial variation in mean body height between countries; body height was least in Italy (177 cm in men and 163 cm in women) and greatest in the Netherlands (184 cm and 171 cm, respectively). In men there was no corresponding variation in heritability of body height, heritability estimates ranging from 0.87 to 0.93 in populations under an additive genes/unique environment (AE) model. Among women the heritability estimates were generally lower than among men with greater variation between countries, ranging from 0.68 to 0.84 when an additive genes/shared environment/unique environment (ACE) model was used. In four populations where an AE model fit equally well or better, heritability ranged from 0.89 to 0.93. This difference between the sexes was mainly due to the effect of the shared environmental component of variance, which appears to be more important among women than among men in our study populations. Our results indicate that, in general, there are only minor differences in the genetic architecture of height between affluent Caucasian populations, especially among men.

AB - A major component of variation in body height is due to genetic differences, but environmental factors have a substantial contributory effect. In this study we aimed to analyse whether the genetic architecture of body height varies between affluent western societies. We analysed twin data from eight countries comprising 30,111 complete twin pairs by using the univariate genetic model of the Mx statistical package. Body height and zygosity were self-reported in seven populations and measured directly in one population. We found that there was substantial variation in mean body height between countries; body height was least in Italy (177 cm in men and 163 cm in women) and greatest in the Netherlands (184 cm and 171 cm, respectively). In men there was no corresponding variation in heritability of body height, heritability estimates ranging from 0.87 to 0.93 in populations under an additive genes/unique environment (AE) model. Among women the heritability estimates were generally lower than among men with greater variation between countries, ranging from 0.68 to 0.84 when an additive genes/shared environment/unique environment (ACE) model was used. In four populations where an AE model fit equally well or better, heritability ranged from 0.89 to 0.93. This difference between the sexes was mainly due to the effect of the shared environmental component of variance, which appears to be more important among women than among men in our study populations. Our results indicate that, in general, there are only minor differences in the genetic architecture of height between affluent Caucasian populations, especially among men.

KW - Adult

KW - Australia

KW - Body Height

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Finland

KW - Great Britain

KW - Humans

KW - Italy

KW - Male

KW - Models, Genetic

KW - Netherlands

KW - Norway

KW - Sweden

U2 - 10.1375/136905203770326402

DO - 10.1375/136905203770326402

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 14624724

VL - 6

SP - 399

EP - 408

JO - Twin Research and Human Genetics

JF - Twin Research and Human Genetics

SN - 1832-4274

IS - 5

ER -

Silventoinen K, Sammalisto S, Perola M, Boomsma DI, Cornes BK, Davis C et al. Heritability of adult body height: A comparative study of twin cohorts in eight countries. Twin research. 2003 okt 1;6(5):399-408. https://doi.org/10.1375/136905203770326402